Company Stories  G-H

Stories that earlier appeared in Nelson's News 
Note 1: Carl Nelson Consulting, Inc is not an investment adviser and may hold a financial interest or client relationship in companies discussed.
(Note 2: Carl Nelson Consulting does not endorse these companies or organizations or their activities.) 
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G1 Therapeutics ... G3 ..... Galderma ..... Galenea ... Galena Biopharma .... Galera Therapeutics ... Galil Medical .... Galleon Pharmaceuticals ... GAM Enterprises ..... GameSalad .... Gamma Medica Ideas ... Garland Technology .... Garwood Medical Devices ..... GATR Technologies ..... G-Con ....Gecko Biomedical ..... Gel Combs .... Gelesis ... GelTech ... Gema Diagnostics ... Gemin X Pharmaceuticals ... GEMFIRE ... Gemmus Pharma ... Gemphire Thera ..... Gemstone Biotherapeutics .... Gen9 ... Genaera ... Genalyte .... Genapsys .... GenAudio ..... Gene by Gene ... Genelabs Technologies ... Gene Logic ... General Compression ... Generex Biotechnology ... General Pneumatics ... GeneCentric Diagnostics ... Gene Security Network .... GeneSegues Therapeutics ..... Genesis Laboratories ... GeneSystems ... Genetesis ..... Genetic Networks ..... Genetix Pharmaceuticals ... Geneu .... Genex ... Genia Technologies ... GenMark Diagnostics ....Genoa Pharmaceuticals ..... Genocea Biosciences ... Genomatica ... Genome Profiling ..... GenomeQuest ..... Genomic Health ... Genomind ..... Genoptix Medical Laboratory ... Genor ... Genprex .... Gen-Probe ... GenSpera ... GenTel BioSciences ... Gentris ... GenturaDx ... GenWay Biotech ... Genzyme ... Geocent .... Geocove ..... Geomagic ... GeoMed Analytical ... Geospiza ... GeoVantage .... GeoVax Labs ... GenVec ... Geron ... Gevo .... GI Dynamics ... GigOptix ... Gilead Sciences .... Giner ... Ginkgo BioWorks ... Glauconix .... Glaukos ... GlideLine Systems ... Gliknik ...Global Blood Therapeutics ...Global Cancer Diagnostics ..... GlobalPositions ..  Globe Dynamics Engineering InternationalGlobeImmune ... Gloucester Pharmaceuticals ... Glowforge ..... GlucaGo ... GlycoFi ... GlycoMimetics .... GlyGenix ..... Glyscend ..... ... GlySens ... GMZ Energy .... GnuBio ... Goddard Labs ... Goldfinch Bio ..... Good Start Genetics ... Gore Photonics ... Gotham Biotech ..... GPC-Rx ... gRadiant Research ... Gradiant ... GraftWorx .... Grail ..... Graphene Energy ... Graphenix Development .... Graphic Surgery ... GraphLab ... Grassroots Biotechnology ... GrayBug .... Graybug Vision ..... Great Basin Scientific ..... GreatGrow Maryland ... GreatPoint Energy ... Green & Grow .... GreenFuel Technologies ... Greenlight Biosciences .... Green Mountain Radio Research ... GreenSight Agronomics ..... Green Sulfcrete .... GreenTech America ... Green Volts .... Greenwich Geriatrics ..... GridBridge ... Gritstone Oncology ..... GRO Biosciences .... Group14 Technologies ..... Grove Instruments ... Grow Home Organics ... GSI Technology ... GT Advanced Technologies .... GTC Biotherapeutics ... G-Tech Medical ... GT Equipment .... GTI Diagnostics ... GTx ..... Guardant Health .... Guided Surgery Solutions .... Guided Therapeutics ...Guided Therapy Systems ... Gynesonics .... G-Zero Therapeutics ... H2O Score ... H2Pump ... H2Sonics ... H3 Biomedicine ... HNC Software ... Halozyme ... Hana Biosciences ... Hansen Energy and Environmental .... Hansen Medical ... Haplogen Genomics ..... Harbor Technologies ... Hardcore Computer ... HarkerBio ..... Harmony Enterprises .... Harpoon Medical ... Harrisvaccines ..... Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology ... Harvard Bioscience ... Harvest Automation ... Harvest Power ... Harvest Technologies ..... Healionics ...Health Diagnostics Laboratories ..... HealthMyne ... HealthTell .... HealthTronics ... Hearforward ... Heartland Robotics ... HeartWare International ... Heat Biologics ... HeatGenie ... Helicos BioSciencesHeliovolt ... Helion Energy .... Helius Medical Technologies ..... Helix Therapeutics ... Helomics ..... Hemadvance ..... HemaQuest Pharmaceuticals ... Hemarrest ... Hemera Biosciences ... Hemispherx Biopharma ..... HemoGenyx .... HemoSonics .... Hemostasis .... Hennepin Life Sciences ..... Hepregen ... Heraeus Medical Components ... Herley Industries ... Hermes Biosciences ... HexaTech .... Hexfuel .... Hibernaid ... High Impact Environmental ... High Performance Technologies ... High Point Pharmaceuticals ..... Histogen ... Histogenics ... HistoRx ....HistoSonics ... Hitite Microwave ...HJM Precision ... HocusLocus .... Hoku Scientific ... Holaira .... Hollingsworth & Vose .... Hollis-Eden Pharmaceuticals ... Holomni .... Homology Medicine ..... Honeycomb Battery ..... Hontek ... Hoopers Island Oyster Aquaculture ... Hoppe Tool ... Hsiri Therapeutics ..... HTG Molecular ..... HTSS ... Humacyte ... Humanetics .... Human Genome Sciences ... Human Metabolome Technologies ... HuTerra .... Huya Bioscience International ..... ..... Hybrivet ...HYCOR Biomedical ... Hydra Biosciences ... HydroCision ... Hydrogen Safety ... HydroLogic Industries ... Hygeia Therapeutics ... HyperBranch Medical Technologies ... Hyperion Therapeutics ... HyperMed ... Hypres ... Hy-SyEnce


G1 Therapeutics (Chapel Hill, NC)

G1 Thera up 20% [Sep 6, 17]

G1 Thera up 12% [Aug 21, 17]

G1 Thera up 12% [Aug 17, 17]

G1 Thera up 11% [Aug 15, 17]

G1 Therapeutics up 11% [May 18, 17]

G1 Therapeutics (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR, 31 employees) announced the pricing of its initial public offering for aggregate gross proceeds of $105M. ...  developing novel, small-molecule therapies that address significant unmet needs in the treatment of cancer. The company is advancing a pipeline of potential best-in-class and first-in-class drug candidates in multiple oncology indications.  [company press release, May 16, 17]  The company’s revenues have so far only come from government grants related to research.  [Zachery Eanes, Raleigh News & Observer, May 17, 17]

G1 Therapeutics (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR) filed [IPO] to raise up to $115 million.  [Triad Business Journal, Apr 14, 17] completed a $47 million Series C financing in 2016 [company press release, May 2016] a $33 million Series B financing in 2015 [company press release, Feb 2015]  developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. Our two clinical-stage candidates – trilaciclib and G1T38 – are potent, selective inhibitors of the validated kinase targets CDK4/6. [company website]

G1 Therapeutics (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR) , After raising $50 million last year [Jennifer Henderson. Triangle Business Journal, Jan 11, 17]   a clinical-stage oncology company, announced the expansion of its pipeline of novel cancer therapies with the initiation of three development programs in breast cancer. G1 is enrolling a Phase 2 study of its intravenous CDK4/6 inhibitor trilaciclib for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and a Phase 1b/2a study of its oral CDK4/6 inhibitor G1T38 for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative (ER+, HER2-) breast cancer.  [company press release, Jan 10, 17]

VC awards in  the [NC] Triangle:  G1 Therapeutics (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR) an oncology drug developer raised $47 million in Series C funding in May; Spyryx Biosciences, (Durham, NC; no SBIR)  a lung disease therapy developer $4.5 million;   T3D Therapeutics  (Research Triangle Park, NC; $1.8M SBIR), an Alzheimer’s disease therapy developer $3 million; and Advanced Animal Diagnostics, (Morrisville, NC; one SBIR) livestock farming diagnostics company $1.8 million.      [John Murawski, Raleigh News & Observer, Jul 15, 16]

G1 Therapeutics (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR) , a UNC-Chapel Hill spinout developing cancer treatments,    announced  the completion of a $47 million Series C financing to advance the clinical development of its lead CDK4/6 inhibitors, G1T28 and G1T38, and to expand its pipeline in multiple oncology indications  [company press release, May 11, 16]

G1 Therapeutics  (Research Triangle Park, NC;  SBIR) developing drugs to protect cancer patients from chemotherapy side effects, kicked off two trials to study its compound in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). ...  received $500,000 from the N.C. Biotechnology Center, a state taxpayer-supported economic development group, ...  raised $33M in February [Jason deBruyn, Triangle Business Journal, Aug 11, 15]

UNC-Chapel Hill spinout G1 Therapeutics ( RTP,  NC; no SBIR) is becoming a darling in the Triangle's pharma scene. About a year after it raised $12.5 million, it announced that it raised another $33 million ...   think they found a way to manipulate the cell cycle to protect bone marrow during chemotherapy treatments. When treating cancer, chemotherapy will kill a tumor, but often also kill many of the healthy cells in a body as well. G1's intravenous drug would pause the cell cycle at a point when the cells naturally have a very strong defense shield and can withstand chemotherapy treatments on their own. If G1 can successfully prove this therapy, it could become a breakthrough in cancer treatments as it would allow doctors to administer chemotherapy to kill a tumor but still protect healthy bone marrow.   [Jason deBruyn, Triangle Business Journal, Feb 5, 15]  

G1 Therapeutics  (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR, founded 2008) raised $33 million in its second round of funding ... previously raised $12.5 million in 2013. ... is developing G1T28 to stop certain cancer cells from replicating. For cancers resistant to G1T28, the agent can be used to protect the bone marrow from damage by chemotherapy.   [John Murawski, Raleigh News & Observer, Feb 5, 15]

G-1 Therapeutics (Chapel Hill, NC; no SBIR) oncology startup just netted $12.5 million in series A financing, a potential boon for both cancer patients and investors in the small company.  ...    is developing a compound to protect bone marrow from chemotherapy treatments. [Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Oct 16, 13]

G1 Therapeutics (Chapel Hill, NC; no SBIR) startup that aims to commercialize technology developed at UNC-Chapel Hill, has raised $600,000 to accelerate its drug-development efforts. ....  just three full-time employees whose work is supplemented by contractors and by outsourcing. [President Jay] Strum is a veteran of 15 years at GlaxoSmithKline, including a stint as a director in the company’s genomics unit.  [David Ranii, Raleigh News & Observer, Sep 18, 12]

G3 Dayton, OH)

G3 (Global Graphene Group, Dayton, OH), a holding company for subsidiaries Angstron Materials  ($150K SBIR) , Honeycomb Battery (no SBIR) and Nanotek Instruments  ($3M SBIR), announced that it has secured the first $10 million of a Preferred Series A investment ... with conditions for a second close of an additional $13 million for a total $23 million Series A investment.  G3 is engaged in commercializing graphene raw materials, and graphene-enabled applications including nanocomposites, thermal interface materials, and advanced batteries.   [Roni Peleg,  www.graphene-info.com, Jul 20, 16]

Galderma

Bioventus (Durham, NC; no SBIR), a global leader in orthobiologic solutions, announced it has received US FDA approval for DUROLANE, a single-injection, hyaluronic acid (HA) product used for joint lubrication in the treatment of pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA). ....  in 2015 acquired BioStructures LLC, a proprietary developer and marketer of bioresorbable bone graft products for a broad range of spinal and orthopaedic surgical applications. ...  Acquired DUROLANE Assets from Galderma (Durham, NC; no SBIR) in 2014  [company press release, Sep 5, 17]

Galena Biopharma (Portland, OR)

Galena Biopharma (formerly RXi Pharmaceuticals (Worcester, MA; $600K SBIR)) now San Ramon, CA) that is developing a cancer vaccine created by a San Antonio researcher, has hired Canaccord Genuity to see if it can sell or merge the company, license its assets to another business, or make some other move to keep the drug research going.  ... has been developing a breast cancer vaccine called NeuVax that’s meant to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of cancer.   [David Holley, xconomy.com, Mar 7, 17]

Galena Biopharma  (Portland, OR; $600K SBIR as RXi Pharma in Worcester, MA), one of the only publicly traded bioscience companies in the Portland area, is packing up and moving to East SF Bay. ...  [had] relocated to the Portland area in Sept. 2011 from Worcester, MA  ....  announced that it plans to shed its current product portfolio — Abstral sublingual tablets and Zuplenz Oral Soluble Film. It will instead focus on its oncology pipeline: the NeuVax breast cancer vaccine it’s developing, as well as another immunotherapy drug, GALE-301.    [Elizabeth Hayes, Portland Business Journal, Nov 11, 15]

Galena Biopharma  (Portland, OR; no SBIR) brand new CEO said the time has come for the biotech company to “transition to a more structured culture,” but plans no major directional changes. ...  developing and commercializing targeted oncology treatments. Schwartz has 30 years of experience in the biotech and science industry. He had served as the CEO of Apthera when it was purchased by Galena in 2011.   Before that, he was CEO of Bayhill Therapeutics, which was developing a DNA vaccine platform to treat autoimmune diseases.   Galena has been wracked by turmoil this year, with allegations of insider trading, investor lawsuits and a pending SEC investigation.    [Elizabeth Hayes, Portland Business Journal, Aug 21, 14]

Galenea (Cambridge, MA)

Galenea (Cambridge, MA; $400K SBIR) won a $4.5 million [NIH stimulus] grant for a technology platform aimed at identifying compounds to treat schizophrenia. ... received its first NIH Challenge Grant last October for technology used in measuring in vivo biomarkers to predict treatments for impaired cognition diseases.  [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Oct 14, 10]

Galera Therapeutics (Malvern, PA;

Galera Therapeutics (Malvern, PA; no SBIR) bumped up its series B financing to $57 million, thanks to a $15 million investment from new investor.  ... will be used to prepare the Company’s lead product candidate, GC4419, for Phase 3 registration studies. GC4419 is currently in a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 2b clinical trial to evaluate its effects on the incidence, duration and intensity of severe oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemo-radiation therapy.   [company press release, Nov 28, 16]

Galera Therapeutics  (Malvern, PA; no SBIR), a clinical-stage biotech developing new treatments for cancer patients, announced it has received an additional $5 million in funding to bring its Series B financing total to $42 million. ... to advance the Company’s lead candidate GC4419 in a Phase 2b double-blind, randomized clinical trial that is currently enrolling head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiation therapy to prevent against oral mucositis (OM). [company website, Feb , 6]

Galera Therapeutics (Malvern, PA; no SBIR) biotech company developing new treatments for cancer patients, completed a $37 million [series B venture capital financing].  ... to advance its pipeline of experimental anti-cancer therapies included its lead candidate, GC4419, which is in early-stage testing, GC4419 is under development as a potential treatment for preventing oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiation therapy. [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Oct 14, 15]

Cultivation Capital has invested just short of $11 million of the $20 million tech fund it created in 2012.   ...  started out as a tech fund, created its life sciences fund in 2013 with plans to invest some $30 million over five years.  ....  its portfolio: Immunophotonics (Columbia, MO; no SBIR) developed a cancer vaccineMolecular Sensing  (Nashville, TN; no SBIR) commercializing a label-free molecular interaction assay system based on Back-Scattering InterferometryAdarza BioSystems (WEST HENRIETTA, NY; $1.8M SBIR) early stage medical diagnosticsCardialen (Minneapolis, MN; no SBIR) developed a treatment to keep the heart in a normal rhythm for people suffering from atrial fibrillation (AF)Euclises Pharmaceuticals (St Louis, MO; no SBIR) developing pain and cancer medications; Mobius Therapeutics (St Louis, MO; no SBIR) commercial stage venture focused on ophthalmic surgery solutions; Pulse Therapeutics (St. Louis, MO; no SBIR) developed a new approach to accelerate the concentration and delivery of physician-selected agents within the vasculature; Galera Therapeutics (Malvern, PA; no SBIR) focused on the development of breakthrough drugs targeting the oxygen metabolic pathways.  [Brian Feldt, St. Louis Business Journal, Oct 27, 14]   

Galera Therapeutics (Malvern, PA; no SBIR) raised $11 million in a first round of venture capital financing. ... focused on developing new drug candidates that target oxygen metabolic pathways in cancer, fibrosis and other human diseases.   [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Dec 11, 12]

Galil Medical (St Paul, MN)

Galil Medical (Arden Hills, MN; no SBIR, 100 employees) medical device firm is being acquired for about $85 million by a London-based BTG PLC group, manufacturer of medical technology and specialty pharmaceuticals.  ....   will pay $84.5 million in cash for , plus up to $25.5 million in future regulatory and revenue milestone payments, according to an announcement from the companies.  ....  makes “cryoablation” technology used in interventional oncology procedures. The company moved from Israel to Arden Hills in 2009.  [Christopher Snowbeck, Minneapolis Star Tribune, May 7, 16]

Galil Medical (St Paul, MN; no SBIR, founded in Israel, under 100 employees) said it's reached a deal to buy Perseon (Salt Lake City, UT; no SBIR) for $10.6 million in a deal that will take the publicly traded Perseon private. ...   Galil, which makes needles that deliver super-chilled gas to freeze and destroy cancer tumors, said in its announcement that the acquisition of Perseon is contingent on Galil raising $26 million in new debt and equity.   ...  Perseon also specializes in cancer-destroying tech, but it uses microwave heat therapy.   [Mark Reilly, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal,  Oct 27, 15]

Galleon Pharmaceuticals (Philadelphia, PA)

Galleon Pharmaceuticals  (Horsham, PA; no SBIR) which is working on new treatments for sleep apnea and related breathing-control disorders which raised $10 million in a series-B round supplemented by $6 million in venture debt  [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Jun 12, 15]

Galleon Pharmaceuticals (Horsham. PA; no SBIR) raised $1.5 million in a equity financing, according to [SEC] documents ... specializing in the development of treatments for sleep apnea and related breathing-control disorders.  [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Nov 21, 13]

Galleon Pharmaceuticals (Philadelphia, PA; no SBIR) raised $15 million in a private financing. [Philadelphia Business Journal, Dec 31, 08]

GAM Enterprises (Prospect, IL)

Companies may encounter challenges as they weigh the pros and cons of producing their goods in the U.S. again. But small firms face particular hurdles: They can’t always attract top talent or find U.S. suppliers that meet their specifications.  ...  Bringing its manufacturing back to the U.S. cost GAM Enterprises (Mt Prospect, IL; no SBIR) nearly $4 million and required technical and financial assistance from Illinois and the U.S. Commerce Department’s Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The company hired a headhunter for the first time in its 26-year history, after struggling to find a machinist who could operate new small-batch production technology. Even then, the new hire required months of on-the-job training. [Ruth Simon and Vipal Monga, Wall Street Journal, Apr 14, 17]  Politcians wish for magic results from glib policies but overlook the economic price to make it happen.

Gamesalad (Texas)

When startup FireFly LED Lighting (Austin, TX; no SBIR) was accepted into the Austin Technology Incubator two years ago, its LED bulbs were still prototypes.  Since then, the company has launched its product line, signed customers including Kerbey Lane Cafe and the University of Texas and received $3.4 million from backers including the Central Texas Angel Network and the Texas Emerging Technology Fund.....  Since its founding in 1989 by legendary business leader George Kozmetsky, ATI has worked with more than 200 startups, helping them raise nearly $1 billion in investment capital.  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American Statesman, Jan 26, 12]  Graduates: Agile Planet,  Atomometrics, Axelo, Calxeda, Dorsan Biofuels, Famigo, GameSalad, Ideal Power Converters, Itzbig, Nitero, Notice Technologies, Open Algae, Qcue, RFMicron, RRE Solar,  Savara Pharmaceuticals, Spredfast, Terapio ($500K  SBIR), Unwired Nation, WiMax.com. 

Gamma Medica Ideas (Northridge, CA)

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state stem cell agency, has awarded $1B so far in research money.  SBIR companies got $10M of it.  Bio Time (Berkeley, CA; $300K SBIR)  $4.7M;   Vistagen Therapeutics (Burlingame, CA; $600K SBIR)  $970K; Gamma Medica Ideas  (Northridge, CA; $2.8M SBIR) $950K;Vala Sciences (San Diego, CA; $3M SBIR)  $900K; Invitrogen (Carlsbad, CA; $4M SBIR) $870K SBIR;  Fluidigm (South San Francisco, CA: $1.2M SBIR) [CIRM press release, Oct 28]

Garland Technology (Buffalo, NY)

Network tap manufacturer Garland Technology LLC (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR) is looking to add staff as it grows its business globally. ...  makes products at its Richardson, Texas facility  ...  About a year ago, the company opened a branch office in Frankfurt, Germany.  Network taps are hardware devices that provide ways to access data flowing across a computer network.   [ David Bertola,Buffalo Business First, Sep 16, 15]

Garwood Medical Devices (Buffalo, NY)

Garwood Medical Devices (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR, founded 2014)  closing in on a $3.6 million Series A round from private investors  ...  is a 43North semifinalist and is in the Start-Up NY tax breaks program.  [Dan Miner, Buffalo Business First , Aug 19, 16]    medical device startup intends to create 40 jobs over five years through a partnership with a University at Buffalo genomic research program, the university announced.  ... develops devices to treat chronic wounds and control joint-replacement infections, will receive $1.48 million in support from UB’s Buffalo Institute for Genomics and Data Analytics.  [Stephen T. Watson, Buffalo News, Jul 29, 16]

GATR Technologies (Huntsville, AL

Cubic Corp. is buying two privately held technology companies for a combined $271.5 million, boosting the San Diego firm’s satellite communications expertise for government customers....  GATR Technologies (Huntsville, AL; $3M SBIR, 75 employees) [makes portable satellite-dish systems] and TeraLogics (Ashburn, VA; no SBIR) [provides a repository for surveillance video]  [Mike Freeman, San Diego Union Tribune, Dec 21, 15]

G-Con (Texas)

The DARPA effort, called Blue Angel, has been working since May 2009 to develop a surge capacity for flu viruses ....      Four companies are working to transform protein-producing tobacco plants from a proof of concept to a demonstration of the capability. The next step will be to develop full industrial processes for producing the proteins. The companies are Fraunhofer USA Center for Molecular Biotechnology in Delaware, Kentucky BioProcessing (Owensboro, KY; no SBIR, bought by Reynolds Tobacco Jan 2014), a consortium called Project GreenVax, whose partners are the Texas A&M University system and a Texas company called G-Con, and Medicago USA in North Carolina. [Cheryl Pellerin, American Forces Press Service]   In 2009  DARPA, launched Blue Angel, a program that challenged three tobacco pharming facilities—among them,  and Caliber Biotherapeutics (Bryan, TX; no SBIR) —to produce 10 million doses of flu vaccine in one month. The reward? Tens of millions in funding. [Erika Fry, Fortune, Sep 22, 2014]

Gecko Biomedical (France)

The latest company cofounded by the prolific MIT scientist and entrepreneur Robert Langer has raised $11 million to advance work on a new kind of surgical adhesive technology.  The startup called Gecko Biomedical (France, founded 2013) grew out of the Langer Lab at the MIT. It aims to bring its biodegradable glues and patches to market in the next few years for surgeons to close up wounds after operations.  [Michael Farrell, Boston Globe, Dec 10, 13]

Gel Combs (Madison, WI)

Five bioscience companies winners of [Wisconsin] BIOforward’s 2014 Emerging Company Showcase. ... chosen because they have transitioned successfully out of research and development, with good proof of concept for their products.  BioTechnique  (Madison, WI; no SBIR) will make cancer-fighting drugs and other types of drugs for other companies; Cellara (Madison, WI; no SBIR) working on a small-platform modular robotic system for use in stem cell production;
Gel Combs (Madison, WI; no SBIR) designs and makes improved combs for gel electrophoresis applications as well as custom plastic parts for the microscopy and microbiology industries; Kosmetikos (Marshfield, WI; no SBIR) a skin care company start-up; and Organic Research (Milwaukee, WI; no SBIR) develops digital pathology software tools to provide critical decision support to pathologists by automatically identifying disease markers.   The winning companies receive high-visibility exhibit space at the Oct. 8 Bioscience Vision Summit, recognition at one of the summit’s large plenary sessions, a free year of membership in BIOforward, and specialized one-on-one technical assistance ranging from business planning and investor introductions to collaborative partnerships.  ...   BioForward was founded in 1987, as the Wisconsin Biotechnology Association, a partnership among leaders in Wisconsin’s emerging biotechnology industry.   [Bob Van Enkenvoort, Wisconsin State Journal, Sep 26, 14]

Gelesis

Gelesis (Boston, MA; no SBIR) announced it’s raised $12 million in new funding to further develop a pill to treat the physiological symptoms of hunger.  The treatment, Gelesis100, offers an alternative to surgery and other invasive procedures, the firm said. It has so far gone through a series of clinical, preclinical, and in vitro studies, according to Gelesis....    Gelesis has now raised $42 million to date.  [Kyle Alspach, betaboston.com, May 16, 14]

Gelesis reports it has raised $16 M in its first round of venture financing to advance its treatment for obesity. Yet founders of the firm aren't releasing details about the company's technology. Gelesis was formed in 2006 with technology developed, and still manufactured, in Israel,  [Mass High Tech, Jan 3, 08]

Geltech (Orlando, FL)

Geltech Bought (Aug 28) LightPath (Albuquerque, NM) says it will buy Geltech (Orlando, FL) for $27.5M plus $1.7M debt. Geltech manufactures precision-molded aspherical optics, which couple laser diode sources to fibers or waveguides for telecom applications. The company also makes sol-gel waveguides and recently launched a range of diffractive gratings and lens arrays for DWDM multiplexing - a market estimated to be worth USD 3.3 billion by 2003. Geltech got its start in sol-gel processing from Star Wars before it got any SBIR. Since 1987 Geltech has had only three Phase 2 SBIRs (two from BMDO).

GelTech 5-Yr Deal GelTech 5-Yr Deal  Geltech (Orlando, FL) announced a five year $manyM deal (biggest ever) to supply "micro lenses" to Seagate Technology, the world's largest maker of computer disk drives. Geltech has 95 employees, up from 40 a year ago. The technology uses lasers, fiber optics and tiny precision lenses to create high-density electronic storage in disk drives. Seagate said that Geltech has been instrumental in making the new technology possible. Geltech develops lenses -- no larger than the head of a pin -- that focus laser light with extraordinary precision. [Orlando Bus Journal, Mar 9] Geltech has had about $2.5M of DOD SBIR and had early money while still a university effort from StarWars research for its solgel lens technology and 1987 Phase 2 from AFOSR which was SDI's agent at the time for that technology under Don Ulrich (deceased). In those days, SDI was intensely interested in new technology since it didn't take SDI long to figure out that an anti-missile defense could not be built from the normal incremental technology improvements in military R&D. Its second Phase 2 was from BMDO in 1993. (SBA doesn't provide a government-wide search.)

Gema Diagnostics (Ann Arbor, MI)

the Michigan Economic Development Corporation announced its new Michigan Venture Match Fund, a $5 million pot of money from the Michigan Strategic Fund for early-stage companies in the state that have already gotten funding commitments from at least one venture firm. The fund just invested $2.76 million in six companies across a variety of sectors:Stik (social networking website, no SBIR), Livio (internet car radios, no SBIR), Amplifinity (manage advocacy programs; no SBIR), Gema Diagnostics (Ann Arbor, MI; no SBIR, human embryo screening), nanoRETE  (Lansing, MI; no SBIR, real-time detection of pathogens), and Tissue Regeneration Systems (Ann Arbor, MI; no SBIR, bone reconstruction). [Sarah Schmid, xconomy.com, Mar 12, 13]

GEMFIRE (Palo Alto, CA)

Gemfire gets big backers. Integrated-optical-component maker Gemfire (Palo Alto, CA) has raised more than $63M in its Series C round of funding from a variety of blue chip and venture investors, including Cisco Systems, Corning, Finisar, Intel Capital, and TriQuint Semiconductor. This brings the total investment in the new company to date to more than $85M. Gemfire's new products integrate passive and active functions on one optical chip. [Laser Focus World, March 16]

Gemfire for Bright Displays
(Palo Alto, CA) will exploit Deacon Research's polymeric thin panel display for low-cost direct-view, 100-inch displays for a $100B market. To get its high brightness, flexibility, efficiency, ruggedness, and viewing angle, laser light is guided to the display pixels in a thin film on a plastic substrate, using an array of optical waveguide switches. The use of polymer based materials allows the display to be extremely rugged and shock resistant, flexible, paper-thin and featherweight, and for applications requiring the viewer to "see through" the display to be transparent. GEMFIRE will manufacture display systems for special low volume applications and then license the technology to a few strong partner companies. Deacon had several BMDO SBIR's with a growing match ratio after graduating from the Free-Electron laser business.

Gemin X Pharmaceuticals (Malvern, PA)

Gemin X Pharmaceuticals  (Malvern, PA; no SBIR) a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing cancer therapeutic products, raised $8 million in a private stock sale ...  developing cancer therapeutics based on reinitiating programmed forms of cell death that inhibit metabolism in cancerous cells.   .....   [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Aug 5, 10]

Gemmus Pharma (San Francisco, CA)

Gemmus Pharma (San Francisco, CA; no SBIR), a five-person startup that is developing drugs to treat the flu, is one of the companies subleasing space from FibroGen  [Tom Abate, San Francisco Chronicle, Jul 15, 09]

Gemphire Thera (Northville, MI)

Gemphire Thera up 10% [Oct 27, 17]

Gemphire Thera down 11% [Aug 7, 17]

Gemphire Thera (Livonia, MI; no SBIR) down 47% [Aug 7, 17] “In ROYAL-1, gemcabene met the primary endpoint and demonstrated a statistically significant lowering in LDL-C, although the magnitude of LDL-C lowering was less than observed in certain prior studies of gemcabene,” stated Dr. Lee Golden, Chief Medical Officer.   [company press release, Aug 7, 17]

Gemphire Thera up 10% [Jul 13, 17]

Gemphire Thera up 10% [Apr 10, 17]

Gemphire Thera up 12% [Mar 22, 17]

Gemphire Thera up 11% [Jan 6,17]

Gemphire Thera up 10% [Nov 7, 16]

Gemphire Thera up 11% [Sep 22, 16]

Gemphire Thera (Northville, MI; no SBIR) up 17% [Aug 31, 16]   IPO was Aug 5

Gemstone Biotherapeutics ((Baltimore, MD)

startup Gemstone Biotherapeutics (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR)  raised $1.6 million as it races to bring to market a synthetic material for healing wounds. ...  developing a synthetic version of tissue scaffolding, a thin film of cells that doctors apply to a wound to encourage skin and tissue to regrow. ...  Wound care is a $15 billion market expected to grow to $18 billion by 2019, according to analysis by global research firm MarketandMarket. ... brings Gemstone’s total seed funding to $2.45 million   [Sarah Gantz, Baltimore Business Journal, Jun 10, 15]

Gen9

Agilent has made a $21 million investment in Gen9 (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR, founded 2009)  specializing in gene synthesis. Customers can potentially use Gen9’s technology to more efficiently make everything from fabrics and chemicals to drugs and renewable fuels. [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Apr 24, 13]

Stealthy synthetic biology startup Gen9 (no SBIR) has bumped up a previously disclosed financing, taking in $1.96 million of a planned $2.5 million debt offering, [Michelle Lamg, Mass High Tech, Apr 29, 11]

Genaera (NYC, NY)

MacroChem (Wellesley Hills, MA; three SBIRs) has purchased the license to a treatment for diabetic foot infection. MacroChem executives report the company has exercised an option to acquire exclusive worldwide license rights for pexiganan, a novel, small peptide anti-infective, from New York City-based Genaera Corp (three SBIRs). [Mass High Tech, Oct 4, 07]

Genalyte (San Diego, CA)

Genalyte (San Diego, CA; no SBIR, 40 employees)  biomedical company, said it has raised $44 million from venture capital firms [to] help Genalyte commercialize its diagnostics system, which produces test results in minutes from one drop of blood. ... now markets the Maverick system to drug companies as a research tool, but it's not approved for clinical testing.  [Bradley Fikes, utsandiego.com, Aug 18, 15]

 A race to detect Ebola:

  • [FDA] authorized emergency use of BioFire (Salt Lake City, UT; no SBIR)’s FilmArray system to diagnose Ebola in U.S. hospitals and military labs.   ...  uses PCR [polymerase chain reaction] technology, but can deliver results in about one hour on the premises of any treatment facility that has one of the machines, which cost around $39,000 apiece.  ...  Many U.S. hospitals already have the machines, which were approved to diagnose pathogens including those causing gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases.   
  • Corgenix Medical (Denver, CO; $600K SBIR) is speeding up development of a portable Ebola test kit designed to deliver results from a drop of blood in about 10 minutes, said [CEO] Doug Simpson. It uses so-called “lateral-flow” technology, which is similar to that found in a home pregnancy test, and doesn’t require electricity or a machine to process the sample. A paper strip displays one blue line if no virus is detected, two blue lines if virus is detected, and no lines if the test didn’t work properly.  ...  Corgenix is working with Tulane University in New Orleans and other partners in the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Consortium, with funding from the NIH. ..  Researchers are testing the Corgenix device, including in West Africa, but haven’t yet gathered enough data to apply for approval by either FDA or WHO, said Mr. Simpson.  
  • Chembio Diagnostics Systems (Medford, NY; no SBIR) maker of rapid diagnostics for HIV and syphilis, this week formed a partnership with another company, Integrated BioTherapeutics (Gaithersburg, MD;  $1.1M SBIR), to develop a point-of-care test for Ebola. Chembio plans to use substances known as “reagents,” developed by Integrated BioTherapeutics, for the test. Chembio hopes to begin testing the tool in Africa within months, said Chief Executive John Sperzel. 
  • Genalyte (San Diego, CA;  no SBIR) developing an Ebola diagnostic that uses a silicon chip to test a drop of blood drawn with a pinprick. The chip is processed through a 15-inch-wide machine that delivers results in about 10 minutes, said Genalyte Chief Executive Cary Gunn.  
  • OraSure Technologies (Bethlehem, PA; no SBIR), maker of an oral test for HIV, is exploring whether it can develop a rapid oral test for Ebola, said Chief Executive Douglas Michels. Chembio’s Mr. Sperzel said his company also would consider developing an oral Ebola test.     [Peter Loftus, Wall  Street Journal, Nov 5, 14]

Genalyte  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR)recently introduced its first diagnostic assay for connective-tissue autoimmune diseases, with a focus on lupus.... a founder Dr. [Cary] Gunn received his PhD from Caltech in Electrical Engineering.  Prior to Caltech, Dr. Gunn was an officer in the US Air Force, responsible for launching GPS satellites and is a graduate of the US Air Force Academy. ...  raised $11.8 million Series B financing in March 2012 [company website]  [Technology Innovator star under 35] Ryan Bailey, a chemist at the University of Illinois, developed a silicon testing chip that fuses optical sensor technology with semiconductor fabrication methods....  In 2007 Bailey helped launch Genalyte  [Technology Review, S/O12]

Genapsys (Redwood City, CA)

Genapsys (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) said it has raised $37 million to help commercialize a DNA sequencing system it has developed. .... goal is to produce a system that can sequence a genome at a cost of about $50 with an accuracy of more than 99.7 percent. [Cromwell Schubarth, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Nov 14, 13]

GenAudio (Centennial, CO)

[SEC] is suing GenAudio (Centennial, CO; no SBIR, founded 2013) and its CEO, alleging in the suit that they engaged in a fraudulent scheme by falsely telling investors that the company was about to be acquired by Apple Inc. ...  claimed to be developing three-dimensional audio technology, according to the lawsuit. ... The lawsuit says Mahabub told investors the company was in advanced negotiations with Apple.  [Monica Mendoza,Denver Business Journal, Sep 29, 15]

Gene by Gene (Houston, TX)

Gene by Gene (Houstin, TX; no SBIR) and Myriad Genetics reached an agreement to settle litigation regarding gene-related patents. The agreement requires Gene by Gene to stop selling or marketing clinical diagnostic tests that include analysis of the BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes as a standalone test or in conjunction with gene panes — but only in North America.  [Olivia Pulsinelli, Houston Business Journal, Feb 11, 14]

Gene by Gene [Houston, TX; no SBIR) said it acquired startup company Arpeggi (Austin, TX; no SBIR, founded 2012), hoping to accelerate the availability of affordable genetics testing and diagnostic services.  Gene by Gene Ltd. sells and processes mail-in test kits for people interested in tracing their ancestry.  [Bayan Raji,Houston Business Journal, Aug 7, 13]

Myriad Genetics is suing competitors [Ambry (Viejo, CA; no SBIR) and Gene by Gene (Houston, TX; no SBIR)] that have begun to offer genetic testing for breast cancer risk after the Supreme Court’s ruling last month that human genes cannot be patented.  ....  saying their tests infringed some of the more than 500 other patent claims that were not invalidated by the Supreme Court  [Andrew Pollack, New York Times, Jul 10, 13]

GeneCentric Diagnostics (Durham, NC)

The startup GeneCentric Diagnostics (Durham, NC; no SBIR) nabbed $2.5 million in new equity financing, according to a securities filing. .... toward further developing the technology GeneCentric licensed from the UNC-Chapel Hill. [Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Jul 3, 13]

Genelabs Technologies (Redwood City, CA)

GlaxoSmithKlineentered into a definitive agreement to buy Genelabs Technologies (Redwood City, CA; $3.5M SBIR)  for $57 million. [Pittsburgh Business Times, Oct 30, 08]  The stock traded as high as 15 in 2004 and under a buck recently.

Gene Logic (Gaithersburg MD)

Gene Logic(Gaithersburg MD; no SBIR) is selling its genomics business for $10M to Ocimum Biosolutions (Hyderabad, India with US HQ in Indianapolis) [Indianapolis Star, Oct 17, 07]  founded 1994; $24M IPO 1997; $248M public stock offering 2000 [company website]; current market cap $33M; total loss for last three years $130M.

General Compression (Newton, MA)

energy storage firm General Compression (Newton, MA; no SBIR) has raised $20.4 million in a Series B round,  [Kyle Alspach, Mass High Tech, Jun 3, 11]

New England energy stimulus money for small biz:  $2.2 million for an energy storage project at Beacon Power  .... $2.1M for Proton Energy (Wallingford, CT; $1.7M SBIR) and Penn State University aim to develop an advanced energy storage device that incorporates a regenerative fuel cell  ....  General Compression, (Newton , MA; no SBIR)  $750K for a novel compressed air energy storage process [Kyle Alspach, Mass High Tech, Jul 13, 10]

General Compression (Newton, MA; no SBIR) said that it has added $3 million to a Series A funding round. ... uses air compression to store energy from wind farms when they produce more power than needed, and release energy during times of peak demand or when the wind is not blowing. The compressed air is pumped into and stored in large underground areas such as salt domes. ..  founded in 2006 and raised $9.9 million in funding in 2007, according to filings.  [Mass High Tech, May 12, 10]  Not exactly high tech,  purely economics-based business risk, which should not be a federal concern.

General Pneumatics (Scottsdale, AZ)

Steve Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council, will be helping to set policy for a national discussion of technology businesses as the chairman of the Technology Councils of North America  .... was General Manager of General Pneumatics  (Scottsdale, AZ;   $3.8M SBIR in 1980s and 1990s) ...  became President & CEO of the Pittsburgh Technology Council and the Southwestern Pennsylvania Industrial Re-source Center (SPIRC) in April 2000.  [Hayley Ringle, Phoenix Business Journal, Aug 16, 13]

Generex Biotechnology (Worcester, MA)

Biotech drugmaker Generex Biotechnology (Worcester, MA; no SBIR) reported positive results for a mid-stage study of its experimental cancer vaccine.  [AP, Dec 15, 09]

Gene Security Network (now Natera) (San Carlos, CA)

Natera (San Carlos, CA; $4M SBIR as Gene Security Network) announced that it has completed a $54.6 million financing round to support the expansion and continued global rollout of Natera’s non-invasive prenatal test, Panorama™  ....   raised $20 million in funding in January 2012   [Business Wire press release, May 1, 13]

GeneSegues Therapeutics (Chaska, MN)

GeneSegues Therapeutics (Chaska, MN; no SBIR) a leader in the targeted delivery of RNAi and DNA therapeutics in cancer and infectious disease , announced today that it has been awarded a $1 million [NIH SBIR Phase II] to continue development of GeneSegues’ novel nanoencapsulated RNAi cancer therapeutic that targets primary and metastatic tumors.  [company press release, Nov 10, 14]

Genesis Laboratories (Wellington, CO)

Genesis Laboratories (Wellington, CO; $500K SBIR) says it has received a $5.2 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop new methods to control a parasite-caused disease in India.  [Denver Business Journal, Apr 24, 09]

GeneSystems (Rockville, MD)

20/20 Gene Systems recently received $4.5 million Series A equity funding from Ping An Ventures and other investors. ... to tweak its lung cancer test to cater to consumers in the Chinese market. CEO  Cohen is also considering taking 20/20 public later this year. [Washington Business Journal, Feb 16, 16]  But what is shaping up to be a largely barren season for IPOs. And with the battering technology stocks have suffered in the past couple of weeks, and the dismal performance of technology IPOs in the past couple of years, any idea of a springtime busy with technology offerings may also be wishful thinking. [Heather Somerville, Reuters, Feb 16, 16]

Montgomery County [MD, a competitor for America's richest county] will dole out $500,000 to investors in 10 life sciences companies through its coveted biotech tax credit, a fifth of which will go to backers of diagnostics company DioGenix (Gaithersburg, MD; no SBIR)  ... piggybacks on the $3.5 million in tax credits from the state to those same 46 investors. The incentives are tied to a total $7 million in private biotech investments in the county last year. Also receiving the credits are backers of 20/20 GeneSystems (Rockville, MD; $4.6M SBIR, incl one of $3.3M),  Alper Biotech LLC, American Gene Technologies International Inc., BeneVir Biopharm Inc., ConverGene LLC, Creatv MicroTech (Potomac, MD; $11.6M SBIR)., Rafagen Inc., Sequella (Rockville, MD; $10.3M SBIR). and SynAm Vaccine. [Bill Flook,Washington Business Journal, Feb 28, 14]

Genetesis (Columbus, OH)

More Buffalo subsidy.  Genetesis (Columbus, OH; no SBIR) founded by an 18-year-old Ohio State University student, starts its year of operating in Buffalo, New York, with a $260,000 runway.  ... has developed a machine that changes how metal components are manufactured ...  The Genetesis system is a device to measure electrochemical activity through the skin combined with data analytics comparing the patient profile with known disorders of the body's electrophysiology such as heart arrhythmias to test the effectiveness of drugs and better match treatments with individual patient profiles.  [Carrie Ghose, Columbus Business First,  Oct 311, 14]   Genetesis expects to create 11 new jobs. [Dan Miner,  Buffalo Business First, Jan 28, 15]

Genetic Networks (Miami, FL)

Genetic Networks (Miami, FL; no SBIR) with technology developed at the University of Miami has been funded, the company announced ...  technology aims to accelerate drug discovery and "predictive medicine" received an undisclosed amount of venture capital through the Florida Institute for the Commercialization of Public Research. ..."Our engine is revolutionary in providing a technology that can rapidly move from disease gene to lead compound without the need to develop time consuming and costly high-throughput screens," [CEO] D'Urso said.  [Eleazar David Meléndez, South Florida Business Journal, Nov 11, 15]

Genetix Pharmaceuticals (Cambridge, MA)

gene-therapy company bluebird bio (Cambridge, MA; $550K SBIR as Genetix Pharmahas added Arch Venture Partners to its roster of backers for its latest round that brought in $30 million in financing  ...  raised a total of approximately $75 million, the latest being a $35 million round in 2010 ...  In March, bluebird bio entered into a deal, worth up to $4.2 million, with the French Muscular Dystrophy Association (AFM). The agreement focused on the development of LentiGlobin, a treatment intended for beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Apr 20, 11]

Genetix Pharmaceuticals, (Cambridge, MA; $500K SBIR) focused on gene therapy, announced today that it has completed a $35 million Series B financing.  ... to advance current clinical programs, strengthen platform capabilities, and further expand the team," the company said in a press release.  [Boston Globe, Mar 12, 10]

Geneu

Semiconductor DNA sequencing technology firm DNA Electronics (UK) today announced the completion of its acquisition of rare cell isolation firm nanoMR (Albuquerque, NM; no SBIR,  founded 2007, 25 employees)  for a total cash consideration of $24 million. ...  DNAe's sequencing technology is licensed to Thermo Fisher Scientific and serves as the core of Ion Torrent's next-generation sequencing system. DNAe also licenses the technology to Geneu  [genomeweb.com, Jan 22, 15]    has raised about $30 million since it started   [Dan Mayfield, Albuquerque Business First, Jan 22, 15]  has developed the first system for rapid isolation of rare cells from complex matrices at levels of 1 cell/mL or lower  [company website]

Genex

< thanks to Genex Technologies, a company now owned by Markland Technologies of Providence, RI .. a provider of facial recognition and 3-D imaging technology and intelligent surveillance based in Maryland, will provide Naval center with its OmniEye Cerberus system, a multi-sensor, reconfigurable system designed for long distance infrared and visible detection. [Mass High Tech, Sep 15]  Genex got its early start in 3-D technology with SBIR from, you guessed it, BMDO back in BMDO's venture capital days when founder Jason Geng was one of two employees. In all it has had about $8M in SBIR. Its website claims  nearly 30 employees and impressive annual revenues. Jason no longer appears on either the management team nor the board of advisors  did up until 2004  His name does now show up as a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Before he founded Genex, he was Director of Research and Development at Intelligent Automation, a huge consumer of SBIR, where he won about $800K of DOD SBIR in  the early 90s including a neural network Phase 2 from BMDO.  Markland is a homeland security company with a cross-country history:  incorporated in 1995 as A.P. Sales, Inc. in Colorado, redomiciled to Florida in 1998 under the name of Quest Net Corporation and further changed its name to Markland Technologies, Inc. in 2001 in Ridgefield, CT.  The stock trades for a nickel a share.

Genia Technologies

Swiss giant Roche has put cash into Stratos Genomics (Seattle, WA; no SBIR) to help develop Stratos’s nanopore sequencing technology, which aims for highly sensitive DNA analysis by screening single molecules. ....  follows Roche’s $125 million upfront purchase of another nanopore sequencing technology firm, Genia Technologies  (no SBIR), earlier this month  [Alex Lash, xcononmy.com, Jun 26, 14]

GenMark Diagnostics (Carlsbad, CA )

GenMark Diagnostics (Carlsbad, CA; no SBIR, 130 employees) said it plans to offer $60 million in shares in a secondary offering. The biotech company provides molecular diagnostic testing systems.  .... reported a net loss of $8 million for the quarter. In the same quarter a year ago, GenMark lost $5.6 million  [Bradley Fikes, utsandiego.com, Aug 12, 13]

Genoa Pharmaceuticals (Seattle, WA)

Genoa Pharmaceuticals  (Seattle, WA; no SBIR), focused ondevelopment of improved therapies for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and other severe pulmonary indications, announced the completion of a $62 million Series A financing. [company press release, May 15, 17]

Genocea Biosciences (Cambridge,MA)

Genocea Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR, founded 2006) down 77% [Sep 26, 17]  a biopharmaceutical company discovering and developing novel vaccines and immunotherapies targeting T cell antigens, announced a strategic shift to immuno-oncology and a focus on the development of neoantigen cancer vaccines, including GEN-009, its lead candidate for which it expects to file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application by early 2018. Genocea also announced it is exploring strategic alternatives for GEN-003, its Phase 3-ready investigational immunotherapy for the treatment of genital herpes. Consequently, Genocea is ceasing GEN-003 spending and activities and is reducing its workforce by approximately 40 percent. [company press release, Sep 25, 17]

Genocea Biosciences down 15% [Aug 9, 17]

Genocea Biosci up 15% [Jul 24, 17]

Genocea Bioscience up 12% [Mar 7, 17]

Genocea Biosciences down 10% [Feb 16,17]

Genocea Biosciences up 12% [Oct 13, 16]

Genocea Biosciences  said an early look at the latest study of its experimental genital herpes vaccine yielded positive results, but questions still remain for the company to answer going forward. Phase 3 trials should start next year. [Ben Fidler, xconomy.com, Sep 28, 16]

Genocea Thera down 12% [Sep 29, 16]

Genocea Biosciences up 11% [Aug 5, 16]

Genocea BioSci  up 15% [Jun 28, 16]

Genocea Bio  up 27% [Jun 23, 16]

Genocea Bio  up 18% [May 31, 16]

Genocea Bio up 11% [May 20, 16]

Geoncea BioSci up 10% [May 17, 16]

Genocea Biosciences down 15% [Apr 11, 16]

Genocea Biosciences up 15% [Apr 4, 16]

Genocea Biosciences down 23% [Apr 1, 16]

Genocea Biosciences (Cambridge MA;  no SBIR, 87 employees) up 95% [Mar 31, 16]  announced positive 12 month efficacy data from its Phase 2 dose optimization trial evaluating GEN-003 for the treatment of genital herpes.  ...   operates as a clinical stage biotechnology company, which discovers and develops novel vaccines to address infectious diseases. [company website, Mar 31, 16]

Genocea Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) has become the second local biotech to go public this year, ... raised $66 million. .... developing vaccines for fighting diseases including herpes, chlamydia and malaria ....  has raised $73 million in investment since its founding in 2007  [Don Seiffert, Boston Business Journal, Feb 5, 14]

Genocea Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR), advancing T cell vaccines for infectious diseases, said it has raised $30 million in a Series C financing round, bringing its total equity funding to date to $76 million.[Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Oct 10, 12]

Genocea Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) working on novel vaccines for diseases like herpes and malaria, has taken a huge second funding round, pulling in $35 million in Series B financing and adding Johnson & Johnson Development Corp. to its roster of backers. ... In August, Genocea named Chip Clark as chief business officer of the vaccine-focused biotech firm in Cambridge. Clark most recently co-founded Rockville, Md.-based Vanda Pharmaceutical Inc., a pharmacogenetics firm where he served as chief business officer and helped secure more than $220 million in funding and landed a licensing deal with Novartis that brought in $200 million upfront, plus $265 million in milestone payments. Founded in 2006, Genocea raised $23 million in Series A financing in February of 2009.  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Jan 3, 11]

Genomatica (San Diego, CA)

Cells without walls.  Synvitrobio (Berkeley, CA; no SBIR) accelerates bio-discovery through cell-free systems. Synvitrobio's Next Generation Expression platform allows for high-throughput data collection that is real and experimentally validated - not simulation.  ...  At present, Synvitrobio is using its system to test DNA sequences (or, rather, the resulting proteins) to see if they might be worth investigating as antibiotic drugs.  ... Sutro Biopharma  (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) uses a cell-free system to create antibodies for the treatment of cancer.  ... Genomatica (San Diego, CA; $6M SBIR), an established biotechnology firm based, is experimenting with a cell-free system which produces 1,4-butanediol in this way from simple sugars. 1,4-butanediol is a small molecule that is used to make polymers such as Lycra. .... GreenLight Biosciences, (Medford, MA; no SBIR) proposes to use its own cell-free system, also based on E. coli, to produce industrial quantities of an undigestible analogue of ribose, a naturally occurring sugar, for use in zero-calorie beverages  .... the idea of stripping molecular biology down to its bare essentials has an efficiency about it which suggests that, for some applications at least, the utility of the biological cell may have run its course.   [The Economist. May 6, 17

startup TeselaGen Biotechnology (San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) signed a multi-year deal with Genomatica (San Diego, CA; $6.3M SBIR) company that will license TeselaGen's software that uses synthetic biology approaches to build and modify DNA. [Ron Leuty, San Francisco Business Times, Jul 9, 13]

DOE awarded Genomatica (San Diego, CA; $6M SBIR)  up to $5.0 million to deliver an engineered organism and optimized fermentation process to enable the conversion of cellulosic sugars to the valuable industrial chemical, 1,4-butanediol (BDO). [BioFuels Digest, Jun 13, 13]

Genomatica (San Diego, CA; $6.3M SBIR) said it is withdrawing its IPO, and has raised $41.5 million in a Series D round of preferred stock financing  [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy,com, Aug 2, 12]

Genomatica(San Diego, CA; $6.7M SBIR) said the Japanese industrial giant Mitsubishi Chemical has agreed to negotiate “definitive agreements” for a joint commercial operation in Asia, where they plan to use Genomatica’s sustainable biotechnology to produce the key industrial chemical 1,4-butanediol, or BDO. Genomatica has modified a standard strain of E. coli to produce BDO, a so-called intermediate chemical used as a raw material to make spandex clothing, skateboard wheels, car bumpers, dashboards and other resilient plastic materials.  [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Mar 2, 12]  The EPA  gave Genomatica of its five Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards   [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Jun 20, 11]

Genomatica (San Diego, CA; $6.3M SBIR) company that’s developed a green technology for chemical production, has filed with federal regulators for [IPO] .... has corralled about $80 million in venture capital and up to $5 million from the U.S. Department of Energy .... has developed a microorganism-based technology platform for producing chemicals used in industrial production. The platform uses biomass, plants or other renewable, non-petroleum sources as the base material to produce chemicals. Today, these chemicals come mostly from crude oil.     [Mike Freeman, signonsandiego, Aug 29, 11]

Genomatica (San Diego, CA; $6.3M SBIR) biotechnology company, which has developed a microbe that makes chemicals from sugar, is getting a big tryout in the corn belt. ..  is announcing that it plans to begin using corn to produce BDO, a chemical usually made from petroleum. BDO is short for 1,4 butanediol. It is used to make elastic fibers, sneakers and insulation.  The worldwide market is $4 billion [Onell Soto, signonsandiego.com, Mar 16, 11]

Genomatica(San Diego, CA; $6M SBIR) says it has successfully scaled up technology that uses genetically engineered microbes to make 1,4-butanediol (BDO)—a solvent and industrial chemical usually made from crude oil or natural gas ... The venture-backed company founded in 2000 is using biotechnology and renewable raw materials to eliminate energy-intensive industrial processes and petrochemicals in making the key intermediate chemical. ...  has raised a total of $38.5 million (including $15 million in March) from investors   [Bruce Bigelow, signonsandiego.com, Jul 13,10]

Genome Profiling (Newark,DE)

BioAdvance, the operator of a $50 million early stage life sciences fund that work with health-care entrepreneurs in the mid-Atlantic region, invested $2.9 million in companies and technologies targeting human health during fiscal 2016. Among the winners were:   

  • Genome Profiling (Newark, DE; no SBIR)  $100,000 to discover novel epigenetic biomarkers based on its proprietary, genome-wide methylation profiling platform to improve how to treat, diagnose, and predict chronic and life-threatening disease;
  • Mebias Discovery (Philadelphia, PA; no SBIR) $800,000 to launch its platform for identifying biased ligands for next generation GPCR drugs;
  • Enzium (Philadelphia,PA; no SBIR)  $140,000 to develop its proprietary protease assay technology for use in measuring drug levels of the new direct oral anticoagulants in patients;
  • Hsiri Therapeutics (King of Prussia, PA; no SBIR) $70,000 to develop novel siderophore-based antibiotics for hard-to-treat bacteria;
  • RiboNova (Wynnewood, PA;  no SBIR) $175,000 to develop small molecules against novel defective transfer RNA anti-cancer targets and to pursue a clinical trial in mitochondrial diseases.  
[John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Aug 5, 2016]

Genomic Health

Pathway Genomics  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR, founded 2008), known for pushing the boundaries of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, will launch a cancer screening test designed to detect bits of cancer DNA in the blood of otherwise healthy people.  ...  a first in the rapidly developing field of "liquid biopsies," which use gene sequencing technology to screen blood samples for trace amounts of DNA associated with different cancers. ... The cost to consumers begins at $299 to periodically check for DNA in their blood ... Guardant Health and Personal Genome Diagnostics Inc already offer blood tests for cancer patients. Roche-backed Foundation Medicine Inc, Genomic Health Inc, Illumina Inc and Sequenom Inc say they have similar tests in the works. [Julie Steenhuysen, Reuters, Sep 9, 15]

Genomic Health (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) has sought to commercialize a new test for prostate cancer over the past year, and presented some solid clinical data about it last year at the American Urological Association annual meeting. But the service hasn’t truly caught on, partly because the company and the investigators who conducted the key prostate cancer study haven’t yet gotten the results published in a top peer-reviewed journal. [Luke Timmerman, xconomy.com, Feb 14, 14]

Genomic Health down 17% [Nov 8, 12]

Genomic Health  up 16%  [Aug 9, 12] reported moderate revenue growth from its Oncotype DX breast cancer and colon cancer tests which help determine treatment paths for patients.  [motleyfool.com]

Genomic Health  up 12% [Nov 2, 11]

Genomic Health  up 21% [Nov 9, 10]

Genomic Health   down 18% [May 6, 09]

Genomic Health  down 12% [Apr 15, 09]

Genomic Health down 10% [Oct 15, 08]

Genomic Health up 10% [Oct 13, 08]

Genomic Health up 15% [Feb 6, 08] on better than expected financial results.

Genomic Health up 10% [Jan 14, 08]

GenomeQuest (Westborough, MA)

GenomeQuest (Westborough, MA; no SBIR), a developer of sequence data management software for genome-based research, has  received $3.1 million in an offering of equity and warrants ... “There’s been a 10,000-fold increase in the last three years in the volume of data generated per instrument,” said GenomeQuest CEO Ron Ranauro in a June interview with Mass High Tech. “Now we can interrogate every DNA molecule against all known knowledge bases, when before only a fraction could be sequenced.” [Mass High Tech, Dec 16, 09]

Genomind (King of Prussia, PA)

Genetic testing firm Genomind (King of Prussia, PA; no SBIR), personalized medicine company that has developed a genetic test to help clinicians make more informed treatment decisions for patients with depression has raised another $3.5 million in a private stock sale, according to [SEC] documents  ...  with $1.5 million coming in December and $2 million coming this week.  [bignewsnetwork.com, Feb 10, 16]  Veterans and active military personnel are now eligible to receive the Genecept Assay™ (www.genomind.com), a genetic test for mental health that helps patients feel better faster. [company press release, Feb 9, 16]

Genoptix Medical Laboratory (Carlsbad, CA)

An investor group has bought Genoptix (Carlsbad, CA; no SBIR) that conducts testing for blood diseases, from the drug giant Novartis. Novartis had acquired Genoptix in 2011 for $470 million.  Genoptix was founded in 1999 by a team led by San Diego biotech veteran executive Tina Nova, and it held an initial public offering in 2007.   [Bradley Fikes, San Diego Union Tribune, Mar 9, 17]

Genoptix up 26% [Jan 24, 11] as Novartis AG (Swiss) agreed to buy Genoptix (Carlsbad, CA; $1M SBIR), a lab that specializes in diagnosing cancers in bone marrow, blood and lymph nodes, for about $470 million in cash. ... revenue of about $184 million in 2009 and employs about 500 people  [Bloomberg, Jan 24]  Another smart SBIR investment by NIH a decade ago.

Genoptix up 16% [Dec 14, 10]

Genoptix (San Diego, CA; $1M SBIR) was 41st on the new Deloitte Fast 500 list of fastest-growing technology companies [Mike Freeman, signonsandiego, Oct 21, 10]

Genoptix down 11% [Sep 21, 10] said it expects third-quarter revenue and case volumes to decline sequentially due to increasing competition. [Wall Street Journal, Sep 22]

Genoptix down 25% [Jun 16, 10]  after the company cut its 2010 forecast as it gave weaker-than-anticipated earnings estimates for the second quarter. The company said it was hurt by pressure on physician practices and a more competitive market reduced its field-sales productivity. [Wall Street Journal, Jun 17, 10]

Genoptix down 23% [May 7, 10]

Genoptix, (Carlsbad, CA; $1M SBIR) laboratory that helps doctors diagnose certain types of cancer.... has grown rapidly. In a little more than a decade since its founding, it has grown to more than 400 employees with $135.3 million in revenue during the first nine months of last year.... [founder Tina] Nova co-founded San Diego-based life science companies Ligand Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA; one SBIR)and Nanogen  (San Diego, CA; $1M SBIR) [Thomas Kupper, San Diego Union Tribune, Jan 11, 10]

Genoptix  (Carlsbad, CA; $1M SBIR) up 15% [Jul 31, 09]  a lab-service provider, reported second-quarter earnings and revenue above Wall Street estimates and boosted its earnings and revenue guidance for 2009. [Wall Street Journal, Aug 1]

Genoptix (Carlsbad, CA; $1M SBIR), that helps oncologists determine the proper treatment for people with blood cancers, topped a list of the region's fastest-growing companies compiled by the Deloitte & Touche accounting firm. [Terri Somers, San Diego Union-Tribune Oct 11, 08]

Shares of laboratory-services company Genoptix (Carlsbad, CA; $1M SBIR) became the latest in a series of health-care-related companies to post large first-day trading gains, increasing 49% from its IPO price. [Wall Street Journal, Oct 31]

Genoptix Medical Laboratory, (Carlsbad, CA; $1M SBIR) registered for an $86M IPO. [Aug 3, 07]

Genor

Genor up 14% [May 14, 07]  looks born to run ...  the stock market's largest player in embryonic stem cell research -- could feel good long before the company discovers any miracle cures [Melissa Davis, Thestreet.com, May 14]

Genprex (Austin,TX)

Genprex (Austin, TX; no SBIR) a clinical stage gene therapy company, announced that its [IPO was priced to raise] $22M.  .... developing a new approach to treating cancer, based upon a novel proprietary technology platform, including Genprex's initial product candidate, Oncoprex™ immunogene therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).  [company press release, Oct. 13, 2017]

Genprex (Austin, TX; no SBIR) announced that it has signed a Pre IPO-M Management Services Agreement in preparation for Genprex’s shares becoming publicly traded  ...  a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing targeted molecular therapies for cancer. ... Our discoveries and R&D programs have been the subject of more than 30 peer-reviewed publications and have been supported by more than $50 million from investigator grant awards and corporate funding.  [company press release, Mar 23, 16]

A former Texas Emerging Technology Fund official is now on the board of the biotechnology company that received the second-largest non-research grant in the fund’s history and caused controversy three years ago by allegedly circumventing the fund’s normal approval process.  Bob Pearson, a former member of the ETF’s 17-member advisory committee, has joined the board of Genprex (Austin, TX; no SBIR) biopharmaceutical company founded in 2009 as Convergen LifeSciences Inc. by Gov. Rick Perry campaign donor David Nance. [Christopher Calnan, Austin Business Journal, Jan 2, 14]  

Gen-Probe (San Diego, CA)

for $3.7 billion in cash ...  Hologic of Bedford, Mass., said it is buying Gen-Probe  (San Diego, CA; three 1989 Phase I SBIRs), a 29-year-old company known worldwide for its diagnostic tests and equipment. Gen-Probe recently won FDA approval for Progensa, a test that determines if men who have prostate cancer need a biopsy. .... only a week after Ardea Biosciences (San Diego; no SBIR) was purchased by British drug maker AstraZeneca for $1.2 billion. AstraZeneca is moving to replenish its drug pipeline and wanted a diabetes therapy that Ardea developed.    [Gary Robbins, utsandiego.com, Apr 30, 12]

The FDA approved  Gen-Probe (San Diego, CA; three Phase I SBIRs in 1989)’s new diagnostic assay for prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3), which can help doctors determine if repeated prostate biopsies are warranted for men who have elevated of the prostate specific antigen (PSA). While a high PSA level is not a definitive indicator of prostate cancer, Gen-Probe says the PCA3 gene is a biofactor that is typically over-expressed in 95 percent of prostate cancers.  [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Feb 16, 12]

[Swiss giant Novartis] is no longer actively pursuing U.S. medical diagnostic-testing company Gen-Probe  (San Diego, CA; $150K SBIR)., meaning Gen-Probe could end its sales process without a buyer, people familiar with the matter said. Novartis appeared to be the only potential suitor left after other bidders, which included Life Technologies and Thermo Fisher Scientific, dropped out of the race for Gen-Probe last month, these people said. [Gina Chon and Anupreete Das, Wall Street Journal, Jul 20, 11]

medical test makerGen-Probe (San Diego, CA; three SBIRs) said Thursday that it acquired GTI Diagnostics (Waukesha, WI; three SBIRs long ago), a specialty diagnostics company for $53 million in cash.  ... Gen-Probe bought GTI from Riverside Co., a Cleveland private equity firm that acquired the company in 2008. [signonsandiego.com, Dec 16, 10]

GenSpera (San Antonio, TX)

GenSpera (San Antonio, TX; no SBIR) raised $2.5 million in order to continue an ongoing phase 2 study for its treatment, called mipsagargin or G-202. The company says the drug candidate has the potential to treat cancers ranging from brain to liver to prostate.  [Angela Shah,  xconomy.com, Feb 8, 16]

 GenSpera (San Antonio, TX; no SBIR) entered into definitive agreements with institutional investors to further fund clinical studies for its lead asset, mipsagargin, for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme — the most prevalent type of primary brain cancer. ...  novel technology platform combines a powerful, plant-derived cytotoxin (thapsigargin) with a patented prodrug delivery system that targets the release of drugs within solid tumors without the side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.  [Susan Saporito,San Antonio Business Journal, Dec 24, 15]

Genspera (San Antonio, TX; no SBIR, founded 2003, two employees) developing cancer therapies, recently raised $280,000 in equity from a sole unnamed investor, according to [SEC] filing ... completed [IPO] in June that netted $3 million  ... describes itself as an early-stage pharmaceutical company focused on developing prodrug cancer therapeutics to treat solid tumors including liver, brain, prostate and other cancers.  [Tony Quesada, San Antonio Business Journal, Dec 11, 14]

GenSpera (San Antonio, TX; no SBIR) has entered into definitive agreements with investors who are purchasing approximately $3.33 million worth of the biotech company’s common stock and warrants through a registered public offering. ....  is in the research-and-development phase for its lead drug, G-202, which could be used to treat a variety of cancers. The company is currently conducting Phase II clinical trials for G-202.  [W. Scott Bailey, San Antonio Business Journal, May 29, 14]

GenSpera (San Antonio, TX, no SBIR). filed a [SEC] registration  for a public offering. .... to fund Phase II clinical trials of its lead drug G-202 in patients with liver and brain cancer. ... has launched a Phase II clinical trial for G-202 with patients who have glioblastoma multiforme, the most prevalent type of primary brain cancer. The trial will be conducted at the University of California at San Diego’s Moores Cancer Center.  [W. Scott Bailey, San Antonio Business Journal , Mar 21, 14]

drug developer GenSpera (San Antonio, TX; no SBIR) lined up $5 million in private financing with investors and institutional buyers, according to company officials. ...   to carry our G-202 Phase II hepatocellular carcinoma trial through to completion  [Sanford Nowlin, San Antonio Business Journal, Aug 19, 13]

GenSpera (San Antonio, TX; no SBIR) has been awarded two federal grants totaling $489,000 through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to proceed with clinical trials of two of its prospective [oncology] drug candidates. [San Antonio Business Journal, Nov 4. 10]  Hate Obamacare - take the money. Principles are only for political campaigns.

GenTel BioSciences (Madison, WI)

Intuitive Biosciences (Middleton, WI; no SBIR, founded 2012, 4 employees), which makes protein analysis tools for the life sciences industry, has raised $1.3 million of a proposed $2.9 million offering, according to [SEC] filing   [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jun 8, 15]   [bought] many of the assets of Gentel Biosciences (Fitchburg, WI; no SBIR) [which had] bought GlaxoSmithKline’s protein chip technology. [Judy Newman, Wisconsin State Journal, May 16, 2012 ]

Intuitive Biosciences (Fitchburg, WI; no SBIR) that makes protein analysis tools for the life sciences industry, ...  in 2012 acquired certain assets and businesses of Gentel Biosciences  (Madison, WI; no SBIR) biotechnology company. The company has raised $487,000, according to [SEC] filing.  [Kathleen Gallagher , Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug 28, 14]

Gentel Biosciences  (Madison, WI; no SBIR) maker of chips that help researchers test for proteins said Tuesday it has been invited to join a research consortium using novel technologies to gain insight into major diseases of pregnancy.   ... will participate in the development of a protein test with the SCOPE (Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints) Study centers that operate in New Zealand, Australia, the UK and the United States, Gentel said. [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jun 16, 09]

 GenTel BioSciences (Madison, WI; no SBIR) maker of chips that help researchers test for proteins now has a revenue-producing chip on the market. ... after "The product we thought we had, failed in final testing - and a major source of investment dollars ran into some liquidity issues," Vodenlich said. A strategic change was needed  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Oct 17]  Company website says it has been awarded more than $2M in NIH funding for the development of novel protein arrays.

Gentris (Morrisville, NC)

Gentris (Morrisville, NC; no SBIR, 40 employees) that provides applied clinical pharmacogenomics, is being acquired for $4.75 million by Cancer Genetics  (Rurtheford, NJ ; $1.9M SBIR) . ... Gentris has a satellite lab in Shanghai, China  ...  technology that analyzes how a person’s genetic makeup affects how that person responds to drugs. Cancer Genetics specializes in DNA-based cancer diagnostics. The deal is expected to allow Cancer Genetics to combine its genomic-based tests for cancer with Gentris’ personalized medications.  [David Bracken, Raleigh News & Observer, Jun 23, 14]

GenturaDx (Hayward,CA)

Luminex (Austin, TX; $1M SBIR) down 18%  [Jul 9, 12]  after the company said it plans to buy a California biotech company for $50 million.  Luminex, which develops biological testing systems, intends to buy GenturaDx (Hayward, CA; no SBIR), a company that is developing an automated testing system designed to speed molecular diagnostics testing available to hospitals and patients. The California company is expected to have commercial products available in 2014. [Kirk Ladendorf, Austin American Statesman]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD)

An investor in gene therapy company GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $9.5M SBIR) sued the company and its board following a deal inked earlier this year to be acquired by Intrexon (Germantown, MD; no SBIR) ... alleges GenVec issued misleading disclosures in [SEC] filing on March 17  [Washington Business Journal, Apr 17, 17]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $9.5M SBIR) up 45% [Jan 24, 17] Intrexon, a leader in the engineering and industrialization of biology to improve the quality of life and health of the planet, today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire GenVec, a clinical-stage company and pioneer in the development of AdenoVerse(TM) gene delivery technology. [joint companies press release, Jan 24, 17]

GenVec down 15% [Jan 18, 17]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $10M SBIR) down 26% [Jan 11, 17]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $10M SBIR), a gene delivery company that develops therapeutics and vaccines, has signed a deal to license intellectual property and technology developed by two Washington University professors. The exclusive option agreement gives GenVec the rights to intellectual property and technology related to gene editing and pulmonary endothelial cell targeting.  [Brian Feldt, St. Louis Business Journal, Jan 9, 17]

GenVec up 77% [Jan 10, 17]

GenVec up 36% [Jan 9, 17]

GenVec down 11% [Jan 6, 17]

GenVec up 22% [Jan 5, 17]

Gen Vec (Gaithersburg, MD; $10M SBIR) up 11% [Dec 6, 16]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $9M SBIR) will be allowed to get back into researching treatments for hearing and balance disorders [as long as that R&D doesn't include the use of atonal genes] after changing an agreement with business partner Novartis ...  is the creator of the AdenoVerse platform that can deliver genes, including the well-known gene editor CRISPR, to different cells in the body. It's part of a practice called gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease. In 2010, GenVec's lead product candidate for hearing loss was licensed in deal with Novartis that was worth up to $213 million. [Tina Reed, Washington Business Journal, Jan 7, 16]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $9.7M SBIR) down 10% [Oct 1, 15]

GenVec up 14% [Feb 2, 15]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $10M SBIR) up 26% [Jan 8, 15]

GenVec down 16% [May 23, 11]

GenVec (Gaithersburg, MD; $4M SBIR) down 13% agreed to sell $17 million worth of stock and warrants to new and current investors to raise money for operating costs and upcoming clinical trials. [ Baltimore Business Journal, Jun 6, 08]

GenVec dropped 29% after preliminary results from a trial of its TNFerade drug candidate for advanced pancreatic cancer. [Jun 4, 07]

GenWay Biotech (San Diego, CA)

GenWay Biotech (San Diego, CA; one SBIR) has introduced a test it says can detect those patients [most at risk for a heart attack] as much as two to three years in advance. .... [the $95 test] measures three biological markers in the blood that indicate arterial plaque is becoming unstable and may rupture, said CEO Thomas Silberg ....   founded in 1998, employs 15 people   [Bradley Fikes, utsandiego.com, Aug 22, 13]

Genzyme

Genzyme said today that it is encouraged by test results for a potential cholesterol treatment it is collaborating on withIsis Pharmaceuticals. [Boston Globe, Aug 4, 10]

Genzyme up 15% [Jul 23, 10] on news of a possible acquisition by Sanofi-Aventis

Life science firms pitch optimism  [CEO] of Alkermes stood before scores of potential investors yesterday and talked about two drugs - for diabetes and opiate dependency - that his Cambridge company expects to get approved in 2010. “This year is going to be a big year,’’ Pops said. ... Henri Termeer defending his leadership at Genzyme as it scrambles to fix production problems, Biogen Idec’s James C. Mullen avoiding any mention of his recent decision to step down from the company’s top post - the mood was generally upbeat. ...  companies have been raising more money in follow-on offerings than any time in the past decade, about $6 billion in 2009  ...  Another huge market opportunity lies in a drug being developed by Vertex Pharmaceuticals to treat hepatitis C, a largely untreated virus estimated to affect about 3 million Americans and 100 million people globally. “We’re doing a lot to raise awareness of this disease,’’ said new Vertex chief Matthew Emmens.  [Robert Weisman, Boston Globe, Jan 14, 10] from the 28th annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco<

Embattled Genzyme [CEO] told investors today that about 80 percent of patients who use Cerezyme, the company's drug for a rare genetic disorder, have resumed treatments after a supply interruption caused by a virus at its Allston Landing plant last year. [Boston Globe, Jan 12, 10]

Genzyme will move all its filling, packaging, and distribution operations out of its Allston drug manufacturing facility because of the latest problems involving contamination at the plant. [Boston Globe, Jan 5, 09]

Genzyme said it is encouraged by early test results of its drug Mozobil as part of a potential strategy to attack blood cancers.  [Boston Globe, Dec 9, 09]

Drug giant Pfizer, mounting a direct challenge to Cambridge biotech Genzyme [Boston Globe, Dec 2, 09]

Isis Pharma  down 17% [Nov 17, 09] An experimental drug from Isis and Genzyme  cut levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol by 25% in patients with a rare genetic disorder that causes extremely high and dangerous levels of cholesterol, according to data presented today at a medical meeting.  [theStreet,com, Nov 17]

Genzyme said it has been included for the first time on the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index. The index tracks companies that practice corporate sustainability, which is defined as a business approach that "creates long-term shareholder value by embracing opportunities and managing risks deriving from economic, environmental, and social developments," according to the index's website. Genzyme said it is one of only three US biotechnology companies to be selected for the index this year.  [Boston Globe, Oct 3, 09]

Just days before a key meeting to consider Genzyme’s application for a new leukemia drug to treat older patients, the Food and Drug Administration released a briefing document criticizing the Cambridge biotechnology company’s clinical study of the drug, called Clolar. [Boston Globe, Aug 29, 09]

Genzyme spent five hundred million dollars developing the drug Myozyme, which is intended for a condition, Pompe disease, that afflicts fewer than ten thousand people worldwide. That’s the quintessential modern drug: a high-tech, targeted remedy that took a very long and costly path to market. Myozyme is priced at three hundred thousand dollars a year. Genzyme isn’t a mining company: its real assets are intellectual property—information, not stuff. But, in this case, information does not want to be free. It wants to be really, really expensive.   [Malcolm Gladwell, The New Yorker, Jul 6, 09]

Genzyme  said today that it has decided to scrap about 80 percent of material used to make the drug Cerezyme that it had been working on at the time a virus was discovered at its Boston manufacturing plant in June. [Boston Globe, Aug 10, 09]

Genzyme continued its descent... to close at its lowest level in more than five years. Goldman Sachs on Friday added the stock to its "conviction sell" list amid uncertainty surrounding the biotech firm's recent manufacturing problems at a large production facility.  [Wall Street Journal, Aug 8, 09]

Genzyme said that regulators have granted one of its drugs marketing authorization for many European countries.  [Boston Globe, Aug 6, 09]

Genzyme spent five hundred million dollars developing the drug Myozyme, which is intended for a condition, Pompe disease, that afflicts fewer than ten thousand people worldwide. That’s the quintessential modern drug: a high-tech, targeted remedy that took a very long and costly path to market. Myozyme is priced at three hundred thousand dollars a year. Genzyme isn’t a mining company: its real assets are intellectual property—information, not stuff. But, in this case, information does not want to be free. It wants to be really, really expensive. [Malcolm Gladwell reviewing Chris Anderson’s, Free: The Future of a Radical Price, The New Yorker, Jul 6, 09]

The virus hunters have arrived at Genzyme. Dozens of decontamination specialists are busy stripping insulation from pipes at the company’s biotech drug plant overlooking the Charles River in Allston. Their prep work involves dismantling equipment, peeling gaskets from the lids of 2,000-liter vats called bioreactors, and scrubbing down every surface in sight with spore-killing bleach. [Robert Weisman, Boston Globe, Jun 25, 09]

Genzyme is shutting down production at its main U.S. plant for several weeks, marking the latest manufacturing misstep for the company, which faces potential shortages of some of its best-selling drugs.  The company said it acted after discovering a virus in one of six bioreactor vats used to develop drugs at the plant, which is the only facility that makes two of Genzyme's top sellers. .... Over the past year, Genzyme has been hit by other manufacturing-related concerns and the company's stock has declined 28% over the past four months. [David Armstrong, Wall Street Journal, Jun 17, 09]  SBIR firms often way underestimate the intense demands of manufacturing their sweet technology for competitive markets. And the government R&D agencies typically aren't much help on the subject.

Genzyme said that the European Commission has approved Renvela in the treatment of some patients with chronic kidney disease.  [Boston Globe, Jun 12, 09]

Genzyme, best known for targeting rare genetic disorders like Pompe disease and Fabry disease, is increasing its investment in drugs to treat broader diseases such as cancer and multiple sclerosis. ....  agreed to acquire the worldwide rights to a potential multiple sclerosis treatment from Bayer HealthCare.  The treatment is called Campath   [Boston Globe, Apr 1, 09]  will acquire a Snohomish County pharmaceutical factory for $75 million to $100 million as part of a multidrug deal with Bayer, the companies said today. [Seattle Times, Mar 31]

Genzyme  said it received regulatory approval to manufacture one drug on a larger scale in Europe and to market a therapy in the United States.  [Boston Globe, Feb 26, 09]

Genzyme said its experimental oral treatment for Gaucher disease, a rare genetic disorder, met the main goal of a mid-stage clinical trial.  [Boston Globe, Feb 21, 09]

Genzyme CEO Henri Termeer, who marked his 25th anniversary with the Cambridge biotechnology giant this year, says he has no plans to retire. [Boston Globe, Dec 24]

Investing in People. Genzyme spent $770,000 lobbying the federal government in the third quarter, according to a recent disclosure form.  [Boston Globe, Dec 9, 08]

Genzyme  down 10% [Dec 1, 08]  On a stock bloodbath day

Genzyme said it has asked the FDA to approve its leukemia drug Clolar for adults.  The drug is already approved for a form of the disease called acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients between 1 and 21 years old who have had at least two prior treatments.  [Boston Globe, Nov 24, 08]

a first-ever deal to bring treatments to market based on adult stem cells, Genzyme  has entered into a deal with Osiris Therapeutics, which will see Genzyme investing at least $130 million in Osiris — in a deal worth a potential $1.25 billion.  [Mass High Tech, Nov 4, 08]

Genzyme up 13% [Oct 13, 08]

Genzyme  announced the opening of its new LEED-certified science center in Framingham, today. The $125 million, 180,000-square-foot facility can house 350 employees in a building intended for the early-stage research of cancer, heart disease, genetic diseases, and endocrinology and neurological disorders. [Mass High Tech, Sep 22, 08]

Genzyme and Isis said FDA requirements will result in some delays for Mipomersen, the cholesterol-lowering antisense drug at the heart of their joint venture deal announced in January. The news sent Isis shares down 29% [thestreet.com, Apr 25, 08]

Genzyme plans to construct a 200,000-square-foot facility for research and development in Beijing  [Mass High Tech, Apr 22, 08] Maybe it could get an unadulterated source of its supplies from corner-cutting Chinese factories.

In a decision that shows how difficult it is to copy complex, biologic drugs, federal regulators rejected Genzyme 's request for permission to sell in the United States a version of its Pompe disease drug, called Myozyme, that is made at its Allston manufacturing plant, the company disclosed yesterday afternoon. [Boston Globe, Apr 22]

Genzyme announced plans today to expand its manufacturing and research facilities in Ireland.  The Irish government said it was offering confidential assistance to subsidize the $200M expansion  [Boston Globe, Apr 1, 08]

Genzyme launched its kidney disease treatment Renvela. FDA approved the drug in October. It’s a new version of the kidney disease drug Renagel, in use since 1998. [Boston Globe, Mar 7, 08]

Genzyme announced a license agreement for exclusive rights to a lung-cancer diagnostic.  [Boston Globe, Jan 16]

Genzyme said its fourth-quarter revenue rose 21% [Jan 8, 08]

Genzyme and the town of Framingham have asked state officials for a commitment of $12.5 M in state funds toward Genzyme's proposed $260 M expansion of its biologics facility in Framingham  [Mass High Tech, Dec 31,07]

Genzyme reports the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved another use for its thyroid cancer medication. [Dec 07]

Genzyme (Cambridge MA; $1M SBIR long ago) has agreed to pay $57M for privately held Canadian Diagnostic Chemicals Ltd.'s diagnostics unit.  [Boston Globe, Nov 10]

An experimental antidiarrhea drug made by Genzyme (Boston, MA: $1M SBIR a decade ago) failed its first large test in humans, the company said yesterday, the second disappointment for the Cambridge biotechnology giant in two days. [Boston Globe, Jul 7]

Geocent (Metairie, LA)

The Navy has awarded a $22.1 million contract information technology company Geocent (Metairie, LA; $200K SBIR) to support its Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center ....will help develop command-and-control technologies and capabilities for the center's Pacific office, including systems engineering and other software services.  [AP, Jan 1, 2014]  

Geocove (Orlando, FL)

A high-tech mix of five [more] start-up and relocated companies will locate in University at Buffalo [NY] facilities: Cytocybernetics  (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR), a new company pledged to create four new jobs, invest $41,000 and has developed a device that aims to help improve drug safety screening for the pharmaceutical industry; Greenwich Geriatrics (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR) , a new company which pledged to create 20 new jobs, invest $355,000 ...  company’s decision-support software aims to help caregivers and health professionals make recommendations for individuals with complex medical problems;  Geocove (Orlando, FL; no SBIR), expanding to Buffalo, pledged to create five new jobs, invest $60,000 builds custom GIS tools to a multitude of industries, and will partner with UB’s geography department and GIS program.Zintera (San Diego, CA; no SBIR)  expanding in Buffalo, pledged to create five new jobs, invest $91,000 ...  company’s platform uses an approximation of the biological human mind to pursue solutions in healthcare, genomics and life sciences applications;  Natural Energy Systems, (Canadian), pledged to create five new jobs and invest $50,000. .. converts sustainable organic waste to clean-burning renewable fuel using a process patented by the company’s founder.  [Dan Miner, Buffalo Business First, Apr 27, 15]

GeoMed Analytical

By the time the University of Massachusetts at Boston officially opens its Venture Development Center this morning, professor Robyn Hannigan hopes to have her laser system unpacked and her lab's mercury analyzer working.  Hannigan is excited by the prospect of developing her new company, GeoMed Analytical. It will be the first faculty-run firm to be launched in the new $8 million incubator, designed to nurture start-up companies that will turn UMass-Boston research into profitable products.  [Boston Globe, May 1, 09]

Geomagic (RTP, NC)

Ping Fu, the CEO of Geomagic (RTP, NC; one SBIR) recognizes that most entrepreneurs are too busy running their companies to get involved in politics. But when the White House called, she jumped at the chance to provide a voice for small- and medium-size businesses. Fu was one of 50 CEOs who attended a forum Thursday in Washington about using technology to modernize government. ....  she got her main point across: that any stimulus or job-creation money should be aimed largely at smaller companies, which do the bulk of the hiring. ....  she co-founded in 1996 makes 3D software that allows customers such as NASA and Harley Davidson to build realistic digital models of products. ... continues to prosper during the downturn and plans to add to its 100-employee workforce again this year.  [Alan Wolf, Raleigh News & Observer, Jan 15, 10] Does everybody think that what they are doing would be an ideal stimulus target? Where money is on offer,

Geospiza (Seattle, WA)

PerkinElmer has acquired bioinformatics software company Geospiza (Seattle, WA; $3.9M SBIR) for an undisclosed amount, the companies said ... Geospiza's GeneSifter software is used to manage the huge amounts of data flowing out of genetic research.  [Seattle Times, May 6, 11]

Geospiza  (Seatle, WA; $2.8M SBIR) the maker of software for biologists, said that it has been awarded a $1.2 million [NIH SBIR] grant ... along with collaborators at Weill Cornell Medical College and the Mayo Clinic. The grant will support research to help visualize differences in DNA between normal tissue, and samples from tumors, the company said.  [Luke Timmerman, xconomy.com, Feb 9, 11]

Geospiza, a Seattle company that makes software for crunching vast amounts of genetic data, has raised $3 million from private investors to tap the growing market for personalized medicine. [Seattle Times, Dec 1] At least $1.4M of SBIR.

GeoVantage (Peabody, MA)

GeoVantage(Peabody, MA; two SBIRs) which creates aerial imagery for several industries, including Google, has raised $650,000 in equity funding from current investors to help fuel what a company executive calls its "rapid growth" in the past year.  ....  founded in 1998, has a fleet of about 90 airplanes, and rents out others, and uses sensors and navigation systems that can capture imagery that’s accurate to within a meter.  .... In 2005, it was bought by Deere & Co., makers of John Deere brand tractors, as part of five or six companies to make up a new unit for that company. That unit disbanded in 2008, and Herring and two partners - CTO James E. Kain and President William Pevear, both co-founders.   [Don Seiffert, Mass High Tech, Sep 21, 12]

GeoVax Labs (Atlanta, GA)

The Georgia State University Research Foundation has entered into a research collaboration agreement with GeoVax Labs (Smyrna, GA; one SBIR) developing human vaccines, to advance development of a therapeutic vaccine for treatment of chronic Hepatitis B infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates between 700,000 to 1.4 million people in the United States have chronic Hepatitis B virus infections, [GSU press release, Jan 17, 17]

The University of Georgia and GeoVax Labs (Atlanta, GA; one SBIR) will collaborate to develop and test a possible Zika virus vaccine. No proven vaccine or treatment currently exists for Zika.  [Ellie Hensley, Atlanta Business Chronicle, Feb 3, 16]  GeoVax is a biotechnology company established primarily to develop an effective and safe vaccine against HIV-1.   [Wikipedia]

GeoVax Labs (Atlanta, GA; one SBIR) developing an HIV vaccine, has turned its attention to Ebola.  ...  a program to develop vaccines to prevent Ebola infection, and it plans to make them available by 2016. .... is developing two Ebola vaccines -- GOVX-E301 and GOVX-E302. Both are recombinant MVA (modified vaccinia Ankara) vaccines designed to produce non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs) displaying the Ebola virus glycoprotein.   [Atlanta Business Chronicle, Oct 3, 14]

GeoVax Labs (Atlanta, GA; one SBIR) recent $3.6 million Integrated Preclinical/Clinical AIDS Vaccine Development grant has been boosted to $4.4 million. ... first awarded in 2007 [NIH]. With the latest funding, the program has given GeoVax $20.4 million over the past five years. [Atlanta Business Chronicle, Sep 1, 11]

GeoVax Labs (Atlanta, GA; one SBIR)  phase 2a human HIV vaccine trials are set for sites across North and South America, the company said . [Atlanta Business Chronicle, Dec 1, 08] entered into a $10 million common stock purchase agreement with Fusion Capital Fund II [press release May 08] ... raised $7.5M Aug 07 [press release]

Geron (Menlo Park, CA)

Immunomic Therapeutics (Rockville, MD and Lancaster, PA; $1.5M SBIR, 20 employees) has developed a cutting-edge technology for DNA vaccination. The Company is commercializing LAMP-Vax, a breakthrough immunomodulation platform that has the potential to transform the rapidly growing allergy and cancer immunotherapy markets. By 2020, the allergy immunotherapy market is expected to be valued at $50 billion and cancer immunotherapy is expected to be valued at $60 billion.  ITI has already executed three commercial partnerships - two with Astellas Pharma and one with Geron/Asterias.    [company website, Jul 28, 16] reached a $300 million deal licensing its technology to Japanese company Astellas Pharma.  [Baltimore Sun, Oct 9, 2015]

Geron up 14% [Nov 30, 15]

Geron up 12% [Oct 2,15]

Geron up 13% [Sep 3, 15]

Geron up 13% [Aug 17, 15]

Geron up 11% [May 20, 15]

Geron up 12% [Mar 10, 15]

Geron  up 35% [Mar 5, 15]

Geron up 14% [Nov 21, 14] announced a deal to hand worldwide rights for its lead drug imetelstat to Janssen Biotech, a division of Johnson & Johnson. Geron gets $35 million immediately. Future payments could bump the total to $900 million. [Alex Lash, xconomy.com, Nov 20, 14]

Geron up 21% [Jun 12, 14] 

Nearly three years after Geron shuttered its stem cell program, BioTime (Berkeley, CA; $300K SBIR, launched by two former Geron CEOs purchased the shuttered stem cell and regenerative medicine business) receives [$14.3 million] to relaunch a Phase 1 trial for spinal cord injury.    [Jef Akst, The Scientist, May 27, 14]

Geron   down 62% [Mar 12, 14]

Geron up 24% [Jan 30, 14]

Geron down 15% [Jan 27, 14]  

Geron up 19% [Jan 21, 14]

Geron down 14% [Jan 13, 14]

 Geron down 10% [Dec 11, 13]

Geron up 10% [Nov 11,13]

Geron down 12% [Nov 8, 13]

Geron up 45% [Nov 7, 13] leading NASDAQ gainer  after its experimental bone marrow disorder drug helped patients in a study.  [Motley Fool]

Geron up 40% [Oct 16, 13]

Where Geron failed, StemCells (Newark, CA; :$600K SBIR)  hopes to thrive.  ....  [FDA]  signed off on an expansion of a Phase I/II clinical trial to the United States, allowing the company to enroll patients in a trial that injects its purified neural stem cells into patients with spinal cord injuries.  [Ron Leuty, San Francisco Business Times, Oct 2, 13]  Meanwhile, In a complex stock-swapping and intellectual property deal, including a new subsidiary called Asterias Biotherapeutics, Alameda's BioTime (NYSE: BTX) said that it closed a deal to buy Geron (Menlo Park, CA; $900K SBIR)'s  human embryonic stem cell assets and the rights to use certain stem cell lines.  [Ron Leuty, San Francisco Business Times, Oct 1, 13] 

BioTime (Alameda, CA; $300K SBIR) picked up 400 patents and applications plus other intellectual property dealing with human embryonic stem cells from Geron [Stephen EF Brown, San Francisco Business Times, Jan 7, 13]

Geron conducting the world’s first clinical trial of a therapy using human embryonic stem cells said that it was halting that trial and leaving the stem cell business entirely.  [Andrew Pollack, New York Times, Nov 15, 11]

Geronup 10% [Jul 8, 11]

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine made history Wednesday by awarding taxpayer funding for the first time to study an experimental stem cell treatment on humans. The $25 million grant went to Geron of Menlo Park, which last October began injecting immature versions of special neural cells derived from embryonic stem cells into patients paralyzed by spinal cord injuries. [Keith Darce, signonsandiego.com, May 4, 11]

Geronsaid it will offer 17.4 million shares of common stock in a public offering with expected proceeds of about $87 million. [San Francisco Business Times, Dec 7, 10]

Geron  has begun testing an embryonic stem-cell treatment on a patient with spinal cord injuries, marking the first time such a medical therapy has been used on a human in a government approved study.  [AP, Oct 11, 10]

After an 18-month delay, the [FDA] has given clearance to Geronand the University of California, Irvine, to begin a Phase I study of a human embryonic stem cell therapy for patients with spinal cord injuries. [AAAS, Aug 4, 10]

Geron up 17% [Jul 30, 10]

Geron up 12% [Jan 4, 10]

Geron up 13% [Dec 2, 09]  Scientists can start using taxpayer dollars to do research with 13 batches of embryonic stem cells and the government says dozens more cell lines should be available soon, opening a new era for the potentially life-saving field. [AP, Dec 2]

Geron down 10% [Nov 2, 09]

Geron down 10% [Aug 18, 09]  said U.S. regulators placed its application for a cell therapy to treat spinal-cord injuries on hold.  [Wall Street Journal, Aug 19]

Geron up 15% [Jul 27, 09]

Geron up 15% [Jun 30, 09] agreed to provide stem cells to GE Healthcare for use in tools that will test for the toxic effects of medicines. [Wall Street Journal, Jul 1]

Geron   up 18% [May 5, 09]

Geron  up 10% [Apr 16, 09]

Geron  down 10% [Mar 30, 09]

Geron  up 17% [Mar 9, 09]

Geron down 10% [Feb 27, 09]

Geron    down 11% [Feb 18, 09]

Geron down 18% [Feb 13, 09]

Geron  up 15% [Jan 26, 09]

Geron  up 36% [Jan 23, 09]

first embryonic stem cells in humans ... Just two days after the inauguration of President Barack Obama, who opposed his predecessor’s ban on federal funding for embryonic stem-cell research, the [FDA] authorised Geron, a US biotech company, to begin clinical trials for patients with severe spinal cord injuries.  [Financial Times, Jan 23, 09]

Geron up 10% [Jan 21, 09]

Geron up 11% [Dec 8, 08]

Geron  down 14% [Dec 1, 08]  On a stock bloodbath day

Geron up 11% [Nov 10, 08]  StemCells reached its highest value in more than a year in U.S. trading on reports that President-elect Barack Obama may reverse the Bush administration's order restricting federal funding for embryonic stem-cell research. Other companies involved in stem-cell development such as Advanced Cell Technology, Geron and Aastrom Biosciences also gained. [San Jose Mercury News, Nov 10]

Geron  down 17% [Nov 12, 08]

Geron down 13% [Nov 5, 08]

Geron up 14% [Nov 3, 08]

Geron up 16% [Oct 28, 08]

Geron up 15% [Oct 20, 08]

Geron up 11% [Sep 16, 08]

Geron up 11% [Jan 29, 08]

Geron up 10%.  [Aug 8, 07]

The patients tolerated Geron's cancer drug, but sadly, so did the leukemia cells.  Down 10% [Jun 12, 07]

Geron up 15% [May 17, 07] on news that its research partners at the University of Alberta were able to differentiate embryonic stem cells into clusters that secrete insulin in response to elevated glucose levels .. which implies the feasibility of producing therapeutic cells from stem cells to treat diabetes.

Gevo (Douglas County, CO)

Gevo said its recent one-for-20 reverse stock split worked, and it's now back in compliance with Nasdaq stock exchange rules. [Ben Miller, Denver Business Journal, Jan 26, 17]

Gevo (Englewood CO; $1.5M SBIR)up 14% [Feb 2, 17]

Alaska Airlines says it will will partner with Gevo (no SBIR), a leading maker of plant-based jet fuel, as the airline progresses from previous demonstration flights using Gevo's aviation biofuel to commercial flight sometime this year. [Steve Wilhelm, Puget Sound Business Journal, Jan 6, 16]

After nearly five years of start-up struggles, Gevo said that it will continuously produce a new, corn-based biofuel at its Luverne, Minn., plant in 2016 — and make some money at it.  The company, which in 2011 converted the Minnesota ethanol plant to produce an alcohol cousin called isobutanol, said it will increase production of the new biofuel next year to 750,000 gallons to 1 million gallons — a seven- to tenfold increase. [David Shaffer, Minneapolis Star Tribune , Sep 23, 15]

Gevo (Englewood, CO; no SBIR), a small, struggling company that owns the Minnesota plant, and competitor Butamax Advanced Biofuels (Wilmington, DE, venture of BP and Dupont) announced they settled multiple lawsuits over patents to produce isobutanol, which is used as engine fuel and in making green chemicals and plastic.  Under the agreement, Gevo, based in olo., and Butamax, a , have cross-licensed their technologies. ... Gevo acquired the Luverne ethanol plant in 2010, installed its technology and expected to be producing 500 million gallons of isobutanol annually at multiple sites by now. But making commercial quantities proved to be a challenge. Two years ago, Gevo resumed making ethanol in the Luverne plant but continued to work on isobutanol production.  In the meantime, Gevo has accumulated a deficit of $325 million, including $22 million in net losses in the first half of this year.    [David Shaffer, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug 24, 15]

Gevo biofuels producer, says that for the first time, a U.S. gas station is selling gasoline blended with Gevo's isobutanol at the pump. .... produces isobutanol, ethanol and animal feed at a fermentation plant in Luverne, Minnesota, and operates a biorefinery in Silsbee, Texas, with South Hampton Resources Inc. to produce renewable jet fuel, octane, and ingredients for plastics. [Mark Harden, Denver Business Journal, Jul 30, 15]

Gevo up 20% [Jul 30,15]

Gevo  down 11% [Jul 14,15]

Gevo up 11% [Jul 10,15]

Gevo down 21% [Jul 8, 15]

Gevo down 12% [Jun 29, 15]

Gevo up 10% [Jun 10, 15]

Gevo up 10% [Jun 4, 15]

Gevo down 13% [Jun 3, 15]

Gevo up 26% [Jun 2, 15] top percentage gainer; entered into an agreement with FCStone Merchant Services, LLC to originate and supply corn for Gevo's plant in Luverne, Minn.  Engaging FCStone to conduct Gevo's corn purchasing at Luverne is expected to free up more than $1 million of working capital, which has previously been tied up in corn inventory [company press release, Jun 3, 15]

Gevo down 15% [May 29, 15]

Gevo up 17% [May 28, 15]

Gevo down 10% [May 19, 15]

Gevo down 13% [May 14, 15]

Gevo down 14% [May 11, 15]

Gevo (Englewood, CO; $1.5M SBIR) up 123% [May 7, 15]  announced it has signed a strategic alliance agreement with Alaska Airlines to purchase Gevo's renewable jet fuel and fly the first-ever commercial flight on alcohol-to-jet fuel (ATJ).

biofuels company Gevo (Denver, CO; $1.5M SBIR) said it will initiate a 1-for-15 reverse stock split  [Cathy Proctor,     Denver Business Journal, Apr 20, 15]

The Supreme Court ordered that a long-running legal battle between Gevo (Englewood, CO; $1.6M SBIR) and rival biofuels company Butamax Advanced Biofuels LLC be remanded back to the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals for further review.   [Cathy Proctor,  Denver Business Journal, Jan 27, 15]

Gevo (Englewood, CO; $1.6M SBIR) said it cut 41 percent of its headquarters workers to save money.  ...  The company has seen its stock drop from $25 per share in 2011 to less than $1 today ...  technology to turn corn into a higher-value alcohol has faced a rocky, longer-than-expected road from laboratory to marketplace.  [DAVID SHAFFER , Minneapolis Star Tribune, Jan 20, 15]

Gevo (Douglas County, CO; $1.5M SBIR) which specializes in turning corn into fuel and feedstocks for the chemical industry, said today that it's been issued a new patent. The company has more than 450 patents and patent applications, but Douglas County-based Gevo (Nasdaq: GEVO) trumpeted the latest patent, U.S.. patent no. 8,431,374, as it covers "the foundational methods for low-cost isobutanol production at commercially relevant titer, productivity and yields."  [Cathy Proctor, Denver Business Journal, Apr 30, 13] 

GI Dynamics (Lexington, MA)

GI Dynamics (Lexington, MA; no SBIR) reports it has taken in a strategic investment from Minnesota-based medical device giant Medtronic Inc. that will be used to move GI Dynamics’ EndoBarrier Gastrointestinal Liner for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes and obesity toward market approval. ... has secured more than $75 million in venture capital financing since it was founded in 2003  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Jan 7, 10]

GigOptix

GigPeak (formerly iTerra Communicationsand GigOptixmarket cap $134M,San Jose, CA; $750K SBIR), which provides semiconductor and optical components, acquired chip and software provider Magnum Semiconductor [for $55M].  [Gina Hall, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Apr 5, 16]  launched from Microvision in Y2K as Lumera (Bothell WA; $600K SBIR)   ..  acquired Helix (Switzerland)  in 2008

GigOptix, (Palo Alto, CA; $700K SBIR) a supplier of semiconductor and optical components that enable high speed information streaming, has is buying Endwave (no SBIR) for about $24 million of stock. [Patrick Hoge, San Francisco Business Times, Jun 17, 11]

Lumera which is merging with GigOptix  of California, reported that it trimmed its third-quarter loss to $1.5 million, [Puget Sound Business Journal, Oct 21, 08]

Gilead Sciences (Foster City, CA)

Gilead Sciences and Nimbus Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR, 20 employees) announced that the companies have signed a definitive agreement under which Gilead will acquire Nimbus Apollo, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Nimbus Therapeutics, and its Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC) inhibitor program. Nimbus Therapeutics will receive an upfront payment of $400 million, with the potential to receive an additional $800 million in development-related milestones over time. [joint companies press release, Apr 4, 16]

Gilead Sciences (Foster City, CA; $1.3M SBIR two decades ago, market cap  $160B) received U.S. approval for a new drug that promises to cure most hepatitis C patients without requiring other medicines. The drug carries a price tag of nearly $100,000.   ...  The drug, dubbed Harvoni, builds on Gilead’s blockbuster Sovaldi treatment ($84,000), which recorded the biggest drug launch in history after going on sale late last year and is itself a lightning rod for critics of drug prices. [Wall Street Journal, Oct 10, 14]  Federal health officials have approved a daily pill that can cure the most common form of hepatitis C without the grueling pill-and-injection cocktail long used to treat the virus.  But the drug's $1,125-per-pill price is sure to increase criticism of drugmaker Gilead Sciences, whose pricing strategy for an older hepatitis drug has already drawn scorn from patient groups, insurers and politicians worldwide.  [MATTHEW PERRONE, AP, Oct 10, 14]

Giner  (Newton, MA)

Giner Electrochemical Systems (about $70M SBIR over 27 years)  received $1.5 million to scale up its process for producing a more stable membrane for use in fuel cells. ... part of a nationwide award of $57 million aimed at accelerating the commercialization of clean technologies, and comes from the the DOE’s Small Business Phase 3 “Xlerator” program  [Kyle Alspach, Mass High Tech, Sep 16, 10]

Giner (Newton, MA; 164 SBIR projects) research and development company, has won a $2.3 million SBIR from NIH ... development of a measurement tool to assess human exposure to certain heavy metals such as arsenic, cadmium and lead. The sensor, referred to as a Field-Deployable Monitor to Assess Personal Exposure to Multiple Heavy Metals, is intended as an inexpensive, energy-saving, portable alternative to current heavy-metal analyses conducted in laboratories. [Mass High Tech, Oct 13, 09] Giner's exact total SBIR isn't available since SBA's database has been partly broken for weeks. But 164 Phase 1s and 80 Phase 2s might total something like $70M since 1983. Although both the NIH and the company would no doubt claim high innovation, this latest project sounds an awful lot like a low technical risk engineering service job for data collection by a perfectly competent company. No doubt also that the Massachusetts Congressional delegation finds great merit in an SBIR program that continues to pour zillions into their state. Before the re-authorization struggle ends, Congress will have to decide whether agencies need to be forced into such social programs just to do ordinary R&D that might well have been done even if SBIR never existed.

Giner Electrochemical Systems ( Newton MA) will be bought by Ener1 (Fort Lauderdale FL). Thius Giner is  joint venture of Giner (the SBIR company) and General Motors. Giner, both forms, researches proton exchange membrane (PEM) high-pressure electrolyzers for gas production, regenerative fuel cells, and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stacks and systems. (Jan 05)

Giner formed a joint enterprise, Giner Electrochemical Systems LLC, with General Motors for development of fuel-cell vehicles. Giner has what the SBIR advocates call a strong strong SBIR presence, having been active in the SBIR program from the very earliest days (1983-present). Oh, yeah. Giner is proof that if the government pours enough kerosene, a blaze may start. Giner has had about $26M of SBIR in the last decade with a typical staffing of 25 people. That's about $1M per person (or $100K per year) which is enough to explain what Giner has been doing - contract government research . Whether SBIR should be such a long term research program is a political question of course. Any economic return has yet to show up; this GM deal shows technical confidence but GM has not sold any economic quantity of vehicles and even GM's research is partly supported by the government.

Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA)

NIST TIP winners  $22 million in funding for nine research projects targeting innovative manufacturing technologies in fields ranging from biopharmaceuticals and electronics to renewable energy sources and energy storage:  Isogenis (Aurora, CO; $4.8M SBIR);  ActaCell,  (Austin, TX; no SBIR);  Engineered BioPharmaceuticals (Manchester, CT; no SBIR); Arsenal Medical  (Watertown, MA; no SBIR); Kent Displays (Kent, OH; $2.6M SBIR); Precision BioSciences (Research Triangle Park, NC; $340K SBIR); Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR); Sinmat (Gainesville, FL; $4.4M SBIR); Polyera (Skokie, IL; no SBIR). 

ARPA-E Awards. The administration announced $106M in ARPA-E stimulus awards. Small biz winners:  Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR) $6M primary;  OPX Biotech (no SBIR) $6M primary; Logos Tech (Arlington, VA; $2M SBIR) secondary; Sion Power (Tucson, AZ; $250K SBIR) $5M primary; ReVolt Tech (no SBIR) $5M primary; PolyPlus Battery (Berkeley, CA; one SBIR) $5M; Pellion Tech (no SBIR) $3.2M primary; A123 Systems  secondary, twice;  Planar Energy Devices (no SBIR) $4M; Maxpower (Harleysville, PA; $9M SBIR) secondary; NanoLab (Newton, MA; $5M SBIR) secondary;Codexis (no SBIR) $4.6M; Nexant (no SBIR) secondary.

Seven Massachusetts projects will get $22M in [USDOE] research funding ...  to receive $6 million is Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR), which seeks to engineer the E. coli bacterium to harness electric current to convert carbon dioxide and water into isooctane, a component of gasoline  [Boston Globe, Apr 30, 10]  The rest of the money goes to research universities.

Glauconix (Albany, NY)

 Two nanotechnology companies affiliated with the SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Albany have joined the state's Start-Up New York program [which] allows businesses to operate tax free for a decade.  .... Glauconix (Albany, NY; no SBIR), co-founded by Ph.D student Karen Torrejon, develops a more effective drug screening to prevent glaucoma. It won $100,000 in the state's business competition in 2014. That company will create 14 new jobs and invest $1,272,500. ...  Nano DX is a new biotechnology company that is a spinoff of Nuclea Biotechnologies (Pittsfield, MA; no SBIR). That company develops, produces and markets nanoscale diagnostics to provide patients and physicians with better ways to manage and care for chronic disease like cancer. NANO DX will create 15 new jobs and invest $265,000.  [Chelsea Diana, Albany Business Review, Jul 23, 15]

Glauconix  (Albany, NY;  no SBIR) healthcare startup out of SUNY Polytechnic Institute has landed a $250,000 investment from the Eastern New York Angels (ENYA). ...   co-founded by Ph.D student Karen Torrejon, develops a more effective drug screening to prevent glaucoma. ....  ENYA invests and mentors early-stage technology companies within 75 miles of the Albany area. The group, managed by Richardson and Dick Frederick, invests anywhere from $50,000 to $250,000 per company. For its first fund, the network raised $1.4 million and invested in seven companies.  Richardson said Glauconix first went on their radar last year when the startup won $100,000 in the New York State Business Plan Competition.  [Chelsea Diana, Albany Business Review, Mar 23, 15]

Glaukos (Laguna Hills, CA)

Glaukos down 18% [Sep 14,17]

Glaukos up 25% [May 4,16]

Glaukos down 15% [Jan 19,16]

Glaukos down 26% [Jan 13, 16] after reporting quarterly results

Glaukos up 10%  [Nov 13, 15]

Glaukos up 17% [Nov 11, 15]

Glaukos down 11% [Sep 21,15]

Glaukos down 12% [Aug24, 15]

Glaukos  (Laguna Hills, CA; $200K SBIR) up 12% [Jul 17,15]

Glaukos down 10% [Jun 26, 15]

Glaukos ($200K SBIR) up 73% [Jun 25, 15] after IPO

MicroOptx  (Maple Grove, MN; no SBIR) startup developing a tiny implantable device to treat glaucoma has closed on $2.4 million [to]wrap up a licensing deal for the intellectual property behind its technology, which aims to relieve pressure in the eyes of glaucoma patients. ...  Glaukos [Laguna Hills, CA; $200K SBIR) as MicroOptx's most direct competitor  which makes the tiniest device ever approved by t[FDA]— recently filed for a $75 million initial public offering.   [Katharine Grayson, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Jun 18, 15]

The Wall Street Journal's third annual ranking of the top 50 venture-capital-backed companies shows a crop of contenders that overall are focused less on online consumers than in years past. ....  Unlike in years past, none of the companies on this year's list are in the energy sector, underscoring the challenges faced by that industry. This year was also the first time that a health-care company didn't top the ranking.  [Zoran Basich and Emily Maltby, Wall Street Journal, Sep 27]  Companies with tech that might fit SBIR: 7. Glaukos (Laguna Hills, CA; $200K SBIRs)  $126M; 8. NeuroPace (Mountain View, CA; no SBIR) $180M;  35. Achaogen  (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) $103M; 48. Acceleron Pharma (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) $307M.  The other 46 took VC to reduce business risk, a job not appropriate for government technology subsidy.

GlideLine Systems

Nanohmics (Austin, TX; $16M SBIR)  was among 44 companies nationwide recognized for success in commercializing science and technology innovations with the help of [SBIR] Nanohmics President and co-founder Mike Mayo was at the White House last week to receive the Tibbetts Award, which recognizes companies that have achieve excellence using SBIR. ... founded in 2002, created two new companies to commercialize unique technologies. ... The SBIR program "allowed three first-time entrepreneurs to take the risk of creating a new venture," Mayo said. So far, he said, that has led to the creation of 30 jobs in the Austin area.  Faradox Energy Storage develops high-performance capacitors that can operate in high temperatures. GlideLine Systems develops parachute navigation systems for military special forces personnel.  [Austin American Statesman, Feb 22, 11] Believe what you will about what the Tibbetts Award actually recognizes.  Roland Tibbetts had an interesting idea of an SBIR for NSF which had never funded much small for profit business. But by the time the politicians and the federal agencies captured SBIR for their purposes, the idea had been mangled by self-serving federal management. Nearly thirty years later, it still cannot show any net economic gain over what would have happened if the federal agencies just spent their R&D unmolested by such social programs. Nevertheless, the SBIR advocates hold the principle that anecdote is the singular of data, and if you accept the anecdotes, the whole data must be a mere multiple of them. 

Gliknik (Baltimore, MD)

Gliknik (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR) has raised $1.1 million of a $3.61 million Series A funding round that it will use to pay for research and developing new drugs to treat autoimmune diseases and cancer. [Baltimore Business Journal, Sep 2, 09]

Global Blood Therapeutics

 Reuters reported that Novo Nordisk has expressed interest in acquiring  Global Blood Therapeutics (South San Francisco, CA;  no SBIR) .  [Mar 10, 17]

Global Blood Thera up 21% [Mar 8, 17]

Global Blood Thera down 14% [Feb 22,17]

Global Blood Thera up 11% [Feb 9, 17]

Cesca Thera  up 11% [Jan 4, 17]

Global Blood Thera  up 11% [Jan 4, 17]

Catabasis Pharma  up 10% [Jan 4, 17]

Global Blood Thera up 10% [Nov 4, 16]

Global Blood Thera down 14% [Nov 3, 16]

Global Blood Thera up 11% [Oct 25, 16]

Global Blood Thera down 13% [Oct 5, 16]

Global Blood Thera up 13% [Sep 30, 16]

Global Blood Thera  up 11%  [Sep 14, 16]

Global Blood Thera up 18% [Aug 12, 16]

Global Blood Thera  up 12% [Jun 2, 16]

Global Blood Thera up 12% [Apr 4, 16]

Global Blood Thera down 13% [Feb 9, 16]

Global Blood Thera down 19% [Feb 8, 16]

Global Blood Thera  down 10% [Dec 17, 15]

Global Blood Thera down 26% [Dec 7, 15]  Announces Positive Phase 1/2 Data Supporting Development of GBT440 as a Potentially Disease-Modifying Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease  [Wall Street Journal, Dec 7, 15]

Global Blood Thera up 17%  [Nov 18, 15]

Global Blood down 10% [Sep 21, 15]

Global Blood Thera down 13% [Aug 24, 15]

Global Blood Therapeutics down 16% [Aug 18, 15]

Global Blood Therapeutics up 17% [Aug 17, 15]

Global Blood Therapeutics up 17% [Aug 14, 15]

Global Blood Therapeutics up 115% [Aug 12, 15] working on a treatment for sickle cell disease, after the company's $120 million IPO  [Cromwell Schubarth, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Aug 11, 15]

Early-stage biotech startup Global Blood Therapeutics (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) set a target range for its IPO [to raise up to $124M] to develop a small-molecule therapy for sickle cell disease. [Gina Hall, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Jul 31, 15]

Global Blood Therapeutics (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) announced a $48 million Series B round. ...   is bringing aboard investors who are often associated with a push toward going public. ...   is going after sickle-cell disease, a genetic blood disorder with specific geographic origin. In the U.S., one in 500 African Americans are born with the disease because of their African descent, according to the National Institutes of Health. The company is starting a Phase 1/2 trial and could have meaningful data in the second half of 2015, according to CEO Ted Love. [Alex Lash, xconomy.com, Jan 8, 15]

Third Rock Ventures is backing an all-star lineup of cardiovascular researchers with a $38 million Series A round to discover and develop drugs aimed at key genetic heart mutations. MyoKardia (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR)., which will operate lab space next to fellow Third Rock startup Global Blood Therapeutics(no SBIR), is aimed at a putting together a pipeline of small-molecule drugs that initially will treat hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Those conditions can lead to heart failure.  [San Francisco Business Times, Sep 20, 12]

Global Cancer Diagnostics (Tempe, AZ)

QuantRx Biomedical (Tualatin, OR; no SBIR) announced its intentions to buy Global Cancer Diagnostics (Tempe, AZ; no SBIR) which produces a blood test for lung cancer.  ...  actually a reverse merger, which will allow Global Cancer Diagnostics to be publicly traded ...   [CEO] Gartner's lung cancer test is based on similar technology he used to launch his breast cancer blood test several years ago.   [Angela Gonzales, Phoenix Business Journal, Oct 5, 15]

Global Positions (Billings, MT)

The Independent, Leave-Us-Alone West
Jere Folgert's business, Global Positions, LLC, won an NSFSBIR Phase 1, a first for Billings, MT. Jere wanted to build a full-service company providing geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS) services. He has a software tool to facilitate the visualization of air pollution, though GIS, modeling and data automation which he wanted to make internet-based, and make it available to schools and universities studying the dynamic nature of airborne pollution. Phase 1 will determine the feasibility of an Internet-based pollution simulator, by creating a proof-of-principal prototype comprised of a well-known air pollution dispersion model and GIS. The resulting internet based IGPPS system will include a carefully designed Internet-based interface, a powerful air pollution model and GIS. This workbench of tools will be an effective teaching tool allowing "what-if" scenarios to be easily modeled and visualized. ... Says Jere also The award of the SBIR Phase I was important to our business. It gave us the leverage and funds to pursue a task that had been put on the "back-burner. "Its great to be paid to do what we enjoy doing!!! Our dream is to get heavily involved in GIS/modeling applications along with educational/teaching applications that use the Internet as the interface Jere Folgert, 406-652-6820 Email:jfolgert@GlobalPositions.com, Web:http://www.GlobalPositions.com Another inspirational story from the Mountain West [courtesy of Chris Busch's newsletter] - land of independent Republicans and dry-land ranchers. Ask them about the federal government and see them spit disdain. Ask them about subsidies for ranchers and miners and watch them change the subject. Ask them whether this SBIR is the kind of federal subsidy they want their federal money spent on, and see whether they can think like a free-marketer. Better still, ask them without telling them it is a local company. Ask them why the government has to support a private business developing a product to sell on the open market for which there is little technical risk although a lot of business risk. Ask them why any Internet-related business needs federal support in 1999 America. Ask them what they think a reasonable federal role is in high-tech small business and ask them how much more tax they would be willing to pay for it. Ask them why the government should favor high-tech companies in thinly populated states just because they are in such a place.
Note that if you don't like this situation because you think the federal government ought to do more than shovel money for political reasons, don't blame Wyoming nor the small business. They didn't "invest" the federal money; the federal government did. One might argue, though, that once federal money is on the table, everyone grabs for a share with little regard to national benefit or federalism questions.

Globe Dynamics Engineering International (Santa Ana, CA)

The owner of a California-based aerospace company pleaded guilty in federal court to charges he used inside information from an employee of The Boeing Co. to win contracts to build military aircraft parts, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports. 
William Boozer, owner of Globe Dynamics Engineering International (Santa Ana, CA; no SBIR), paid Deon Anderson, a Boeing procurement officer, for information on historic prices and competitors’ bids. Boozer pleaded guilty to one count of felony wire fraud and is scheduled to be sentenced in August.  [Washington Business Journal, May 13]

GlobeImmune (Louisville, CO)

Globe Immune (Louisville, CO; no SBIR) provided an update on the Company’s business: Gilead Sciences  terminated the collaboration and license agreement with the Company and its rights to GS-4774 have been returned to GlobeImmune;     Timothy C. Rodell has resigned as CEO;  [four directors] have resigned; has terminated the lease for 40,000 gross square feet of office, laboratory and manufacturing space which formerly served as the Company’s corporate headquarters.  [company press release, Nov 17, 16]

Shares of struggling biotech GlobeImmune (Louisville, CO;$100K SBIR) won't be traded on the Nasdaq stock exchange in the future.   ... which was developing cancer drugs, yesterday said its board voted to leave the Nasdaq exchange   [Ben Miller, Denver Business Journal, Jul 8, 16]

GlobeImmune up 61% [Jun 17, 16]

GlobeImmunedown 31% [Jun 20, 16]

GlobeImmune down 24% [Feb 4, 16]

GlobeImmune down 12% [Dec 30, 15]

GlobeImmune up 14% [Dec 22, 15]

GlobeImmune up 14% [Dec 21, 15]

GlobeImmune up 15% [Dec 10, 15]

GlobeImmune up 35% [Dec 1, 15]

GlobeImmune up 41% [Nov 20, 15]

GlobeImmune up 15% [Nov 19, 15]

GlobeImmune up 22% [Aug 31, 15]

slimmed-down GlobeImmune (Louisville, CO; one SBIR, now six employees) may be up for sale. ... working on cancer treatments said it's engaged Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. "to explore alternative ways to maximize stockholder value," which includes a possible sale of the company. .... company said it's acquired more than $225 million in debt, but said it has enough cash to last through the end of next year.  [Ben Miller, Denver Busines Jourrnal, Aug 14, 15]

GlobeImmune down 10% [Aug 18, 15]

Globeimmune up 19% [Aug 5,15]

Following a recent disappointing test of its hepatitis B drug, GlobeImmune  said it's "eliminating the majority of positions in its workforce."  FinanceYahoo estimates GlobeImmune has 22 employees.   [Ben Miller, Denver Business Journal, Jun 10, 15]

GlobeImmune  down 24% [Jun 10, 15]

Globe Immune down 51% [May 27, 15] announced top line results from the GS-4774 Phase 2 study in patients with chronic hepatitis B on long term viral suppression with an oral antiviral treatment. In this study, patients treated with the highest dose of GS-4774 plus ongoing oral antiviral therapy (OAV) did not show a reduction in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) at week 24, the primary endpoint of the study [company press release]

GlobeImmune up 12% [May 26,15]

GlobeImmune down 10% [Mar 25,15]

GlobeImmune up 12% [Mar 23,15]

GlobeImmune (one SBIR) up 13% [Mar 18, 15]

GlobeImmune  up 22% [Dec 9, 14]

Globe Immune up 30% [Nov 3, 14]

Globe Immune up 11% [Oct 31, 14]

GlobeImmune up 11% [Oct 23, 14]

GlobeImmune down 14% [Oct 22, 14]

Globe Immune down 13% [Oct 20, 14]

GlobeImmune down 12% [Oct 14, 14]

GlobeImmune down 10% [Oct 3, 14]

GlobeImmune up 36% [Oct 2, 14]

GlobeImmune up 14% [Oct 1, 14]

GlobeImmune (Denver, CO; one SBIR) down 11% [Sep 29, 14] 

GlobeImmune (Louisville, CO; one SBIR) finally pulled off selling public stock, raising $15 million for the biotech in a trimmed-down IPO.  ...   developing experimental treatments for infectious diseases and cancer  [Greg Avery, Denver Business Journal, Jul 2, 14]

GlobeImmune (Louisville, CO; $1.8M SBIR, started in 1995 as Ceres Pharmaceuticals) biotech company that called off its IPO last year, filed a registration statement for an initial public offering .... developing experimental biotech medicines treating cancers and hepatitis.  [L. Wayne Hicks, Denver Business Journal, Mar 17, 14]

Gloucester Pharmaceuticals (Cambridge, MA)

Gloucester Pharmaceuticals (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR)  has just raised $1.7 million in a financing round, according to official documents.  ... acquires clinical-stage oncology drug candidates with an eye to getting them through regulatory approval and commercialization. ...  has raised substantial investment dollars in the past. Back in 2004, Gloucester Pharmaceuticals raised $29 million in a Series B financing round .  [Mass High Tech, May 8, 09]

Glowforge (Seattle,WA)

Glowforge (Seattle, WA; no SBIR, 14 employees) startup that makes a 3-D laser printer has closed out a 30-day crowdfunding campaign with an eye-popping result — it raised $27.4 million when the drive ended, far beyond its $100,000 goal. [Rachel Lerman, Seattle Times, Oct 23, 15]

Glowforge  (Seattle, WA; no SBIR)  startup announced a $9 million series A financing round  from big name venture firms ... created a [3D] printer that is simpler to use  ... The technology works by letting people upload sketches to the cloud and minutes later, the machine can create a 3D version of that sketch by carving it into a block of wood, leather or other materials. [Founder Dan] Shapiro has an impressive history in the business world — he was CEO of Google Comparison, and founded Ontela (Seattle, WA; no SBIR) and Sparkbuy (Seattle, WA; no SBIR).  [Rachel Lerman, Puget Sound Business Journal, May 20, 15]

GlucaGo (West Lafayette,IN)

GlucaGo, (West Lafayette,  IN; no SBIR) founded through Purdue University’s Biomedship Program, is among 16 finalists in a Global Business Plan Competition sponsored by Cisco and venture capital firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson.... makes a Chapstick-sized drug injector that is easy to use and allows unstable drugs or vaccines to maintain their stability at room temperature.  [Erika Smith, Indianapolis Star, Jun 23, 10]

GlycoFi

Adimab(Lebanon, NH; no SBIR) has raised $4 million, reports in a regulatory filing. ... [founder] Gerngross, an engineering professor at Dartmouth College, previously founded the biotech company GlycoFi ($2.2m SBIR)., which he sold to Merck & Co. Inc. for over $400 million.  [Mass High Tech, Dec 1, 10]

GlycoMimetics (Gaithersburg, MD)

GlycoMimetics up 13% [Jun 23, 16]

GlycoMimetics down 17% [Jun 17, 16] after IPO that riased $19M

GlycoMimetics up 25% [Feb 16, 16]

GlycoMimetics (Gaithersburg, MD; no SBIR) collected a $15 million payment from the pharma giant [Pfizer] stemming from its license agreement for the sickle cell anemia drug rivipansel.  ... in January closed an initial public offering in which it raised $64.4 million  [Bill Flook, Washington Business Journal, May  20]

GlycoMimetics (Gaithersburg, MD; no SBIR)  has filed to raise as much as $86 million in an [IPO]  ..... lead drug candidate, GMI-1070, is in the midst of mid-stage trials as a treatment for vaso-occlusive crisis, a complication of sickle cell disease. [Bill Flook, Baltimore Business Journal, Oct 7, 13]

GlyGenix (Woodbridge, CT)

Apparently spun out of a biotechnology company, startup UCAN (formerly GlyGenix Woodbridge, CT; no SBIR) landed $624,000 of a planned $2.5 million funding round ... focused on marketing a nutritional sports product it calls SuperStarch ... GlyGenix, however is focused on treating and curing Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1a ... GlyGenix took a $1.645 million Series A round of funding in January  [Mass High Tech, Dec 28, 09]

Glyscend (Baltimore, MD)

Glyscend (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR, founded 2014 spun out of Johns Hopkins) was awarded one of three $500,000 research grants from Johnson & Johnson Innovation LLC and its research arm Janssen as part of the health care giant's World Without Disease QuickFire Challenge. ...    is developing transformative therapies for metabolic diseases (such as type 2 diabetes and obesity) by reducing the concept of bariatric (gastric bypass) surgery into a pill. [JNJ press release, Nov 14, 16]

GlySens (San Diego, CA)

San Diego County companies that raised the largest amount of venture capital in the fourth quarter of 2015
Sapphire Energy ($200K SBIR) $91 million;  Effector Therapeutics: $40 million;  MD Revolution: $22.45 million;  AltheaDX: $20.1 million;  Elcelyx Therapeutics: $20 million;  Amplyx Pharmaceuticals: $20 million;  Astute Medical: $20 million;   Glysens  ($6.8M SBIR): $20 million;  Crinetics Pharmaceuticals  ($200K SBIR): $18 million;   Enlibrium: $15 million   Source: MoneyTree Survey by PricewaterhouseCoopers and the NVCA with data from Thomson Reuters  [xconomy.com]

GlySens (San Diego, CA; $6.8M SBIR) is seeking [FDA] permissiono launch a pilot study testing its implanted wireless sensor in about a dozen people with diabetes. ... a device that constantly monitors blood-sugar levels without painful finger pricks or frequent maintenance  [Keith Darce, SD Union Tribune, Jul 28, 10]

GMZ Energy (Newton, MA)

GMZ Energy (Newton, MA; no SBIR) has raised another round worth $4.5 million, based on federal filings. ...  developing thermoelectric materials based on nanotechnology developed at MIT  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Dec 30, 11]

A $7 million tranche of funding for GMZ Energy, (Newton, MA; no SBIR) heat-to-electricity technology firm, appears to be one of the largest energy VC rounds of the quarter.  ...  produces thermoelectric materials based on nanotechnology developed at MIT and Boston College. The company said the new funding would be used to accelerate its engineering and commercialization efforts. [Kyle Alspach, Boston Business Journal, Dec 21, 11]

GnuBio

Harvard University spinout GnuBio (no SBIR). has raised $3 million in an equity offering ...  promises to join together millions of biological samples that are currently siloed at institutes around the world, and to do it using an open source platform. [Mass High Tech, Dec 3, 10]

The race to sequence genomes faster and cheaper has a new entrant — a start-up spun out of a Harvard University laboratory that focuses on emulsions, or mixtures of liquids like those found in mayonnaise and salad dressings. Deciphering the first human genome, a massive technical feat, took more than a decade and cost about $3 billion, but the price and time have been dropping rapidly in the 10 years since — down to about $20,000, powered by new technologies that take days or weeks. The new company, GnuBio, is in the very early stages of its development, but it said last week that its technology could sequence a human genome in hours and for just $30.  [Boston Globe, Jun 7, 10]

Goldfinch Bio (Cambridge, MA)

Goldfinch Bio (Cambridge, MA)  raised $55 million from Third Rock Ventures, where it incubated for more than a year. Goldfinch aims to build a database of genetic information from patients and their tissue samples, says interim CEO Abbie Celniker, who is also a Third Rock partner. The firm is counting on medical centers around the world to send in their data, which Goldfinch will analyze for mutations that line up with patterns of disease that also show up in the database—such as a patient’s level of proteinuria, the presence of protein in the urine. [Frank Vinluan, xconomy.com, Dec 14, 16]

Goddard Labs (Long Island, NY)

After a few years fine-tuning its investment strategy, Accelerate Long Island has seeded its first group of startups. The nonprofit organization and the Long Island Emerging Technologies Fund announced plans to put $500,000 into five Long Island, NY-based biotech and cleantech startups: Goddard Labs, Green Sulfcrete, PolyNova, SynchroPET, and Traverse Biosciences.  [Ben Fidler, xconomy.com, Jun 9, 14] None had SBIR.

Good Start Genetics (Boston, MA)

Good Start Genetics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) a molecular diagnostics company said that it has closed a non-dilutive loan facility for up to $28 million ...   launched in 2010, specializes in carrier screenings for genetic mutations that can cause disease.  [Chirs Reidy, Boston Globe, May 8, 13]

Good Start Genetics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) Secures $14,000,000 Series B Financing ... advanced DNA sequencing technology is designed to deliver a higher detection rate and improved clinical performance compared to currently available screening methods. [xconomy.com, Apr 2, 12]

Good Start Genetics (Boston, MA; no SBIR)  is the first company to repay an accelerator loan from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, the center said today. ... has developed a pre-pregnancy test that utilizes an advanced DNA sequencing technology to screen for many genetic disorders.  In May 2009, Good Start Genetics was awarded a $500,000 loan from the center in the first round of the center's accelerator program, which provides working capital to early-stage life sciences companies. ... Earlier this month, Good Start Genetics announced it had completed an $18 million Series A financing. [Boston Globe, Sep 20, 10]

Good Start Genetics Good Start Genetics; no SBIR)announced the completion of an $18 million Series A financing  [Boston Globe, Sep 10, 10]

Gore Photonics 

More Raincoats, Less Photonics. Gore Photonics, the fiber optics business unit of W. L. Gore dumped its parallel optical business by selling to Optical Communication Products which makes  fiber optic subsystems and modules for metropolitan area, local area and storage area networks. That Gore division started life as Optical Concepts with substantial help from BMDO's SBIR. Gore is the innovative maker of Goretex rainwear. Buying, selling, and trading photonics entities has been going on for a decade during both the boom and bust of the photonics industry.

Gotham Biotech (New Gloucester, ME)

Gotham Biotech (New Gloucester, ME; no SBIR) startup that wants to design a new Lyme disease test are among the recipients [$15K] of more than $1 million in grants from the Maine Technology Institute.  The institute says it has approved 25 awards that will support innovation all around the state.  [AP, Mar 24, 17]  Small state, small biz, minuscule help against a widespread disease.

GPC-Rx (Seattle,WA)

things are looking better: the research-oriented startups seem poised to survive the downturn, and long-awaited clinical results could propel larger companies like Dendreon to stardom. ...  despite the financial crisis, the Accelerator, a local incubator based in Seattle's Eastlake neighborhood, created three firms last year - Recodagen, GPC-Rx and Mirina(none had SBIR) ... "Seattle is really a town of development-stage biotechs," Miller said. ... Light Sciences Oncology (no SBIR), a firm that canceled its initial public offering last February, managed to raise $10 million from venture capitalists in July. Private investors provided Redmond-based Healionics (no SBIR) — which manufactures material for implants — with a $2.6 million boost in December.  In a deal that could yield big results, Bothell-based Acucela  (no SBIR), which is developing therapies to treat blindness, signed a partnership deal in September with Japanese firm Otsuka Pharmaceutical that could potentially bring it $258 million.   [Angel Gonzalez, Seattle Times, Jan 25]

Radiant Research (Concord, MA)

gRadiant Research (Concord, MA; no SBIR) is trying to make tonsil treatments easier for the patient to swallow, with a new handheld device.  ... received $250,000 in angel funding to pay for preclinical feasibility research, slated for completion by year’s end. Currently, McMillan needs about $3.2 million to develop the first clinical prototype and to do the necessary clinical studies in children and adults. She anticipates being on the market by 2012; the device could potentially garner some $75 million annually in the United States alone.  [Marc Songini, Mass High Tech, May 8, 09]

Gradiant (Woburn, MA)

in Midland, Texas, an inexpensive new process is cleaning up some of the most contaminated water around—the extremely salty stuff that comes up with oil at wells. By the end of next month the technology is expected to be chugging 500,000 gallons per day ... uses technology from Gradiant  (Woburn, MA; no SBIR, website in title only), an MIT spinout ... The process—which the company calls carrier gas extraction—recycles up to 85 percent of the heat needed to keep the system running. The remaining waste is then disposed as sludge in landfills. The project is being done with Pioneer Natural Resources, an oil company in Texas.   [David Talbot, technologyreview.com, Jul 7, 14]    co-founder Anurag Bajpayee's  doctoral work on Directional Solvent Extraction desalination was recognized by Scientific American as a Top 10 World Changing Idea of 2012 [http://ceraweek.com]

GraftWorx (Bel Air, MD)

medical device company GraftWorx (Bel Air, MD; no SBIR, foundd 2012) raised $1.9 million to back pre-clinical trials of its smart stents that can detect impending artery blockages to avoid costly and risky complications.  ...  stents are designed with a built-in sensor that can more accurately measure blood flow and alert doctors if the flow is becoming restricted. Company leaders think the technology could prevent 40,000 amputations a year. [Sarah Gantz, Baltimore Business Journal, Aug 18, 15]

Grail (Menlo Park, CA)

Just months after Grail raised a $900 million Series B round, the startup that aims to detect cancer early on is looking for additional funding, CNBC reports. [techcrunch.com, Oct 31, 17]

Grail  (Menlo Park, CA; no SBIR) the Illumina spinout aiming to develop a blood test that can detect cancer at its earliest stages, has gone global. The , startup, is merging with China’s Cirina (Hong Kong, founded 2014) co-founded by a pioneer in the field of blood-based diagnostics, Dennis Lo [the first to discover that bits of fetal DNA circulate in a pregnant mother’s blood].  ...  [Grail] recently raised a record $900 million round from a group of drugmakers and others, didn’t disclose the financial terms of the merger.  [Ben Fidler, xconomy.com, May 3, 17]

Guardant Health  (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) that sells blood tests to track and, potentially, detect cancer, is announcing this morning that it has raised $360 million from investors, with the goal of deploying its test in 1 million people over the next five years.  That brings the total Guardant has raised to $550 million. ...  Guardant has a new competition: A Silicon Valley company called Grail, spun out of DNA sequencing giant Illumina. Earlier this year, Grail announced that it had raised $900 million from the likes of Bristol-Myers Squibb and Johnson & Johnson.  [Matthew Herper, Forbes, May 11, 17]

Grail (Menlo Park, CA; no SBIR) will raise more than $1 billion — a record fund-raising round in the life sciences — after a second closing of its Series A round, while Freenome (South San Francisco CA; no SBIR) received $65 million as the companies try to develop simple blood draws to detect cancers early. [ Ron Leuty, San Francisco Business Times, Mar 1, 17]

Grail (San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) one-year-old startup, spun out from Illumina, is raising a more than $1 billion Series B as it prepares to begin large-scale clinical testing of a blood test designed to detect cancer in its earliest stages.  [Luke Stangel, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Jan 9, 17]

Cancer diagnostic maker Grail, spinout of Illumina, named top Google executive Jeff Huber as its first CEO. Grail launched a month ago with ambitions to develop a blood test that detects early stage cancer in seemingly healthy people. [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Feb 12,16]

Graphene Energy (Austin,TX)

Graphene Energy (Austin, TX; founded 2008) has raised a $500,000 round of seed financing from two investment firms.  ...  in the process of qualifying graphene-based ultracapacitor electrodes, graphene production processes, and performance for a variety of related components.  [Austin Business Journal, Jan 16, 09]

Graphenix Development (Williamsville, NY)

Graphenix Development (Williamsville, NY;  no SBIR) is the latest early-stage company in Buffalo to pull in significant amounts of equity capital. ... veterans of Eastman Kodak and Dow Chemical have been working on commercialization for an ultra capacitor market that’s expected to reach $3 billion by 2020. ... Graphenix ultra capacitors store 20 to 30 percent more energy than the same-sized devices from competitors around the world, and it has used the Eastman facility to prove its technology on a large scale, [CEO Robert] Anstey said.  [Dan Miner, Buffalo Business First, Oct 13, 15]

New York State Energy Research and Development Authority awarded $250K to Graphenix Development  (Williamsville, NY; no SBIR) a startup company working to commercialize a nanostructured carbon electrode for high power, high energy ultracapacitors. Applications include hybrid vehicles, electric grid, industrial devices and energy efficiency applications. Under this program, the company will continue to improve electrode performance while scaling up the manufacturing process. [NYSERDA, Oct 27, 14]

Graphic Surgery (Creve Coeur, MO)

Graphic Surgery (Creve Coeur , MO; no SBIR) helps companies contain surgery costs through benefit plan design and patient education. Research by Graphic Surgery shows one out of three health care dollars was spent on surgeries in 2005, ... considers 75 percent of surgeries "discretionary, ...Founder Dr. Patricia Gelnar, a former neurologist, said Graphic Surgery wants to improve communication between patients and physicians, not interfere with it. She started the company to help physicians manage malpractice claims through better communication to patients about surgery's risks. Then, the St. Louis Business Health Coalition learned about the company and thought it could help employers. [Mary Jo Feldstein, St Louis Post Dispatch, Nov 14]

GraphLab (renamed Dato)

machine learning company GraphLab (Fremont, WA; no SBIR, founded 2013, 27 employees) announced an $18.5 million funding round led by Paul Allen's Vulcan Capital. ...  also renaming the company "Dato."   The series B funding brings the company's total funding to date up to $25.25 million   [Rachel Lerman, Puget Sound Business Journal, Jan 8, 15]

Univ of Washington will announce that seventeen startups were started last fiscal year to exploit technology developed at the school. Among the ventures it called out is GraphLab, Professor Carlos Guestrin’s analytics venture, which draws on his research into machine learning. Also noted was PatientStream, an electronic information system developed at Harborview Medical Center that replaces traditional whiteboards in hospitals.  [Brier Dudley, Seattle Times, Jul 17, 13] The UW Center for Commercialization says UW students, faculty or technology are behind more than 250 companies.

Grassroots Biotechnology (Durham, NC)

Grassroots Biotechnology  (Durham, NC; $1.1M SBIR) Duke spinoff has been acquired by agrobiotech Monsanto after a long-term partnership between the two companies.... developed a gene expression platform and other agricultural technologies to complement Monsanto’s portfolio, was founded in 2007 . [Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Jun 21, 13]

GrayBug (Baltimore,MD)

Aerie Pharmaceuticals  (Bedminster, NJ; no SBIR), the Duke University spin-out working on experimental treatments for glaucoma, and GrayBug  (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR), a venture-stage pharma working toward treatments for ocular diseases including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, finalized a research collaboration and license agreement.  ...  Initially, the partnership will focus on evaluating the ability of GrayBug’s polymer-based delivery technology to provide a multimonth drug release capability for an Aerie small molecule for wet AMD. [Jason deBruyn,  Triangle Business Journal, Aug 7, 15]

  GrayBug (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR, founded 2011) raised $1.74 million [Series A2] to advance development of its preclinical drug for age-related macular degeneration. ... GrayBug's GB-102 is designed to reduce the frequency patients with age-related macular degeneration would have to undergo medication injections.  [Sarah Gantz, Baltimore Business Journal, Mar 10, 15]  developing a continuum of proprietary micro – and nanoparticle controlled release technologies and implants for strategic partnership and its own therapeutic products for major ocular disease indications including wet AMD and Glaucoma.  [company website]

Graybug Vision (Redwood City, CA)

Graybug Vision (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR), raised $44.5 million in a Series B round to push its wet age-related macular degeneration drug through Phase 2 trials.  [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, May 6, 16]

Great Basin Scientific (Salt Lake City, UT)

Great Basin Scientific up 10% [Jun 19, 15]

Great Basin Scientific down 11% [Jun 10, 15]

Great Basin Scientific down 11% [May 28, 15]

Great Basin Scientific up 29% [May 27, 15]

Great Basin Scientific down 10% [May 21, 15]

Great Basin Scientific up 26% [May 20,15]

Great Basin Scientific down 11% [May 18, 15]

Great Basin Scientific down 11% [Apr 24,15]

Great Basin Scientific up 41% [Apr 22,15] announced that the FDA has granted clearance for its molecular diagnostic test for Group B Streptococcus (GBS). This is Great Basin's second assay to be cleared by the FDA [company press release, Apr 22, 15]

Great Basin Scientific up 13% [Apr 17,15]

Great Basin Scientific up 43% [Apr 13,15] 

Great Basin Scientific down 12% [Apr 10,15]

Great Basin Scientific down 14% [Apr 6,15]

Great Basin Scientific up 13% [Apr 1,15]

Great Basin Scientific (Salt Lake City, UT; no SBIR, founded 2003) up 60% [Mar 31,15]  announced that the US Patent and Trademark Office issued a notice of allowance for the Company’s method of isothermal helicase - dependent amplification (HDA) using blocked primers (bp), or “bpHDA .   bpHDA creates a highly specific ”hot-start functionality which increases the amplification speed, improves assay sensitivity and expands multiplex capabilities of Great Basin’s sample -to-result molecular diagnostic testing technology. bpHDA is the basis of the Company’s Clostridium difficile (C. diff) molecular diagnostic test assay     [company press release, March 31,15] raised $24M in Feb 2015 IPO

GreatGrow Maryland (Rock Hall, MD)

Fifteen university research teams from Maryland will receive a total of $4.1 million to work with local companies to turn their research into products that could one day be sold on the commercial market.  .... MIPS will contribute $1.8 million and private companies will contribute $2.8 million. The companies:  A&G Pharmaceutical (Columbia, MD; no SBIR),  Rehabtics LLC (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR)  High Impact Environmental (Church Hill, MD; no SBIR),  Birich Technologies (Towson, MD; no SBIR), Earth Networks (Germantown, MD; no SBIR), Fiberight (Halethorpe, MD; no SBIR), CoolCAD Electronics (College Park,MD $1.6M SBIR), XChanger Companies (Annapolis, MD; no SBIR), Remedium Technologies (College Park, MD; no SBIR), Pothole Pros LLC (Waldorf, MD; no SBIR), Hoopers Island Oyster Aquaculture (Fishers Creek, MD; no SBIR),  Metompkin Seafood (Crisfield, MD; no SBIR) GreatGrow Maryland LLC (Rock Hall, MD; no  SBIR), vCalc (Hagerstown, MD;  SBIR), Shore Thing Shellfish (Tall Timbers, MD; no SBIR). ($114,094)  [Sarah Gantz,  Baltimore Business Journal, Feb 26, 14] 

GreatPoint Energy

Great Point Energy (Brookline MA; one SBIR) raised $100M to commercialize its technology, which converts coal into natural gas. Dow Chemical Co. and Citi Sustainable Development Investments led the Series C financing round. [Wall Street Journal, Oct 29]

the company that has been operating the experimental reactor for 18 months now, GreatPoint Energy (no SBIR), has raised $137M from some of the biggest names in industry and venture capital, ... raised its first round of venture finance in 2005 from previous (co-founder) Perlman backers ...  applying a (undisclosed) catalyst directly to the coal and recovering the catalyst from the char... another lucky break when they found that the Gas Technology Institute had built a $60 M test plant and was looking for revenue after losing government funding from a tax on pipelines. [Daniel Fisher, Forbes, Oct 29]

Green & Grow (Austin, TX)

Green & Grow (Austin, TX; no SBIR) agriculture technology startup that wants to improve crop yields has raised $6 million to test and commercialize its products.  ....  founded in Phoenix in 2011 and moved its headquarters to Austin in March to be closer to research partners at the University of Texas and Texas A&M University.  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American Statesman, Aug 28, 14]  in the 2013 IPSA trials, GGI products were the #1 performing yield enhancement seed treatment product across both Corn and Soybean [company website]

GreenFuel Technologies

A Cambridge firm developing algae farms to recycle carbon dioxide from industrial emissions and provide feedstock for biofuels and other products said it raised nearly $14 million in venture capital. GreenFuel Technologies , founded in 2001, said it is using the money to further develop its farming technology and move toward commercial scale operations. [Boston Globe, May 16, 08]

Greenlight Biosciences (Medford, MA)

Cells without walls.  Synvitrobio (Berkeley, CA; no SBIR) accelerates bio-discovery through cell-free systems. Synvitrobio's Next Generation Expression platform allows for high-throughput data collection that is real and experimentally validated - not simulation.  ...  At present, Synvitrobio is using its system to test DNA sequences (or, rather, the resulting proteins) to see if they might be worth investigating as antibiotic drugs.  ... Sutro Biopharma  (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) uses a cell-free system to create antibodies for the treatment of cancer.  ... Genomatica (San Diego, CA; $6M SBIR), an established biotechnology firm based, is experimenting with a cell-free system which produces 1,4-butanediol in this way from simple sugars. 1,4-butanediol is a small molecule that is used to make polymers such as Lycra. .... GreenLight Biosciences, (Medford, MA; no SBIR) proposes to use its own cell-free system, also based on E. coli, to produce industrial quantities of an undigestible analogue of ribose, a naturally occurring sugar, for use in zero-calorie beverages  .... the idea of stripping molecular biology down to its bare essentials has an efficiency about it which suggests that, for some applications at least, the utility of the biological cell may have run its course.   [The Economist. May 6, 17

Greenlight Biosciences  (Medford, MA; no SBIR), a startup, engineers microbes to make various enzymes that can produce chemicals and then breaks open the bugs to harvest those enzymes.  .... The technology that keeps the exposed metabolic pathways working was developed by James Swartz, a biochemical engineer at Stanford University who left his position as a protein engineer at the biotechnology company Genentech to develop cell-free methods ....   received a $4.5 million grant from ARPA-E to develop a system for converting methane, the main ingredient in natural gas, to liquid fuel. [Susan Young, MIT Tech Review, Oct 17, 13]

Green Mountain Radio Research (Colchester, VT)

The rest of DOE,'s Phase II list also shows a preference for SBIR experience: Euclid Labs (Solon, OH; $18M SBIR since 2004, all DOE including one $10M award), four new Phase IIs;  Radiabeam Technologies (Santa Monica, CA, $10M SBIR since 2005  SBIR) three awards; Tech-x (Boulder, CO; something over $50M SBIR since 1994) three new awards Muons (Batavia, IL;  $13M since 2002 SBIR, all DOE) three awards; Far-Tech (San Diego, CA;$9+M SBIR since 2003) two awards; Ridgetop Group (Tucson, AZ; $10M SBIR since 2002) two awards;  Calabazas Creek Research (San Mateo, CA; $26M since 1994) two awards; Niowave (Lansing, MI;  $5M since 2007 SBIR) two awards; Mesa Photonics  (Santa Fe, NM;  $0.8M since 2008 SBIR) two awards; Green Mountain Radio Research ( Colchester, VT;  $5.7M SBIR)  two awards.  Of 104 awards, 33 went to multiple winners who already had collected $378M SBIR from the federal government.  Is DOE over-emphasizing contractor competence at the expense of companies and technologies with brighter futures?  No one knows becasue Congress shows little interest in the question, and the agency has a bias toward making itself smarter.  

GreenSight Agronomics (Boston, MA)

Executives from 11 New England robotics firms will travel to several cities in China later this month on a trade mission aimed at sparking business deals and more technology collaboration between the U.S. and China.  ...  large, well-established firms, such as iRobot and Vecna Technologies (Greenbelt, MD; $11M SBIR).  also small, young startups, including Soft Robotics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) and GreenSight Agronomics  (Boston, MA; no SBIR, over a decade of experience fielding these systems for customers including the Department of Defense and NASA).   [Jeff Engel, xconomy.com, Oct 14, 16]

Green Sulfcrete (Long Island, NY)

After a few years fine-tuning its investment strategy, Accelerate Long Island has seeded its first group of startups. The nonprofit organization and the Long Island Emerging Technologies Fund announced plans to put $500,000 into five Long Island, NY-based biotech and cleantech startups: Goddard Labs, Green Sulfcrete, PolyNova, SynchroPET, and Traverse Biosciences.  [Ben Fidler, xconomy.com, Jun 9, 14] None had SBIR.

GreenTech America

Purdue University says it helped launch 10 startup companies from July 2007 to June 2008, including GreenTech America, Intelliphage and Nutrabiotix. All use Purdue-licensed technologies. Purdue Research Foundation's Office of Technology Commercialization also reported more than $4.1 million in royalties for that time frame.  [Indianapolis Star, Jul 29]

Green Volts (Fremont, CA)

Greentech Media and GigaOm are reporting that solar company GreenVolts (Fremont, CA; no SBIR) has laid off the bulk of its staff after investor ABB pulled out. ...  debuted the big flower arrays this year, after going dark for a couple of years to revamp its technology. The latest technology looks nothing like the original technology the company first showed off back in 2008 which had tons of curved mirrors concentrating the sun onto solar cells. That technology, it turned out, was too expensive to produce and didn't work for a variety of other reasons.  [San Francisco Business Times, Sep 20, 12]

Greenwich Geriatrics (Buffalo, NY)

A high-tech mix of five [more] start-up and relocated companies will locate in University at Buffalo [NY] facilities: Cytocybernetics  (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR), a new company pledged to create four new jobs, invest $41,000 and has developed a device that aims to help improve drug safety screening for the pharmaceutical industry; Greenwich Geriatrics (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR) , a new company which pledged to create 20 new jobs, invest $355,000 ...  company’s decision-support software aims to help caregivers and health professionals make recommendations for individuals with complex medical problems;  Geocove (Orlando, FL; no SBIR), expanding to Buffalo, pledged to create five new jobs, invest $60,000 builds custom GIS tools to a multitude of industries, and will partner with UB’s geography department and GIS program.Zintera (San Diego, CA; no SBIR)  expanding in Buffalo, pledged to create five new jobs, invest $91,000 ...  company’s platform uses an approximation of the biological human mind to pursue solutions in healthcare, genomics and life sciences applications;  Natural Energy Systems, (Canadian), pledged to create five new jobs and invest $50,000. .. converts sustainable organic waste to clean-burning renewable fuel using a process patented by the company’s founder.  [Dan Miner, Buffalo Business First, Apr 27, 15]

GridBridge (Raleigh, NC)

GridBridge (Raleigh, NC; no SBIR, 10 employees) getting big attention from government agencies who are looking to apply its technology in everything from NASA research to, this week, Army vehicles. ....   was listed last year alongside John Deere and RF Microdevices as a partner in a President Barack Obama-announced Department of Energy Consortium at N.C. State University, confirms it’s leading two new federal contracts. ....  working alongside another Consortium partner, Cree, on a project that will connect and integrate battery energy storage in the electrical grid. ....  a project that Cree co-founder John Palmour calls “revolutionary.”   [Lauren K. Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Jun 17, 15]

GridBridge (Raleigh, NC; no SBIR, 10 employees) startup hand-picked by President Barack Obama’s team for a $140 million manufacturing initiative at N.C. State University– just snagged another honor and $700,000 [NSF SBIR].  ... the technology, dubbed a Grid Energy Router, helps locations and utilities integrate many distributed sources of power while also increasing system efficiency and safety. It’s applications range from aerospace to vehicles.  [Lauren K. Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Sep 10, 14]

Gritstone Oncology (Emeryville, CA)

Gritstone Oncology (Emeryville, CA; no SBIR, founded 2015 with initial funding from leading blue-chip biotechnology investors), a next-generation personalized cancer immunotherapy company, announced the successful completion of a $92.7 million Series B preferred stock financing. Proceeds from the financing will be used to advance Gritstone’s tumor antigen identification platform and pipeline of personalized cancer immunotherapies. The company’s lead program, targeting tumor-specific neoantigens, is expected to enter clinical trials in mid-2018, initially in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and gastric cancer.   [company press release, Sep 7, 17]

biotech startup Gritstone Oncology (Emeryville, CA and Cambridge, MA;  no SBIR) will use a $102 million venture capital investment to anchor its climb toward cancer's latest, greatest summit. ...  aims to develop "cancer vaccines" that can be adapted to specific patients at specific times by targeting so-called tumor-specific neoantigens, or new, unique amino acid tags that emerge as cancer cells mutate. ...  initially will focus on discovering and developing therapies based on tumor-specific neo-antigens, or TSNAs, for non-small cell lung cancer.  [Ron Leuty, San Francisco Business Times, Oct 20, 15]

GRO Biosciences (Boston, MA)

GRO Biosciences (Boston, MA; no SBIR), the latest startup from the labs of Harvard University genetics professor George Church, raised $2.1 million in seed funding ... developing genetically altered bacteria that are meant to help boost the potency and durability of protein drugs. [Frank Vinluan, xconomy.com, Sep 29, 17]

Group14 Technologies (Seattle, WA)

Group14 Technologies (Seattle, WA; no SBIR) a new spin-out from EnerG2 is developing a technology that could boost lithium ion battery energy density by up to 30 percent, it claims, while also reducing costs.  ...  won a $2.8 million Department of Energy grant to advance development of a novel nano-scale material for the anode of lithium ion batteries   [Benjamin Romano, xconomy.com, Apr 14, 16]

Grove Instruments (Worcester,MA)

Grove Instruments  (Worcester, MA; $400K SBIR) closed an oversubscribed $6 million Series B Preferred Stock offering, according to a news release from the developer of a noninvasive blood glucose meter. [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Dec 20, 11]

The Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a quasi-public agency, awarded $3.75 million in loans to five early-stage life sciences companies. AesRX (Newton, MA; no SBIR)  biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of sickle cell disease and other orphan drugs; MoMelan Technologies (MA; no SBIR) medical device company; Myomo (Cambridge,MA; one SBIR) focused on helping people move again after a neuro-muscular impairment; ECI Biotech (Worcester, MA $1.6M SBIR) developer and manufacturer of affordable diagnostic sensors that can be incorporated into any consumer product or medical device; and Grove Instruments (Worcester, MA; $400K SBIR)developing a painless, noninvasive technology that accurately measures blood sugar.  [Boston Globe, Mar 23, 11]

Grow Home Organics (Guilford, CT)

[The] company that makes a Bluetooth-enabled meat thermometer has received a $100,000 grant a $250,000 loan from the state in the latest round of Small Business Express aid packages  iDevices (Avon, CT; no SBIR), launched the iGrill meat thermometer [that] can communicate with an iPhone or iPad through a wireless Bluetooth connection, and let its user know when the meat is ready.  ....  Grow Home Organics (Guilford, CT;  no SBIR) which makes products for outdoor kitchens and gardens, is receiving a matching grant of $83,800, ... Connecticut Valley Bindery (New Britain, CT; no SBIR) is receiving a matching grant of $50,000. ....Wethersfield Offset (Rocky Hill, CT;  noSBIR), a commercial printer, is receiving a matching grant of $55,721 ... Fire Alarm Specialty Design (Windham, CT;  SBIR) which designs fire and security alarm systems for healthcare, educational, municipal, commercial, and industrial uses, is receiving a $100,000 matching grant and a loan of $100,000. [Hartford Courant, Jul 11, 12]  Even though states complain of financial distress, they continue to put public money into private enterprise with little hope of economic return to preserve jobs. It's all politics. So what happens next year when the grants expire and such investment is still uneconomic for private investment?

GSI Technology

GSI Technology (Santa Clara, CA) filed for an IPO  It provides static random access memory, or SRAM, chips that are used mainly in networking and telecommunications equipment. [San Jose Mercury News, Jan 11]  No SBIRs, and it makes a profit.

GT Advanced Technologies (Merrimack, NH)

GT Advanced Technologies (Nashua, NH; no SBIR)  stock nose dived after the supplier of manufacturing equipment for solar and energy products said it would cut 25 percent of its staff. As of June the company had approximately 600 employees in Salem, Mass., New Hampshire, and Asia. [Mass High Tech, Nov 2, 12]

GT Advanced Technologies (Merrimack, NH formerly called GT Solar, no SBIR)  has acquired Confluence Solar ( Hazelwood, MO; no SBIR) for up to $80 million. [Mass High Tech, Aug 25, 11]

GTC Biotherapeutics

GTC Biotherapeutics (Framingham, MA; $5M SBIR) and Ovation Pharmaceuticals (no SBIR) said that they have entered into a collaboration agreement to develop and market a drug treatment called ATryn in the United States. [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Jun 24]

GTC Biotherapeutics said it gained orphan status for its treatment ATryn for a rare blood disorder called hereditary antithrombin deficiency. [Mass High Tech, Dec 10, 07]

GTC Biotherapeutics (Framingham MA; $3M SBIR) won FDA fast-track designation  for ATryn, a protein produced in the milk of goats that has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. [Boston Globe, Sep 5, 07]

GTC Biotherapeutics has entered into a strategic collaboration with French firm LFB Biotechnologies, a wholly owned subsidiary of LFB S.A., to develop recombinant plasma proteins and monoclonal antibodies using GTC's transgenic production platform. LFB Biotechnologies will purchase $25 million of GTC common and convertible preferred shares, and convertible debt. [Mass High Tech, Oct 2, 06]

GTC Biotherapeutics got a $1.4 M NIH SBIR for its CD137 monoclonal antibody program. The company in-licensed the antibody from the Mayo Clinic in 2004, when it received an initial SBIR grant of $780,000.  ... It expects to use the new SBIR grant to continue preclinical evaluation of the antibody. [Sep 06]

GTC Biotherapeutics raised another $17M.  Founded in 1993 as a spinout of Genzyme Corp. and originally named Genzyme Transgenics Corp., GTC Biotherapeutics develops and markets therapeutic proteins through transgenic animal technology. In 2005, the company, which employs 130, reported revenue of about $5 million.  [Mass High Tech, Jul 18] At least $3M came from HHS SBIR awards 2003-2005.

G-Tech Medical (Palo Alto, CA)

Wealthy investor Peter Thiel put money into three biotech startups through his Breakout Labs, a nonprofit fund aimed at scientific innovation.  Breakout Labs, led by Executive Director Lindy Fishburne, has now invested in 19 companies.  The three most recent investments are:   Cortexyme (San Francisco, CA;  no SBIR) seeking treatments for Alzheimer's and other aging disorders;      G-Tech Medical (Palo Alto, CA;  no SBIR) working on a wireless, wearable sensor that will track muscle activity in a person's gastrointestinal system;    EpiBone  (New York, NY; no SBIR) engineers a patient's own living bone to fit where there's a defect. Breakout Labs gives up to $350,000 to the startups it supports.  [Silicon Valley Business Journal, Jun 11, 14] 

GT Equipment (Merrimack, NH)

GT Equipment (Merrimack, NH) claims three new SBIR/STTR awards as a sweetener to being named Environmental Exporter of the Year by the US Export-Import Bank. GT has formerly been called Ferrofluidics and FerroTec, or maybe GT Solar and GT Crystal. Perhaps its  international reputation for delivering high quality, cost effective products that consistently exceed customer expectations will keep it from going down the same photovoltaic tubes as Astropower

GTI Diagnostics (Waukesha, WI)

medical test maker Gen-Probe (San Diego, CA; three SBIRs) said Thursday that it acquired GTI Diagnostics (Waukesha, WI; three SBIRs long ago), a specialty diagnostics company for $53 million in cash.  ... Gen-Probe bought GTI from Riverside Co., a Cleveland private equity firm that acquired the company in 2008. [signonsandiego.com, Dec 16, 10]

GTx (Memphis, TN)

GTx (Memphis, TN; $300K SBIR) down 22% [Jun 13,17]  after 99% rise on Jun 12 after announced release of preliminary clinical data from its ongoing, open-label, Phase 2 clinical trial of enobosarm 3 mg (GTx-024) in postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). [company press release, Jun 12, 17]

GTx (Memphis, TN; $300K SBIR in 2003) down 22% [May 25,17]

Guardant Health (Redwood City, CA)

Guardant Health  (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) that sells blood tests to track and, potentially, detect cancer, is announcing this morning that it has raised $360 million from investors, with the goal of deploying its test in 1 million people over the next five years.  That brings the total Guardant has raised to $550 million. ...  Guardant has a new competition: A Silicon Valley company called Grail, spun out of DNA sequencing giant Illumina. Earlier this year, Grail announced that it had raised $900 million from the likes of Bristol-Myers Squibb and Johnson & Johnson.  [Matthew Herper, Forbes, May 11, 17]

Guardant Health (Redwood City, CA;  no SBIR) diagnostics firm, raised $100 million in a Series D round to ramp up marketing efforts for its cancer genome diagnostic product, Guardant360. The “liquid biopsy” test detects cells that growing tumors have sloughed off into a patient’s bloodstream, and it only requires a blood draw.  [Alex Lash, xconomy.com, Jan 8, 16]

With its promise of low-cost, cancer-monitoring "liquid biopsies," Guardant Health (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) raised $50 million in a Series C round.  ... has sold its blood test since June ...  has raised just under $100 million, the company said.  ... Companies focusing on liquid biopsies — simple blood tests to detect cancer signatures — were all the rage at last month's J.P. Morgan healthcare Conference.  ...  Critics claim liquid biopsies haven't proved that they are ready for prime time, namely because there is scant evidence that test results lead doctors to switch to treatments that help patients fight off cancer. But proponents say the tests promise more-accurate results that will lower the cost of cancer detection because they collect DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream rather than relying on hit-or-miss tissue samples.  [Ron Leuty, San Francisco Business Times, Feb 3, 15]      

Guardant Health (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) raised a $50 million Series C round to expand availability of its Guardant360 blood-based cancer test.  [Alex Lash, xconomy.com, Feb 6, 15]

Guided Surgery Solutions (Wellesley, MA)

The [Massachusetts Life Sciences Center] said it also awarded a $520,000 accelerator loan to Guided Surgery Solutions,(Wellesley, MA; no SBIR) medical device company that is working on a 3D image-based drill guide to enable dentists to place dental implants with greater accuracy.  [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Dec 19, 13]

Guided Therapeutics (Norcross, GA)

Guided Therapeutics (Norcross, GA; $2.7M SBIR ($2.5M in one)) will now offer its LuViva Advanced Cervical Scan in Bulgaria, which will be the 21st country where the cancer detection technology is available.  ... uses spectroscopy to measure how light interacts with cervical tissue  [Ellie Hensley, Atlanta Business Chronicle, Aug 26, 15]

Guided Therapeutics (Norcross, GA; $2.7M SBIR) was granted a key U.S. patent for its LuViva Advanced Cervical Scan, the company announced .... biophotonic technology uses light to earlier detect diseases at a cellular level. LuViva scans the cervix with light and uses spectroscopy to measure how light interacts with cervical tissue.    [Ellie Hensley, Atlanta Business Chronicle, Jul 16, 14] 

Guided Therapeutics (Norcross GA; $2/7M SBIR) will submit an amended premarket approval application for its LuViva Advanced Cervical Scan, which was not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration when the company filed an application last September. [Ellie Hensley, Atlanta Business Chronicle, May 14, 14]

Guided Therapeutics (Norcross, GA;  $2.7M SBIR) has raised $5.4 million in a stock offering. ...  develops obiophotonic technology that utilizes light to detect disease at the cellular level. ... is commercializing the LuViva Advanced Cervical Scan and Cervical Guide single-patient-use disposable.  [Urvaksh Karkaria, Atlanta Business Chronicle, Jul 5, 13]

Guided Therapeutics (Norcross, GA; $2.7M SBIR) has raised nearly $3 million, according to a [SEC] filing.  ....   develops obiophotonic technology that utilizes light to detect disease at the cellular level.  .... commercializing the LuViva Advanced Cervical Scan and Cervical Guide single-patient-use disposable.  [Urvaksh Karkaria, Atlanta Business Journal, Jun 4, 13]

Guided Therapeutics (Norcross, GA; no SBIR)  reported it landed a $2.5 million matching grant form the National Cancer Institute for its “LightTouch” non-invasive cervical cancer detection technology. ... Including this latest grant, the company has taken in $6 million in six consecutive grants from the NCI to develop the new, pain-free test for detecting cervical disease. [Atlanta Business Chronicle, Oct 5, 09]

Guided Therapy Systems (Mesa, AZ)

Guided Therapy Systems (Mesa, AZ; one SBIR, founded 1994, 20 employees), which founded Ulthera LLC, is getting into the musculoskeletal business.  .... recognized as one of the world’s first companies to develop and commercialize products that combine ultrasound imaging with therapeutic ultrasound.  [Angela Gonzales, Phoenix Business Journal, May 22, 14]

Gynesonics (Redwood City, CA)

Women’s healthcare company Gynesonics (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR, founded 2005) disclosed $43 million in equity financing  to develop minimally invasive solutions for symptomatic uterine fibroids.  [Cromwell Schubarth, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Jul 23, 15]

G-Zero Therapeutics (Chapel Hill, NC )

G-Zero Therapeutics (Chapel Hill, NC; $700K SBIR) spinoff that is developing drugs to protect patients from cellular damage caused by radiation or chemotherapy has won a $3 million [NIH SBIR Phase II] grant to bring its products to market.... started in 2008 based on technologies from UNC-CH ... showed that treatment with certain of these agents causes specific groups of bone marrow cells to temporarily stop dividing.  [Raleigh News & Observer, Sep 30, 11]

H2O Score (Madison, WI)

Four water technology startups were named for an inaugural "seed accelerator program" at the soon-to-open Global Water Center business incubator facility in Milwaukee: Microbe Detectives (Madison, WI; no SBIR);  H2O Score (Milwaukee, WI; no SBIR),  Noah Technologies (Milwaukee, WI; no SBIR); and one with a parent company in France, called Vegetal i.D. Each company will receive a $50,000 WEDC grant to cover startup costs, and space in the Global Water Center, a seven-story warehouse that has been converted at a cost of $22 million.   [John Schmid, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jul 17, 13]  A good deal for the warehouse converting business; value for the state economy TBD (don't expect to recover the cost of the warehouse conversion for perhaps decades).

H2Pump (Colonie, NY)

H2Pump (Latham, NY; no SBIR, founded 2005,15 full-time employees) will generate its first commercial revenue this year on its hydrogen recycling device. ...   installing its first commercial device at a site in Pennsylvania and will stay busy through 2014 fulfilling additional commercial orders, says CEO and president Mark Sperry.  ... device captures hydrogen-rich exhaust created in manufacturing processes. The device then purifies the hydrogen and uses the gas again in the manufacturing process.  [Megan Rogers, Albany Business Review, Aug 19, 14] 

H2Pump (Latham, NY; no SBIR)  has been awarded $1.8 million by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to help commercialize the company's technology. ... money to install six of its hydrogen-recycling devices at four sites around the state  ....   started in 2005, began developing its technology in 2006. The company employs 15 full-time and three part-time employees.  [Pam Allen, The Buusiness Review (Albany), Jan 29, 13]

New York tech investmentH2Pump, a start-up in Colonie NY, will get $395K to develop a 3-in-1 hydrogen pump to separate, pump and compress hydrogen through an electrochemical process. According to NYSERDA, this would avoid high energy-consumptive methods of gas separation, and mechanical pumping and compression.  Plug Power Inc., a Latham fuel-cell developer, will get a $400,000 research grant for membrane technology. [Albany Times Union, Feb 7]

H2Sonics (Glastonbury, CT)

H2Sonics (Glastonbury, CT; no SBIR) which says it has proprietary technology that uses sonic energy to manufacture hydrogen and aluminum oxide for use in alternative energy, has raised the first $900,000 of an open-ended round of financing, according to federal filings. [Don Seiffert, Mass High Tech, Jul 9, 12]

H3 Biomedicine (Cambridge,MA)

H3 Biomedicine (who needs SBIR?) a personalized cancer drug discovery company launched earlier this year,  is opening its new headquarters and 24,000 square feet of laboratory space in Cambridge this afternoon. The privately held company has $200 million in research funding from Japanese pharmaceutical maker Eisai. [Lori Valigra, Mass High Tech, Dec 1, 11]

Halozyme San Diego, CA)

Halozyme Thera up 18% [Jan 5, 17]

biotech  Halozyme (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) said  that it will sell 8.3 million shares of common stock to the public [Keith Darce, San Diego Union Tribune, Sep 9, 10]

Hana Biosciences (South San Francisco, CA)

Hana Biosciences (South San Francisco, CA; one SBIR) plans to raise up to $100 million by selling preferred stock to two investors  ... to prepare and submit a Food and Drug Administration application for its leukemia drug Marqibo. As of March 31, Hana had accumulated a deficit of $140.6 million   [Stephen EF Brown, San Francisco Business Times, Jun 8,10]

Hansen Energy and Environmental (Garland, UT)

Hansen Energy and Environmental (Garland, UT; one SBIR) received $198,500 as part of more than $18 million in Conservation Innovation Grants awarded for 55 projects nationally to develop cutting-edge technologies to help farmers and ranchers conserve natural resources. ...  to demonstrate an economical method to convert methane produced from farm waste products into a liquid fuel.  [Salt Lake Tribune, Jul 16, 09]

Hansen Medical (Mountain View, CA)

Stealthy startup Auris Surgical Robotics (San Carlos, CA; no SBIR) disclosed that it has raised $150 million ...  the fourth robotic surgery business co-founded by Dr. Frederic Moll. He previously co-founded Intuitive Surgical  ($2.5M SBIR) , Hansen Medical (no SBIR), Endotherapeutics (no SBIR), and Origin Medsystems (no SBIR) ....has now raised a total of $185 million.  [Cromwell Schubarth, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Sep 24, 15]

Hansen Medical (founded 2002; Mountain View, CA; no SBIR) up 28%  as it signed a new partnership with conglomerate General Electric to promote Hansen's catheter-implanting medical robots, though financial details weren't disclosed.  [Wall Street Journal, May 8, 09]  PO 2006, 208 employees, formerly named AutoCath

Dr. Frederic H. Moll, 56, is a soft-spoken man who can look uncomfortable on stage. Yet his role in founding Intuitive Surgical ($2.5M SBIR), the company that now dominates the field, and his current involvement with three other robotics companies, has kept him in the sights of investors, health care providers and fellow entrepreneurs.  ... He took the idea to his employer, Guidant, a medical device company. Guidant decided that robotic surgery was too futuristic and too risky, so Dr. Moll rounded up backers, resigned, and in 1995, founded Intuitive Surgical. [which] earned $144M last year on sales of $600M .... He’s now best known as chief executive of Hansen Medical  (no SBIR), a publicly traded robotics company focused on minimally invasive cardiac care. But he’s also an investor in and a board member of Mako Surgical (no SBIR), an orthopedics robotics company that recently went public, and he is a co-founder and chairman of Restoration Robotics (no SBIR), a start-up company focused on cosmetic surgery. [Barnaby Feder, New York Times, May 4]

Haplogen Genomics

Edico Genome (La Jolla, CA; no SBIR, founded 2013) took first place [in The Scientist top ten innovation list] for its Dragen Bio-IT Processor. The add-on card accelerates the analysis of genomic data by a factor of 30, says Pieter van Rooyen, Edico's president and chief executive.  ....  Genome sequencers from Illumina took second and third place   [Bradley Fikes, utsandiego.com, Dec 1, 14]  Other winners: BioNano Genomics, RainDance Technologies  (Lexington, MA; $1.1M SBIR) , Leica Microsystems, Organovo  (San Diego, CA; $300K SBIR), Haplogen Genomics, Immucor, Sciencescape.    [The Scientist, Dec 1, 14]

Harbor Technologies (Brunswick ME)

Harbor Technologies (Brunswick, ME), a provider of innovative and cost-effective composite solutions to the marine infrastructure market, announces that it has received a $418,500 development grant from the Maine Technology Institute to purchase and further develop a machine to produce composite marine pilings in a continuous manner. [Mainetoday.com, Aug 26]

Hardcore Computer (Rochester, MN)

Hardcore Computer (Rochester, MN; no SBIR) start-up's "liquid immersion cooling technology" significantly boosts the performance of high-end computers by reducing the excess heat that these power-sucking machines typically generate.  ....  Since 2007, the company has raised more than $3 million  [Thomas Lee, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Dec 18]

HarkerBio (Buffalo, NY)

HarkerBio (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR, founded 2014) Hauptman-Woodward spinoff  raised $1.3 million in equity financing to support operations and growth  [Dan Miner, Buffalo Business First, Apr 20, 17] ... Two years ago Albany Molecular Research (aka AMRI) announced that it has signed a collaborative agreement with HarkerBIO LLC to co-market their structure-based drug discovery services to global pharmaceutical and biotechnology clients. [Harker press release, Jun 1, 15]

Albany Molecular Research announced a collaborative agreement with biotechnology companyHarkerBio LLC (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR)  to co-market their structure-based drug discovery services to global pharmaceutical and biotechnology clients. As part of the three-year agreement, AMRI gains access to HarkerBIO's uniquely differentiated high-resolution, structure-determination expertise and capabilities.  AMRI is a partner in The Buffalo Medical Innovation and Commercialization Hub at the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus is part of a 10-year, $1 billion public-private research and development initiative announced by New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo in December 2012. AMRI, a recognized leader in drug discovery, development and manufacturing services, is a partner in this initiative.   [AMRI press release, Jun 1, 15]  provides services to rapidly and cost effectively advance the development of pharmaceuticals. ... We integrate atomic-resolution structures in therapeutic R&D pipelines to dramatically shorten the timeline to clinical trials.  [Harker website]

HarkerBio LLC (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR) signed a new [three-year] agreement with Albany Molecular Research to co-market drug discovery services on a global scale.  ...  HarkerBio spun off late last year from Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute. The company helps pharmaceutical and research clients hasten their drug discovery process using X-ray crystallography and specialized protein testing available at HWI.  [Tracey Drury, Buffalo Business First, Jun 1, 15]

Harmony Enterprises (Harmony, MN)

Meanwhile, subsdies in Minnesota. The state of Minnesota approved its first five grants worth $2.27 million to manufacturers as part of the new, $24 million Job Creation Fund. The fund hopes to attract scores of companies to Minnesota and to encourage firms here to stay and expand in the state. ...  So far, the state has approved grants to Axis Clinicals (Dilworth, MN; no SBIR) ($779,988) an India-based clinical-trials laboratory that decided to open a new $12 million facility in Dilworth with 100 employees. , Heraeus Medical Components (White Bear Township, MN; no SBIR) ($498,100) Heraeus Medical is expected to add 55 workers. It plans to spend $7.8 million to renovate its existing plant,  Bluegrass Proteins (Dawson, MN; no SBIR) ($650,000) Kentucky-based Bluegrass Proteins will bring 56 jobs, plans to invest $18.2 million to buy and retrofit the Associated Milk Producers’ raw milk plant,  Harmony Enterprises(Harmony, MN; no SBIR) ($215,000),  and Valmont Industries(Farmington, MN; no SBIR) ($129,000).  an aluminum pole maker with operations in Minnesota, Indiana and Canada... makes waste compactors and recycling balers. Its plans include 14 new hires and a $1.1 million plant expansion.  will add 15 workers.  Combined, the five companies plan to add 240 jobs in Minnesota. [Dee DePass, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Apr 1, 14]

Harpoon Medical (Stevensville, MD)

Harpoon Therapeutics (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR, founded 2015) raised $45 million in a Series B round of funding to bring two cancer immunotherapies into clinical trials. ....  Harpoon’s first clinical candidate, HPN424, is a prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeting TriTAC™. HPN424 is in development for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer and is expected to enter Phase 1 clinical trials in 2018. The company anticipates additional clinical candidates to be identified and move into development within the next year   [company website, May 26, 17]

medical device company Harpoon Medical (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR)  raised $1.4 million in convertible debt ... toward an in-progress early feasibility study and the start of a larger clinical trial for the company’s minimally invasive device for repairing the heart’s mitral valve.  ....  will keep trials moving forward as Harpoon chases a larger Series B round. Harpoon previously raised $3.2 million in Series A  [Sarah Gantz, Baltimore Business Journal , Sep 15, 15]

medical device company Harpoon Medical (Stevensville, MD; no SBIR) reported it had raised $3.2 million in a Series A round of financing. ...  The state’s seed and early stage investment fund contributed $500,000.  ...   developing a minimally invasive surgical tool that would allow surgeons to repair the heart’s mitral valve through a small incision between the ribs while the heart is beating. [Sarah Gantz, Baltimore Business Journal, Sep 10, 14]   serious R&D with high tech risk and big payoff if successful.

Harrisvaccines (Ames, IA)

animal vaccine producer Harrisvaccines (Ames, IA; $400K SBIR, founded 2005) recently acquired by Merck as part of its animal health division, launched  by then ISU professor Hank Harris and his postdoc Matt Erdman, who identified and sought to develop a vaccine from a wild strain of the devastating porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRS). They teamed up with AlphaVax  (Raleigh, NC: no SBIR), a human vaccine company, to apply its proprietary alphavirus-based technology to veterinary medicine for the first time. ...  Since the initial PRRS vaccine, Harrisvaccines has produced the first pig vaccines on the market for swine flu and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, as well as bird vaccines following the 2015 outbreak of avian flu that plagued the state’s chicken flocks  [Jenny Rood, the-scientist.com, Aug 1, 16]

Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology (now Biostage)

Ohio State University spinoff Nanofiber Solutions (Columbus, OH; one SBIR) is putting off a potential patent fight with a Harvard University spinoff over an artificial windpipe – and even finding a silver lining in the dispute.  ....surgeon, Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, used [his] model [artificial] trachea made by Nanofiber, and stem cells were seeded in the device in a bioreactor by Harvard Bioscience (Holliston, MA; $800K SBIR)  that fully credited its Columbus partner’s role in the operation.  A year later, Harvard Bioscience was marketing its own combination of a replica trachea and the bioreactor to grow cells, and preparing to spin off a company to make them. Nanofiber warned Harvard Bioscience in December 2012 that the product may infringe on its technology. .... A consultant [said] the trachea market is too small to merit suing, and there’s no way to prove economic damages in court. ....  Nanofiber is focusing instead on research on other organs, such as a joint project with Columbus-based Nationwide Children’s Hospital to make small intestines for infants  ... Harvard Bioscience, meanwhile, spun off Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology  Nov. 1 and gave it $15 million for operations.  [Carrie Ghose, Columbus Business First, Jan 7, 14] Nanofiber now says that its technology attracted $15M. ...also was awarded a $1.5 million Third Frontier loan under a new loan program that allows the proceeds to be used for operations and commercialization instead of only physical capital. ...also is in line for up to $1 million in angel and venture investment over the next year based on hitting milestones  [Carrie Ghose, Columbus Business First, Dec 12, 13]

Harvard Bioscience (Holliston, MA)

Harvard Bioscience  (Holliston, MA; $800K SBIR) down 17% [Oct 29, 15]

Ohio State University spinoff Nanofiber Solutions (Columbus, OH; one SBIR) is putting off a potential patent fight with a Harvard University spinoff over an artificial windpipe – and even finding a silver lining in the dispute.  ....surgeon, Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, used [his] model [artificial] trachea made by Nanofiber, and stem cells were seeded in the device in a bioreactor by Harvard Bioscience (Holliston, MA; $800K SBIR)  that fully credited its Columbus partner’s role in the operation.  A year later, Harvard Bioscience was marketing its own combination of a replica trachea and the bioreactor to grow cells, and preparing to spin off a company to make them. Nanofiber warned Harvard Bioscience in December 2012 that the product may infringe on its technology. .... A consultant [said] the trachea market is too small to merit suing, and there’s no way to prove economic damages in court. ....  Nanofiber is focusing instead on research on other organs, such as a joint project with Columbus-based Nationwide Children’s Hospital to make small intestines for infants  ... Harvard Bioscience, meanwhile, spun off Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology  Nov. 1 and gave it $15 million for operations.  [Carrie Ghose, Columbus Business First, Jan 7, 14] Nanofiber now says that its technology attracted $15M. ...also was awarded a $1.5 million Third Frontier loan under a new loan program that allows the proceeds to be used for operations and commercialization instead of only physical capital. ...also is in line for up to $1 million in angel and venture investment over the next year based on hitting milestones  [Carrie Ghose, Columbus Business First, Dec 12, 13]

Harvard Bioscience (Hollister, MA; $800K SBIR) spin-off is stepping up its production of synthetic tracheas to supply clinical trials. ...  Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology, or HART, is testing its synthetic trachea system in Russia and has plans for similar tests in the European Union this year. The company is working with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to set up a trial in the United States as well.  The synthetic windpipes are made by growing a patient’s own stem cells on a lab-made scaffold. In the future, this technique could be adapted to create other organs, such as a replacement esophagus, heart valve, or kidney.  [Susan Young, technologyreview.com, Jan 16, 14]

Ten months after disclosing plans to spin off its regenerative medicine device business through an initial public offering, Harvard Bioscience (Holliston, MA; $800K SBIR) has abandoned that strategy and will instead distribute shares of the subsidiary to current Harvard BioScience shareholders.   ....  will enable its Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology unit, known as HART, to operate independently with $15 million in financing from Harvard Bioscience to advance development of “bioartificial” organ parts such as replacement tracheas. [Robert Weisman, Boston Globe, Oct 18, 13]

Harvard Bioscience (Hollister, MA; $800K SBIR) down 14%  [Apr 10, 13]

Harvard Bioscience  up 11% [12/12/12]  ($900K SBIR)  disclosed plans to spin off its regenerative medicine device business through an IPO next year and give some stock to Harvard Bioscience investors. [Boston Globe, Dec 12]

Harvard Bioscience  (Holliston, MA; $800K SBIR) a medical equipment maker, said it has bought a business unit from a Swedish company that will help to broaden its line of biological research products. .... press release did not include financial details  [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Jul 1, 11]

Medical instruments maker Harvard Bioscience (Holliston, MA; $800K SBIR) said it has acquired Coulbourn Instruments (Whitehall, PA; no SBIR) , a private company that makes lab equipment for assessing learning and memory.  Harvard Bioscience estimates the total market for the instruments Coulbourn produces is between $40 million and $50 million. And it expects the company to add about $4 million in annual revenue.  [AP, Aug 23, 10]

Harvard Bioscience (Holliston, MA; one SBIR), that develops, manufactures, and markets a broad range of tools to advance life science research, said it has acquired Denville Scientific (no SBIR) for a purchase price projected to be about $24 million. [Boston Globe, Sep 3, 09]

Harvard Bioscience (Holliston MA; one SBIR), a maker of scientific research tools, reports it plans to repurchase $10M in company stock [Mass High Tech, Dec 7]  Should a company that pays dividends or re-purchases stock be barred from SBIR on grounds that it no longer needs government subsidy because it refuses to use its own $10M (in this case) capital for R&D investment? SBIR was meant as a complement to private capital, not a substitute.

Harvard Bioscience (Holliston, MA; one SBIR) completed the $5M cash purchase of Panlab SL of Barcelona, Spain. [Mass High Tech, Oct 12]

Harvest Automation (Groton, MA)

agricultural robotics company Harvest Automation (North Billerica, MA;  no SBIR) closed an $11.75 million Series C financing round, the company announced  [Sara Castellanos, Boston Business Journal, Oct 29, 13]

Martin Buehler, iRobot’s former director of research -  “Robot Guy” - touted the disruption that robotics companies in New England have made, such as Rethink Robotics (no SBIR),  iRobot  ($8M SBIR), Harvest Automation  (no SBIR), Kiva Systems (no SBIR; acquired by Amazon.com), Symbotic (no SBIR) and, of course, his company, Vecna Technologies (Greenbelt, MD; $8.5M SBIR). Buehler showed how iRobot’s devices are used in defenseapplications as well as cleaning floors, pools and gutters. He also showed how Harvest’s robots are used in labor-intensive agriculture applications. The audience was amazed by Kiva’s robots driving efficiency, and how the robots have replaced the “runners” who fill product orders.  [Patircia Resende, Boston Business Journal, Mar 7, 13]

Harvest Automation(Groton, MA; no SBIR) raised a $4 million tranche of a Series A round of funding, according to a company official. ... founded by ex-iRobot Corp. employees .. developing robots for materials handling, though it’s still stealthy about specific uses markets  [Mass High Tech, Jan 8, 10]

Harvest Power (Waltham, MA)

Food scraps and trashed Christmas trees could one day be a source of a billion-dollar business, according to Harvest Power (Waltham, MA; no SBIR), a start-up that just raised $110 million to help convert organic waste to energy and fertilizer. .... hoping to replicate in North America what countries such as Germany and Spain have been doing for years.   [Yulika Chernova, Wall Street Journal, Apr 12]  Since we were rich, we didn't see much need to recycle or conserve which leaders like VP Cheney denigrated as personal virtue but irrelevant. Making a profit frlom such conversion seems to be much harder than idealized. In the extreme, Harrisburg, PA went bust trying.

Harvest Power(Waltham, MA; no SBIR) raised $1.25 million of a targeted $2.25 million new funding round, according to a federal document. ...  making the company’s Series B round worth $58 million in total. ... Founded in 2008, building what it calls North America’s first commercial-scale, high solids anaerobic digestion facility [near] Vancouver BC.  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Sep 2, 11]

Harvest Power (Waltham, MA: no SBIR) a producer of energy and fertilizer from organic waste, said Wednesday it has received $51.7 million in Series B financing from investors including a firm co-founded by Al Gore. .. said the new funding will allow the company to expand throughout North America and “add to its toolkit of technologies.”  [Mass High Tech, Mar 16, 11]

Harvest Technologies (Belton, TX)

Stratasys said that it had bought Solid Concepts (Valencia, CA; $250K SBIR, 450 employees) [for as much as $295M] and Harvest Technologies (Belton, TX; no SBIR, 80 employees) [price undisclosed], that it says will complement its rapidly growing 3-D printing business.  [Mark Reilly, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Apr 2, 14] 

Healionics (Redmond, WA)

things are looking better: the research-oriented startups seem poised to survive the downturn, and long-awaited clinical results could propel larger companies like Dendreon to stardom. ...  despite the financial crisis, the Accelerator, a local incubator based in Seattle's Eastlake neighborhood, created three firms last year - Recodagen, GPC-Rx and Mirina(none had SBIR) ... "Seattle is really a town of development-stage biotechs," Miller said. ... Light Sciences Oncology (no SBIR), a firm that canceled its initial public offering last February, managed to raise $10 million from venture capitalists in July. Private investors provided Redmond-based Healionics (no SBIR) — which manufactures material for implants — with a $2.6 million boost in December.  In a deal that could yield big results, Bothell-based Acucela  (no SBIR), which is developing therapies to treat blindness, signed a partnership deal in September with Japanese firm Otsuka Pharmaceutical that could potentially bring it $258 million.   [Angel Gonzalez, Seattle Times, Jan 25, 09]

Healionics (Redmond, WA; no SBIR)said it raised $2.6 million in a second round of financing from private investors.  The medical device company manufactures a material for medical implants that's compatible with the body. It recently scored a multimillion-dollar deal to supply TR BioSurgical with material for a veterinary glaucoma implant scheduled for launch in the first quarter of 2009. The company, which spun off from the Ratner Biomedical Group incubator in 2007, raised $1.7 million in its first round earlier this year.  [Angel Gonzalez, Seattle Times, Dec 12, 08]

h3>Health Diagnostics Laboratories Richmond, VA)

True Health Diagnostics, a startup that launched out of the North Texas Enterprise Center last year, has bought one of its largest competitors, Health Diagnostics Laboratories (Richmond, VA; no SBIR) for $37.1 million. ... solidified at the auction of  Health Diagnostics, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.  [Danielle Abril,Dallas Business Journal, Sep 14, 15]

HealthMyne (Madison, WI)

HealthMyne (no SBIR) — which lists among its co-founders Rock Mackie, the University of Wisconsin-Madison medical physicist who developed the technology behind TomoTherapy  — said in late September that it had raised $6.9 million.   [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Oct 10, 16]

Veniti  (St Louis, MO; no SBIR), a medical device startup, raised more than $17 million in a Series C financing round led by previous investors ...   [partly] to increase Veniti's international expansion. Veniti is already commercially available in eight countries in Europe and will be available in 15 by the end of the year, Mathes said.   [Brian Feldt, St. Louis Business Journal, Mar 10, 15]

[Wisconsin]EDC certified four other companies to receive the tax credits They were: MPSP LLC, Milwaukee; HuTerra LLC, De Pere; and HealthMyne , Madison. Pegasus Sustainability Solutions , Fitchburg, was approved to receive the certification and a $125,000 loan.  WEDC also said Tuesday that it has approved low-interest loans for two other emerging companies. Xolve , Middleton, will receive a $330,000 loan; and Shamrock Energy, Neenah, will get a $150,000 loan.[Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jul 2, 13]  None had SBIR. 

HealthTell (Chandler, AZ)

the Sixth Annual Innovation Tri-Valley Forum, a gathering in Pleasanton [CA] of Lawrence Livermore and Sandia/California lab officials, medical professionals, investors and entrepreneurs who discussed ways that startups could benefit from the area's available resources. ... Betsy Cantwell, director for Economic Development at the Livermore lab. "Technology transfer has been a part of the lab's DNA for 20 years."   Cantwell said the lab has produced 20-30 regional "spinout" companies in the last decade, including HealthTell (San Ramon, CA; no SBIR) and Fathom (Oakland, CA; no SBIR) , a 3-D printing company. ...    [Sandia NL claims] Sandstone Diagnostics (Livermore, CA; no SBIR)  [Jeremy Thomas, San Jose Mercury News, Jul 24]  The big contribution from the government-funded labs is computing power.

HealthTell (Chandler, AZ; no SBIR) that spun out of Arizona State University ... raised $4M To help commercialize a new diagnostics test for lung, breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. [Hayley Ringle, Phoenix Business Journal, Aug 30, 13]

HealthTronics

HealthTronics (Austin, TX; one SBIR, founded 1985), a developer of mobile technology that zaps kidney stones and cancer tumors, has acquired United Therapies LLC (Chicago, IL; no SBIR).  ....   said the deal would broaden its national presence and includes investments in facilities that provide low-cost alternatives to hospitals.  ... In early 2014, Endo International PLC sold HealthTronics to New York-based Altaris Capital Partners LLC for $130M.  [Christopher Calnan, Austin Business Journal, Mar 9, 16]

Endo Pharmaceuticals completed its $223 million acquisition of HealthTronics (one SBIR) [Philadelphia Business Journal, Jul 15, 10]

Endo Pharmaceuticals has agreed to buy HealthTronics (Austin, TX; one SBIR in Georgia)a provider of urological products and services, for $223 million.   .... a continuation of Endo’s strategy to be a market leader in pelvic health. [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, May 3, 10]

HealthTronics said it made $31.2 million in the third quarter, down about 7%. [Austin American-Statesman, Nov 8] One 2004 lithotripsy SBIR probably made little difference in a public company with a $236M market cap.  Started life in Georgia and then merged in 2004 with Prime Medical Services.

Hearforward (Colchester,VT)

TheVermont Center for Emerging Technologies has added $1.8 million in new federal stimulus funds, boosting to $5 million the fund the quasi-public technology incubator has at its disposal ...  Returns from investments will be paid back into the 10-year fund and reinvested, [fund manager David Bradbury] said. ... has already made a handful of investments out of miscellaneous funds, including Hearforward, (Colchester, VT; no SBIR) social media analytics software company; Kilawatt Technologies (Shelburne, VT; no SBIR) energy efficiency analytics company; and SemiProbe (Colchester, VT; no SBIR) semiconductor equipment company. [Mass High Tech, Apr 21, 10]

Heartland Robotics

Heartland Robotics, the company founded by MIT robotics expert and iRobot corp. co-founder Rodney Brooks, has landed $20 million in its latest round of funding.  [Mass High Tech, Dec 2, 10]

Heartland Robotics, the manufacturing-focused robotics company founded by iRobot co-founder Rodney Brooks, has taken in $12 million from three investors, and is aggressively hiring engineers, the startup announced  [Mass High Tech, Sep 9, 09]

HeartWare International (Framingham, MA)

Medical devices company HeartWare International (no SBIR) reports it is raising approximately $55 million in a private placement of stock with a group of unnamed institutional investors in the United States, and it is considering a similar placement to Australian investors that would raise another $5 million. ... In February, HeartWare announced plans to be acquired by California medical devices company Thoratec  for $282 million. That deal was called off at the end of July, however, after the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said that Thoratec had a monopoly in the left ventricular assist device market and would allow a suit seeking a preliminary injunction to stop the deal, while the FTC looked at the sale more closely.  [Mass High Tech, Aug 11, 09]

heart pump maker HeartWare International (Framingham, MA; no SBIR) is being acquired by Thoratec (CA; two tiny SBIRs two decades ago) for $282 million  half in cash and half in shares of Thoratec common.  [Mass High Tech, Feb 13]

Heat Biologics (Chapel Hill, NC)

Heat Biologics (Durham, NC; $300K SBIR) a leader in the development of immunotherapies designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer, announced the pricing of an underwritten public offering [to raise $4M].  [company press release, Mar 23, 17]

cancer immunotherapy developer Heat Biologics (Durham, NC; $300K SBIR) used stock to acquire an 80 percent stake in Pelican Therapeutics  (Austin, TX; no SBIR), whose lead drug candidate has the potential to work in combination with Heat’s own experimental treatment. [Ben Fidler, xconomy.com, Mar 10, 17]

Heat Biologics down 72% [Dec 1, 16] researchers reported that there were encouraging signs of anti-tumor activity as HS-410 generated a robust antigen-specific immune response to multiple tumor-associated peptides in treated patients, while there were no immune responses of this type in the placebo. However, these responses did not translate into clinical outcomes, and there was no statistically significant difference in the primary endpoint (proportion of recurrence-free survival at one year) between the vaccine and placebo arms of the trial.  [company press release]

Heat Biologics up 30% [Nov 28, 16]

Heat Biologics reported that it had $7.1 million in cash as of June 30, which doesn’t include the recent infusion of $2 million. The company had $11.6 million in cash at the end of last year.  [Raleigh News & Observer, Aug 15, 16]

Heat Biologics will cut its workforce by 22 percent, cut compensation for the remaining leadership team and reduce planned enrollment for a drug trial.  [Jason deBruyn, Triangle Business Journal, Apr 7, 16]

Heat Biologics hopes to raise as much as $6.8 million through a public offering. ... shares drop 65%.  [Jason deBruyn,
Triangle Business Journal, Mar 18, 16]

drug developer Heat Biologics will look to raise $13 million from public markets, a move that will bring significant dilution to existing shareholders. Heat has 8.4 million shares outstanding and will raise the additional capital through the sale of 7.1 million new shares   [Jason deBruyn, Triangle Business Journal, Feb 19, 16]

The FDA has stopped Heat Biologics from enrolling patients in a clinical trial evaluating a treatment for bladder cancer while the company works through an issue regarding the cells used as the source for its cancer immunotherapy.  [Frank Vinluan, xconomy.com, Feb 3, 16]

Cancer drug developer Heat Biologics is looking to raise $12.5 million through a stock offering as the company continues mid-stage clinical trials for its bladder cancer immunotherapy.   [Frank Vinluan, xconomy.com, Jan 22, 16]

Heat Biologics up 18% [Jan 6, 16]

Heat Biologics up 55% [Jan 5, 16]

Heat Biologics  up 10% [Dec 21, 15]

Heat Biologics down 13%  [Nov 16, 15]

Heat Biologics up 10% [Oct 16,15]

Heat Biologics up 28% [Sep 18, 15]

Heat Biologics up 11% [Sep 4, 15]

Heat Biologics down 15% [Sep 3, 15]

Heat Biologics enrolled its first patient in a clinical trial to test a combination therapy against lung cancer.  [Jason deBruyn, Triangle Business Journal, Sep 1, 15]

Heat Biologics down 18% [Sep 1, 15]

Heat Biologics up 10% [May 21,15]

Heat Biologics up 11% [Apr 16,15]

Heat Biologics up 17% [Apr 14,15]

Heat Biologics down 11% [Mar 25,15]

Heat Biologics down 15% [Mar 10, 15]

Heat Biologics up 13% [Mar 9, 15]  FDA granted Fast Track to Heat's experimental drug named HS-410, which it hopes to market as a treatment for bladder cancer  [Jason deBruyn, Triangle Business Journal, Mar 9, 15]

Heat Biologics  up 12% [Feb 18, 15]   a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of cancer immunotherapies, and OncoSec Medical, (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) a company developing DNA-based intratumoral cancer immunotherapies, announced that they have entered into an agreement to evaluate the combination of the immunotherapy approaches developed by each company. [Heat Biologics press release, Feb 18, 15]

Heat Biologics down 11% [Feb 2, 15]

Heat Biologics  up 43% [Jan 26, 15]

Heat Biologics up 10% [Jan 8, 15] 

Heat Biologics (Chapel Hill NC; $300K SBIR, nine employees) up 20% [Dec 30, 14] 

Heat Biologics down 10% [Oct 8, 14]

drug developer Heat Biologics (Durham, NC; $300K SBIR in Florida) began dosing a Phase 2 trial to test an experimental drug in lung cancer patients. [Jason deBruyn, Triangle Business Journal, Sep 18, 14]

Heat Biologics (Chapel Hill, NC; $300K SBIR, 8 employees, IPO in 2013) reported it now has enough money to continue its drug-development efforts through at least the first quarter of 2016 after raising $7.5 million in debt financing.   ...  no products on the market but is developing drugs for bladder cancer and lung cancer.  [David Ranii, Raleigh News & Observer, Aug 25, 14] 

Heat Biologics (Chapel Hill, NC;  $300K SBIR) fell 4 percent in its first day of trading after the drug-development firm became the sixth Triangle company to go public this year. [Raleigh News & Observer, Jul 24, 13]

Heat Biologics (Chapel Hill, NC; $300K SBIR) [5-year-old developer of cancer treatments that doesn’t have any products on the market]has increased the amount it hopes to raise in an initial public offering of stock. Separately, website IPOScoop.com is anticipating that the company's IPO is two weeks away.  [David Ranii; Raleigh News & Observer, Jul 10, 13]

Heat Biologics (Chapel Hill, NC; $300K SBIR) has netted a credit facility from Square 1 Bank. Proceeds of the credit facility will be used to support ongoing clinical trials and company growth. ... aims to develop therapeutic vaccines to combat cancers and infectious diseases. [Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Dec 13, 12]

HeatGenie (Austin, TX)

Self-heating food package maker HeatGenie (Austin, TX, founded 2007 as Ironbridge Technologies; one SBIR) has received $400,000 of a planned $450,000 round of funding. ... Its business model is to generate revenue by licensing the technology to container companies and heat manufacturers  [Austin Business Journal, Jul 6, 10] got $1M from TX Emerging Tech fund

Helicos BioSciences   (Cambridge, MA)

Beleaguered Helicos BioSciences reports it has cut staff levels in half, eliminating 40 positions in the first quarter of the year. The cuts are part of a shift in company focus to concentrating on the diagnostics market for its gene sequencing technology.  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, May 18, 10]

Companies to Watch in personalized medicine. Affymetrix, Life Tech, Illumina, Helicos Biosciences, Metabolon.  Among the fifty most innovative:  A123 Systems, American Superconductor, Alnylam, Illumina, iRobot, Novomer, BIND Biosciences.  [MIT Tech Review, M/A10]

Helicos BioSciences  has taken itself off the auction block, the genetic analysis instrument company said  [AP, Nov 11, 09]

Helicos BioSciences said it received a $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Human Genome Research Institute. ... part of the company's genome sequencing technology program. [Boston Globe, Oct 9, 09]

Helicos BioSciencessaid that it has entered into an agreement with certain investors to raise about $18.6 million in a private placement through the sale of shares of its common stock and warrants. ... focused on innovative genetic analysis technologies for the research, drug discovery, and diagnostic markets.  [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Dec 20]

Helicos up 19% [Jan 10, 08]

Helicos BioSciences (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR)  a developer of genetic analysis systems, has formed a collaboration with a University of Massachusetts Medical School researcher to advance technology for studying RNA... a 2006 net loss of $20.6M on revenue of $160,000. The firm employs 79 workers.  [Mass High Tech, Jan 9, 08] Raised $40M VC Mar 06 and $45M by IPO May 07.

Helion Energy (Redmond, WA)

Startups trying fusion energy.  Jeffrey P. Bezos, founder of Amazon.com has invested in General Fusion, a start-up in British Columbia.  ...   Paul Allen, a co-founder of Microsoft, is betting on another fusion company, Tri Alpha Energy  (Foothill Ranch, CA; no SBIR) ...  Peter Thiel — the co-founder of PayPal, has invested in Helion Energy (Redmond, WA; no SBIR) [ DINO GRANDONI, New York Times, Oct 25, 15] Helion also has $5M from DOE. [company website] TriAlpha has raised tens of millions of dollars from private investors who range from some of Silicon Valley’s foremost venture capitalists to Hollywood actor Harry Hamlin. [Orange County Register, Sep 8, 15]

Helion Energy (Redmond, WA; no SBIR) raised $10.6 million to develop technology that aims to create a fusion reactor to generate power.  ...  plans to raise more than $21 million total in the continuing round.  ...  had previously received $5 million from the U.S. Department of Energy and raised a $1.5 million round in August 2014  ...  creating technology it calls “The Fusion Engine,” which would use helium from engine exhaust, according to the company’s website. The helium, along with deuterium fuel from seawater, would be heated to become plasma and then compressed with magnetic fields to reach fusion temperature, which is more than 100 million degrees.  ...  Many believe the world is at least decades away from fusion power, but Helion Energy executives have said the company could build a useful reactor in the next three years.   [Rachel Lerman, Seattle Times, Jul 7, 15]

Helion Energy  (Redmond, WA;  no SBIR) working on the illusive challenge of fusion energy, announced a $1.5 million investment from Mithril, the investment firm. The company is working on what it says is a technology capable of producing cheap, clean electricity by using electromagets to compress deuterium to ridiculously high temperatures and pressures. The deuterium “fuses and the expanding particle energy is directly converted to electricity, pulsing once per second,” the company says in a news release.   ....  has previously attracted a $5 million Department of Energy grant to prove its technology at a small scale.  [Benjamin Romano, xconomy.com, Aug 15,  14]    has licensed the IPA fusion technology from MSNW LLC (Redmond, WA; no SBIR) which has the same executives as Helion [MSNW website]

Heliovolt (Austin TX)

HelioVolt (Austin, TX; one SBIR) is suspending manufacturing operations and plans to lay off employees after a major investor pulled its support, company officials said ...   makes thin-film solar products that can be incorporated into building materials, employs just under 100 people locally, company officials said.  ...    had raised $233 million to fund its move to volume production and international expansion, including more than $80 million from SK Group, whose holdings include South Korea’s largest refiner. ... awarded up to $1 million from the state-administered Texas Enterprise Fund in 2008, with the governor’s office at the time saying the plant would create nearly 160 jobs and $62 million in capital investment.  [Brian Garr, Austin American Statesman, Feb 24, 14]

solar energy company HelioVolt (Austin, TX; one SBIR) is continuing to lay the groundwork for a commercial expansion with another investment from a South Korean conglomerate.  SK Group, whose holdings include South Korea’s largest refiner, has invested another $9.5 million in HelioVolt, bringing its total recent investment in the company to $19 million. [Brian Gaar, Austin American Statesman, Aug 4, 13]

HelioVolt (Austin, TX; one SBIR) has raised $9.5 million of planned $19 million financing. [Christopher Calnan, Austim Amrican Statesman, Jul 5, 13]

Nanosolar(Silicon Valley, CA; $1.9M SBIR) [ambitious CIGS solar startup] laid off part of its staff and is now in a “quiet period,” according to a company representative. Two reports suggest the cuts were significant, as much as 75 percent of the staff. ...  raised more than $450 million from venture investors  ....Another Silicon Valley CIGS startup, Miasole  (no SBIR), last year was acquired at a great loss to investors to Chinese energy project developer, Hanergy Holdings, which also acquired CIGS startup Solibro from QCells in Germany.  Heliovolt (Austin, TX; one SBIR) attracted funding from SK Innovations in Korea to fund its initial production and Stion has also forged deals with Asian manufacturers. These deals suggest that the CIGS technology is still viable, even if the company ownership has changed.    [Martin LaMonica, MIT Technology Review.com, Feb 19, 13]  Difficult technoology losing out to falling solar market prices.

HelioVolt (Austin, TX; one SBIR) has raised additional funds to support its solar power module business, according to regulatory documents. The 11-year-old company reported this week that it has raised an additional $12.2 million in debt securities, which include a right to acquire stock in the future. [Kirk Ladendorf, Austin American Statesman, Dec 14, 12]

HelioVolt (Austin, TX; one SBIR) has raised $8.5 million through the sale of debt securities, in what the company described as "internal financing" to support its operations. [Austin American Statesman, Jan 28, 11]

HelioVolt, a producer of highly-efficient thin film solar products, received a Printed Electronics USA 2007 Award from IDTechEx, a leading independent international consulting firm specializing in printed electronics, RFID and smart packaging. [company press release, Nov 15]

HelioVolt (Austin, TX; one Phase 1 SBIR) has attracted $24M in private investment as it gets ready to build a factory to make advanced solar power panels using thin films of advanced materials. The new money comes in addition to the $77M the company said it raised in August ... has raised a total of $109 M in outside capital. [Austin American-Statesman, Oct 22]

Powered by $77 M in new investment, startup Heliovolt (Austin, TX: one SBIR), will build a factory next year for mass-producing a new type of solar cell [micrometers-thick layer of a copper-indium-gallium selenide (CIGS) semiconductor]  that could, in much of the United States, make solar electricity as cheap as electricity from the grid. [Kevin Bullis, MIT Tech Review, Sep 12, 07]

The 2006 WSJ Silver Medal for Technology Innovation went to HelioVolt (Austin TX) for the fastest and most effective way to manufacture CIS (Copper Indium Selenide), the most reliable and best-performing thin film [photovoltaic] material. One SBIR (Phase I so far from MDA) perhaps created by Ron Gale. VP for Business Development and formerly Chief Technical Officer for Kopin.

Helius Medical Technologies (Newtown, PA)

Helius Medical Technologies  (Newtown, PA; no SBIR) working on non-invasive technology to enhance the brain’s ability to heal itself has raised $2 million through a combination debt and equity financing, ...  is developing what it calls a Portable Neuromodulation Stimulation (PoNS) device [that] provides therapy that uses “intraoral cutaneous stimulation,” along with cognitive exercises, to improve the brain’s ability to rehabilitate itself and compensate for symptoms caused by disease or trauma. The device delivers the external electrical stimulation to the brain through the tongue.  ...  raised more than $4 million through a series of equity financings   [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Oct 27, 15]  Here's a case of the tongue wagging the brain, a reverse of the usual brain driving the tongue, although many people have been accused of waggging tongue without engaging brain.

Helius Medical Technologies (Newtown, PA;  no SBIR) plans to use the proceeds for the stock sale to conduct clinical testing of the non-invasive technology it is developing to amplify the brain’s ability to heal itself. ... lead product candidate is the Portable Neuromodulation Stimulation device. ... provides therapy that uses “intraoral cutaneous stimulation” along with cognitive exercises to improve the brain’s ability to rehabilitate and compensate for symptoms caused by disease or trauma. [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, May 21, 15]

Helix Therapeutics (New Haven, CT)

In all, 52 venture capital deals were struck in Connecticut in 2010, with more than $187 million invested, compared with 39 deals and $157.4 million invested in 2009.  In the recent quarter, Helix Therapeutics (New Haven, CT; one SBIR) biopharmaceutical company, received $2.5 million; SeeClickFix (New Haven) firm that develops online and mobile platforms, received $1.3 million; and Affinimark Technologies (New Haven, CT; no SBIR) start-up that develops medical diagnostic products, received more than $1.2 million.  A Guilford-based online advertising start-up, uKnow, received $453,000; Interactive Mobile @dvertising LLC in Norwalk received $275,000; Retail Optimization , a New Haven firm that develops merchandising software, received $250,000; Twigtek Inc., a New Haven company that operates a website for selling or recycling used electronic equipment, also received $250,000. And Semantifi Inc., a Stamford software firm, received $50,000 from Connecticut Innovations Inc., the state's venture capital investing arm.  [Janice Podsada, Hartford Courant, Jan 21, 11]

Helix Therapeutics (New Haven, CT; one SBIR) biopharmaceutical company, has landed $2.5 million in new funding from venture firm Canaan Partners and the quasi-public state funding entity Connecticut Innovations.  ...  to move forward its proprietary targeted gene modification (TGM) technology platform, which the company says can correct certain genetic mutations in blood stem cells of patients with rare genetic diseases such as sickle cell anemia, B-Thalassemia and lysosomal storage disorders.  ...  developed at, and is licensed from, the Yale University School of Medicine. It, uses patented oligonucleotides that bind to the human genome resulting in permanent gene modification.  In January, Helix took in $500,000 in seed funding from CI  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Nov 22, 10]

Helomics (Pittsburgh, PA)

The recapitalization of Precision Therapeutics (Pittsburgh, PA; no SBIR, founded 1995) that transformed the life sciences company into Helomics caps a 20-year saga that illustrates just about every fundraising vehicle deployed in the region.  Starting with high-net-worth individuals, the company landed a who's who of Pittsburgh business funders ... That gave way to venture capital rounds, led at first by local firms and then some of the largest national institutional investors.  [Patty Tascarella,  Pittsburgh Business Times, Nov 21, 14]   dedicated to personalized cancer care. Precision offers a portfolio of products developed to help guide physicians and patients with difficult clinical decisions throughout the cancer care continuum. ... first commercial test, ChemoFx®, is a proprietary chemoresponse marker which helps improve patient outcomes by supporting physicians in the selection of effective treatments for women with gynecologic cancer. [company website]  

Hemadvance (St. Louis, MO)

Arch Grants, a linchpin of the St. Louis innovation community, has awarded 11 new startup companies from around the world with $50,000 non-equity grants. Six of the 11 startups were lured to St. Louis because of Arch Grants, which to date has invested $3.8 million into 76 companies. About half of Arch Grants’ portfolio was founded outside of St. Louis.  ... Two are SBIR candidates (risky tech, high payoff) for which $50K is peanuts:  Arch Innotek (St. Louis, MO; no SBIR) is developing technology to produce natural carotenoids by a lost cost fermentation-based process.  Hemadvance (St. Louis, MO; no SBIR) is developing next generation bio-therapeutic molecules to diagnose, manage and treat the onset and progression of coagulation disorders. [Brian Feldt, St. Louis Business Journal, Nov 12, 15] The rest are business risk stuff that should not be a target for a free-market government.

Hemarrest (Edina,MN)

Medafor (Brooklyn Center, MN; no SBIR)  says a shareholder’s startup is infringing on its patent for a blood-clotting powder that it sells.  In a federal lawsuit filed last week,  Inc. accused  Hemostasis (White Bear Lake, MN; no SBIR) of marketing a similar product that stops bleeding.  ....   Medafor acquired the patent from HemArrest (Edina, MN; no SBIR) in 2011, which joined Medafor in the lawsuit because it still has a security interest in the patent.  [Jim Hammerand, Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, Sep 27, 12]

HemaQuest Pharmaceuticals (Newton, MA)

HemaQuest Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) said it raised $13 million in an extension of its Series B funding round to support a mid-stage trial of its experimental drug for patients with sickle cell disease.  [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Mar 16, 12]

small molecule therapeutics startup Hemaquest Pharmaceuticals (Newton, MA; no SBIR)  pulled in $12 million in a Series B funding round ... develops small molecule therapeutics based on its short chain fatty acid derivative technologies to treat anemias and other blood disorders   [Mass High Tech, Apr 21, 10]

HemaQuest Pharmaceuticals (Seattle, WA; no SBIR) has raised $6 million in equity financing out of a round that could be worth as much as $12.7 million, according to a regulatory filing. ... led by former Xcyte Therapies ($1.3M SBIR) CEO Ron Berenson, is pursuing a new treatment for sickle cell anemia. [xconomy.com/seattle, Feb 4, 10]

HemaQuest Pharmaceuticals, a year-old Boston company focused on developing new treatments for blood diseases, said today that its HQK-1001 drug candidate has won orphan drug status from the FDA. [Boston Globe, Nov 5, 08]

Lilly Ventures of Indianapolis, the venture capital arm of Eli Lilly and Co., is giving $20M financing to HemaQuest Pharmaceuticals, [newly launched by two Boston University researchers] in Newton, Mass., that's developing small molecule therapeutics to treat blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia. [Indianapolis Star, Nov 3, 07]  Mass High Tech reports that part of the money came from De Novo Ventures, a California investment group, and Forward Ventures, of San Diego.

Hemera Biosciences (Boston,MA)

Hemera Biosciences, (Boston, MA; no SBIR) start-up company that’s working on a treatment for age-related blindness, has raised $3.8 million in investment funding to further study its gene remedy for the affliction. Age-related macular degeneration typically affects people over age 55 and is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and Europe, the company said.  [Beth Healy, Boston Globe, Mar 20, 13]

Hemispherx Biopharma (Philadelphia, PA)

Hemispherx Biopharma (Philadelphia, PA; no SBIR) announced  that it has entered into a Clinical Trial, Sales, Marketing, Distribution, and Supply Agreement with Scientific Products Pharmaceutical Co. LTD (SCIEN) located in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The contract covers Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain, thus expanding Hemispherx Early Access Programs (EAP) globally. The agreement also calls for SCIEN to purchase certain quantities of Hemispherx's clinical grade interferon alfa-n3 for investigative use in individuals who are exposed to and show early onset symptoms of the coronavirus that causes MERS. MERS was first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012, and can cause severe acute respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough, and shortness of breath as well as death [company press release, Apr 4, 16]

HemoGenyx (Buffalo, NY)

biotech HemoGenyx (Buffalo, NY with research in Brooklyn, NY;  SBIR) which moved to Buffalo in 2015 after raising winning a $250,000 in the first 43North competition –  recently pulled in a $1 million seed round from a  private [angel] investor.   [Dan Miner, Buffalo Business First, Jun 29, 16]   developing a new treatment for blood diseases, such as leukemia, lymphoma and bone marrow (“BM”) failure. The Company leverages a special class of cells that can generate cancer-free, patient-matched blood stem cells. These cancer-free cells can then be used in BM and blood (hematopoietic) stem cell (“HSC”) transplants, which will improve the efficacy of BM/HSC transplants and make BM/HSC transplants a viable treatment option for many patients that wouldn’t otherwise be able to find a matching donor.​  [company website]

More Buffalo subsidyHemoGenyx (Buffalo, NY; no SBIR), founded in Manhattan, is developing a new treatment for blood diseases. It expects to create seven new jobs.[Dan Miner,  Buffalo Business First, Jan 28, 15] developing a revolutionary new treatment for blood diseases, such as leukemia and lymphoma. We leverage a special class of cells, which can generate cancer-free blood stem cells. Our therapy will dramatically increase the efficacy of bone marrow transplants and eliminate the need for donors.  [company website]

HemoSonics (Charlottesville, VA)

The Stago group (France) announced  that it has completed the acquisition of HemoSonics LLC (Charlottesville, VA; $700K SBIR), a company specialized in the development of innovative Point-of-Care testing solutions... With the acquisition of the patented SEER technology (Sonic Estimation of Elasticity via Resonance) and its associated QuantraTM Hemostasis Analyzer, Stago demonstrates its willingness to develop a Point-of-Care offering to complete its leadership in Haemostasis testing and beyond.  [Stago press release, May 30, 17]   HemoSonics has been awarded more than $8 million in grants from the [several, mostly USG] institutions  [HemoSonics website]

Hemostasis (White Bear Lake, MN)

Medafor (Brooklyn Center, MN; no SBIR)  says a shareholder’s startup is infringing on its patent for a blood-clotting powder that it sells.  In a federal lawsuit filed last week,  Inc. accused  Hemostasis (White Bear Lake, MN; no SBIR) of marketing a similar product that stops bleeding.  ....   Medafor acquired the patent from HemArrest (Edina, MN; no SBIR) in 2011, which joined Medafor in the lawsuit because it still has a security interest in the patent.  [Jim Hammerand, Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, Sep 27, 12]

Hennepin Life Sciences

Biotech startup Hennepin Life Sciences spun out of U of Minnesota raises $1.9M  [from] angel investors   [Katharine Grayson, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Mar 7, 17]  has completed preclinical development and is entering a Phase II clinical trial for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. HLS also has several antimicrobial technologies that are currently being prepared to enter the clinical phase of development for the treatment of infections in humans including vaginal candidiasis, urinary tract infections and skin and soft tissue infections. [company website]

Hepregen (Winchester, MA)

Hepregen (Medford, MA; one SBIR) won a $500,000 Phase 2 SBIR [NSF] grant contributing to the company’s total $2 million in federal funding. ... developing a platform to reduce the liver toxicity caused by approved drugs.... co-founded in 2007  [Mass High Tech, Jan 14, 10]  spun out Hepregen Corporation from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), with a commitment of a $5-million Series A investment [company website, Feb 09]  The new technology—that Bhatia and HST postdoctoral associate Salman Khetani describe in the Nov. 18 online issue of Nature Biotechnology—arranges human liver cells into tiny colonies only 500 micrometers in diameter that act much like a real liver and reportedly survive as long as six weeks.  To predict how close their model tissue comes to real liver tissue, the researchers evaluated gene expression profiles and found that these profiles are very similar to those of fresh liver cells, “giving us confidence that other [liver] functions are preserved,” Khetani says.  For drug testing purposes, this allows each colony to provide a view into human liver response to a drug without requiring human exposure to the drug in a clinical trial, explains Bhatia. [Jeffrey Bouley, Drug Discovery News, Jan 08]

Hepregen (Winchester, MA; no SBIR) raised a $3 million tranche of a Series A financing of $5 million, according to online reports. The -based firm is a spinout of MIT and is developing a platform to reduce the liver toxicity caused by approved drugs. The platform is based on technology developed by Sangeeta Bhatia, an associate professor in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The technology is based on engineered “miniature micro liver cells.”  [Mass High Tech, Sep 2, 08]

Heraeus Medical Components (White Bear Township, MN)

Meanwhile, subsdies in Minnesota. The state of Minnesota approved its first five grants worth $2.27 million to manufacturers as part of the new, $24 million Job Creation Fund. The fund hopes to attract scores of companies to Minnesota and to encourage firms here to stay and expand in the state. ...  So far, the state has approved grants to Axis Clinicals (Dilworth, MN; no SBIR) ($779,988) an India-based clinical-trials laboratory that decided to open a new $12 million facility in Dilworth with 100 employees. , Heraeus Medical Components (White Bear Township, MN; no SBIR) ($498,100) Heraeus Medical is expected to add 55 workers. It plans to spend $7.8 million to renovate its existing plant,  Bluegrass Proteins (Dawson, MN; no SBIR) ($650,000) Kentucky-based Bluegrass Proteins will bring 56 jobs, plans to invest $18.2 million to buy and retrofit the Associated Milk Producers’ raw milk plant,  Harmony Enterprises(Harmony, MN; no SBIR) ($215,000),  and Valmont Industries(Farmington, MN; no SBIR) ($129,000).  an aluminum pole maker with operations in Minnesota, Indiana and Canada... makes waste compactors and recycling balers. Its plans include 14 new hires and a $1.1 million plant expansion.  will add 15 workers.  Combined, the five companies plan to add 240 jobs in Minnesota. [Dee DePass, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Apr 1, 14]

Herley Industries

Herley Industries dropped 13% [Jun 27, 07] after DOD suspended two of its plants from new government contracts.

Herley Industries rose 20% on news of DOD's lifting its ban on new contract awards at some of its manufacturing sites. [Oct 13, 06]

Herley led the market slide with a 34% one-day loss Tues Jun 13 after the DOD suspended procurement from Herley's factories amid the mess that includes indictment of the former Chairman.

Too Much Profit. Shares of Herley Industries were halted for trading this afternoon after the U.S. Attorney's office for eastern Pennsylvania indicted the company and Chairman Lee Blatt for alleged excessive profits on three defense contracts. .. designs and manufactures microwave devices for use in high-technology defense electronics [Dow Jones Newswire, Jun 6] No SBA recorded SBIRs.

Hermes Biosciences (Cambridge, MA)

Merrimack Pharmaceuticals (Cambridge, MA; $1M SBIR), which is developing treatments for cancer and autoimmune disease, said it bought Hermes Biosciences (South San Francisco, CA; $600K SBIR) for an undisclosed sum. [Robert Wesiman, Boston Globe, Dec 8, 09]

HexaTech (Raleigh, NC)

HexaTech (Morrisville, NC; $1.5M SBIR  landed $2.2 million in federal dollars from the U.S. Department of Energy ARPA [to]  fund development of new power semiconductor technology for the modernization of electrical power grids.  ....  has secured more than $14 million in financial support from the likes of Durham-based Intersouth Partners and grants from the Defense DARPA – and isn’t just creating grid technology. HexaTech is also developing LEDs that can generate such intense light that they can deactivate bacteria and viruses in water.  [Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Dec 13, 12]

Having already raised more than $14 million in three previous funding rounds, leaders at HexaTech (Raleigh, NC; $1.5M SBIR)  now are looking to land another $3 million from investors.  The 10-year-old N.C. State semiconductor spinoff, which currently employs about 25 people, would use part of the money to add another 10 to 15 employees by year end. It’s all part of HexaTech’s goal to execute an ambitious plan — be like Cree  [Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, May 25, 12]

Hexfuel (Hastings, MN)

startup HexFuel (Maplewood, MN;  SBIR) will get $740,000 in public funding for a new Hastings plant that will have up to 300 workers.  ...   HexFuel is investing $10 million in the plant, DEED said.   [Jim Hammerand, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Apr 3, 14] 

Startup manufacturer Hexfuel (Hastings, MN; no SBIR) plans to add 150 to 300 employees over the next five years  ....  makes the Boostbox, which it says improves cleanliness and performance of diesel engines by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen molecules and feeding the gasses into the engine.  .... Hexfuel is seeking between $500,000 and $1.5 million in subsidies through the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development   [Sam Black, Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, Feb 10, 14]  A chemical engineer asks where any better fuel efficiency will come from, considering how much energy it takes to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen whose combination makes one of the most powerful combustions. Some of the energy will be recovered in the engine's combustion, but the nasty side of thermodynamics says that the round trip will cost a lot of net energy.

Hibernaid (Troy, NY)

Hibernaid, (Troy, NY; no SBIR)  drug-discovery company, was named “most likely to be funded.” ... at the 10th Annual SmartStart UNYTECH Venture Forum .... The three-person firm has created a drug to induce hypothermia, a treatment used to treat post cardiac arrest patients, as well as people who have suffered strokes or traumatic brain injuries. [Business Review (Albany), May 19, 10]

High Impact Environmental (Church Hill, MD)

Fifteen university research teams from Maryland will receive a total of $4.1 million to work with local companies to turn their research into products that could one day be sold on the commercial market.  .... MIPS will contribute $1.8 million and private companies will contribute $2.8 million. The companies:  A&G Pharmaceutical (Columbia, MD; no SBIR),  Rehabtics LLC (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR)  High Impact Environmental (Church Hill, MD; no SBIR),  Birich Technologies (Towson, MD; no SBIR), Earth Networks (Germantown, MD; no SBIR), Fiberight (Halethorpe, MD; no SBIR), CoolCAD Electronics (College Park,MD $1.6M SBIR), XChanger Companies (Annapolis, MD; no SBIR), Remedium Technologies (College Park, MD; no SBIR), Pothole Pros LLC (Waldorf, MD; no SBIR), Hoopers Island Oyster Aquaculture (Fishers Creek, MD; no SBIR),  Metompkin Seafood (Crisfield, MD; no SBIR) GreatGrow Maryland LLC (Rock Hall, MD; no  SBIR), vCalc (Hagerstown, MD;  SBIR), Shore Thing Shellfish (Tall Timbers, MD; no SBIR). ($114,094)  [Sarah Gantz,  Baltimore Business Journal, Feb 26, 14] 

High Performance Technologies (Reston, VA

Dynamics Research Corp. (DRC) is spending $143 million to acquire High Performance Technologies (Reston, VA; $900K SBIR) a provider of high-end tech services for military and federal health-care markets.  .. HPTi has 440 workers .... In March, DRC won a share of a $4 billion contract with the Internal Revenue Service. [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Jun 6, 11]

High Point Pharmaceuticals (High Point, NC)

A new licensing agreement by TransTech Pharma (High Point, NC; $1.8M SBIR) for one of its cancer treatment programs could mean an infusion of more than $100 million. ...  TransTech Pharma and High Point Pharmaceuticals (no SBIR), the sister company spun off from TransTech in 2008, will partner with Calithera Biosciences, a San Francisco-area clinical stage pharmaceutical company, under the new agreement.  ...  Along with an initial license fee of $600,000 from Calithera, the High Point companies will receive up to $30.5 million for the first licensed product generated by their research and up to $77 million in sales-based milestones and royalty payments once the product hits the market  [Owen Covington, Triad Business Journal, Mar 6, 15]

Histogen (San Diego, CA)

Venture Capital investments in San Diego 3Q2016.    Ostendo Technologies (Carlsbad, CA; one SBIR)  $42 million;  Tealium ( San Diego; no SBIR)  $35 million ; Singlera Genomics   (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) $20 million;  Avelas Biosciences     (San Diego, CA; no SBIR)  $20 million ;  Fortis Therapeutics     (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) $18 million ; Histogen   (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) $16 million ; Medsphere Systems  (Carlsbad, CA; no SBIR) $15 million;  CellSavers  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) $15 million;  Progenity  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) $12 million; AristaMD  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR)  $11 million.   [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Oct 11, 16] 

Histogen  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR, founded 2007, a regenerative medicine company, says it has partnered with a group of medical device investors to establish a joint venture, PUR Biologics, to adapt its expertise in fibroblasts, the cells that form connective tissue, for use in orthopedics. [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Mar 11, 13]

Histogenics (Waltham,MA)

Histogenics (Waltham, MA: no SBIR, 41 employees) raised $65 million in its IPO ...  developing a cartilage-replacement technique intended as an alternative to total knee replacement  ...  has a regenerative therapy in Phase 3 trials called Neocart designed to regrow knee cartilage before osteoarthritis sets in.   [Don Seiffert, Boston Business Journal, Dec 4, 14] 

Histogenics (Waltham, MA; no SBIR) a regenerative-medicine company has raised $49 million to test an implant that could help the [cartilage] healing process.  ... to file for U.S. regulatory approval of its treatment for cartilage lesions in the knee sometime in late 2014. The company also is working to gain clearance in Europe for a collagen scaffold designed to be used with a patient's own stem cells to repair small cartilage defects.  [Wall Street Journal, Jul 31, 12]

Histogenics (Waltham, MA; no SBIR) a regenerative medicine company , announced the completion of a $49 million round of financing. ... to complete the ongoing Phase 3 clinical program of its lead product candidate --- NeoCart. According to Histogenics, NeoCart is an autologous neocartilage tissue implant that utilizes a patient’s own cells to regenerate cartilage in patients suffering from cartilage lesions in the knee. [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Jul 24, 12]

Cartilage regeneration company Histogenics (Waltham, MA; no SBIR)  announced its closing of a $9 million Series B round of funding. ...  will support development of the company’s NeoCart neocartilage implant, currently in Phase 2 clinical trials, and VeriCart auto-regenerative cartilage matrix, scheduled for Phase 2 clinical trials in 2008. [Mass High Tech, Sep 3, 08]

HistoRx (New Haven, CT)

>Connecticut Innovations has announced a $1.5 million loan to HistoRx (New Haven, CT; one SBIR) working on diagnostic solutions for cancer treatment. [Mass High Tech, Mar 15, 10]

HistoSonics (Ann Arbor, MI)

HistoSonics (Ann Arbor, MI;  SBIR, founded 2010), the UMichigan medical device spinout has a new focus on the treatment of solid-tumor cancers. Last month, also closed on a $8.2 million Series B round.  ... [new CEO] Gibbons says HistoSonics’s therapy holds promise because it’s noninvasive, doesn’t require needles or incisions, and is precise.   [Sarah Schmid Stevenson, xconomy.com, Apr 24, 17]

Hittite Microwave

Analog Devices CEO Vincent Roche said that the company could grow its recently acquired business, Hittite Microwave, to a $1 billion company in the "not too distant future."   [Sara Castellanos, Boston Business Journal, Aug 27, 14]

Hittite Microwave (Chelmsford, MA; $27M SBIR over 25 years)  up 29% [Jun 9, 14]   Analog Devices announced that it will acquire [Hittite] for approximately $2.5 billion in cash.[David Harris, Boston Business Journal, Jun 9]  If SBIR were a serious investment program, instead of a political handout, it would know its ROI. On a simplistic guess that the SBIR was 5% of the total capital investment in Hittite, the government would get about $125M of the cash, about five times its investment. But the gov doesn't do that because the politicians would be embarrassed by the negative total return.

Hittite Microwave  up 10% [Nov 30, 11]

Hittite Microwave (Chelmsford, MA; $28M SBIR)  a maker of analog and mixed-signal semiconductors ... [a] core holdings of the two top-performing U.S.-stock mutual funds over the 12 months through September ...  McDowell expects Hittite's part of the semiconductor business, which is less commoditized than the digital semiconductor industry, to continue to grow and for Hittite to boost its earnings by about 20% a year over the next three years as it benefits from a debt-free balance sheet and new products. ....  Over the past few years, it has been one of the most profitable semiconductor investments the fund has seen, says Mr. Beiley [Suzanne McGee, Wall Street Journal, Oct 5, 11]

Hittite Microwave (Chelmsford, MA; $28M SBIR) maker of chips for use in radio frequency, microwave and millimeter wave devices, has acquired Norway’s Arctic Silicon Devices (Trondheim, at 63.5 degrees latitude, north of even Fairbanks AK) for about $12 million in cash and equity. [Mass High Tech, Jan 19, 11]   350 employees, up from one in 1985 at first SBIR.

Real efficiency. NVE is the 4th most efficient company in [Technology stocks]. .. earnings per employee was $230,210 for the last 12 months. That's profits! Hittite Microwave  the 9th most efficient [with] earnings per employee was $140,570 for the last 12 months. [China Analyst, Feb 19 10]  Thanks to Jeff Bond for the info.

Forbes's 2009 list of best 200 small companies includes Aerovironment, American Science and Engineering (paying a dividend and with nearly $600M market cap), Argon ST, Hittite Microwave, II-IV, Meridian Bioscience, Neogen, NVE, and Synaptics

Hittite Microwave is down 16%, half as much as the broad market, since I recommended the stock in August 2006. The “fabless” chip maker — one that designs chips but doesn’t fabricate them — has maintained high profitability, and while its recent sales growth might be difficult to sustain, the company looks likely to take share from struggling, capital-intensive peers.  [Jack HOugh, Smart Money, Mar 24, 09]

Hittite Microwave up 11% [Oct 24, 08]

Hittite Microwave down 10% [Oct 14, 08]

Forbes 200 Best Small Companies list for 2008 had several "SBIR involved" companies: Hittite Microwave 12, II-IV 23, Synaptics 33, NVE 39, ATMI 114, Cymer 166. 

Hittite Microwave founder has led a Series B round of financing for Cambridge drug developer Syndexa Pharmaceuticals(no SBIR), Syndexa reports. Yalcin Ayasli, a founder and former executive and board member at Chelmsford-based Hittite, was the lead investor in the $15 million round of private capital. ... Syndexa was founded by scientists from Harvard University and the University of California San Diego. The firm said it has raised a total of $19 million in private equity.  [Mass High Tech, May 30]

Hittite Microwave up 10% [Mar 20, 08]

Hittite Microwave down 12% [Feb 15, 08]

Hittite Microwave up 12% [Oct 26, 07]

Hittite Microwave has an agreement to license a line of integrated circuit technology from aerospace and defense contractor Northrop Grumman. [Mass High Tech, Oct 19]

Smart Money picked Hittite Microwave as a company doing well in the shade where Wall Street analysts don't follow.

Hittite Microwave jumped 15% after it said it expects earnings to grow 27 -34 % in the first quarter on higher sales. 

Good Profit, Bad Forecast for Hittite Microwave whacked the stock 15% [Oct 27, 06] as the price dropped off its heretofore steady rise to double its starting price a year ago. Hittite had at least 24 Phase 2 SBIRs before being publicly traded.

HJM Precision (Troy, NY)

HJM Precision (Troy, NY; no SBIR, 107 years old, 38 employees) which designs, builds and services automation equipment for medical and manufacturing companies, will expand its manufacturing space next year. ...  driven by growth in all four areas of the business," said Jim Magee, president  .... added 12,800 square feet to its factory two years ago to make room for its acquisition of Geier & Bluhm, a manufacturer of precise measuring instruments used in the construction and aerospace industries.  [Krystle S. Morey, Albany Business Review, Jul 11, 14]

HNC Software (San Diego, CA)

HNC Bought HNC Software which had some help from SBIR in its younger days will be bought up by consumer credit scoring firm Fair, Isaac for $726M in stock. Fair Isaac says its to give them a better way to find and keep customers.

HNC Software , whose backers include the DARPA, reckons that its new approach to neural networks based on a cluster of 30 Pentium processors is the most powerful and promising approach to artificial intelligence ever discovered. HNC claims that its system could be used to spot camouflaged vehicles on a battlefield or extract a voice signal from a noisy background—tasks humans can do well, but computers cannot. Whether or not its technology lives up to the claims made for it, that HNC is emphasising the use of AI is itself an interesting development. [The Economist, Mar 16]

HNC Software reported earnings. Pro Forma (which means whatever we say it means) profit was seven cents a share. Actual Consolidated Results (which means what the accounting standards require) was a loss of 23 cents a share. The company blamed a continued slowdown in IT spending both in the US and overseas and gave thanks for a flexible business model that allows businesses to opt for payment on either a 'pay-as-you-go' or a one-time 'up-front' model.

A Wall Street Journal piece on passenger profiling says HNC Software is racing to develop an algorithm-based program for the airlines that factors such data as ethnicity, age and travel history into an equation aimed at calculating the probability of a passenger being a terrorist. HNC currently sells risk-assessment tools to insurers and lenders. SBIR gave HNC a little help while it funded lots of neural network companies who never made it public. Since neural nets are a nice clean business, there is no shortage of talent wanting government money to pursue the hobby. SBA reports 857 NN SBIR awards for neural network, of which about half won Phase 2. At an average of only $500K per Phase 2 for 400 awards, that's $200M into an industry out of which only one company went public.HNC had about $5M (2%) of that total. But neural nets is a competitive business and like most competitive industries, you gotta have something better than being good at government R&D to make a business success.

HNC Software , best known for products that help catch credit-card and insurance fraud, said it was developing a program for airlines that would sweep through reservation records for suspicious patterns and help flag potential hijackers. ... developing the software with privately-held PROS Revenue Management which manages revenue systems for major airlines,John Mutch, chief executive of HNC, said he expected the new security software would be delivered within six months. ... ``We will be able to detect patterns -- for instance, if five people of the same origin are traveling together and may use a certain kind of payment, fall between the ages of 25 and 40, and had previously limited credit history,'' Mutch said. The program would deliver a real-time scorecard to airlines, with a range of one to 1,000, which would alert airline personnel of the potential need to increase security. ... Previous suggestions to use data-mining software to sift through corporate records have drawn opposition from civil rights advocates. ...HNC has seen business slow and said it expects third quarter earnings and sales of $58-59M and operating earnings per share 13-15 cents. [Sue Zeidler, Arizona Republic, Oct. 04]

HNC Software took a 9% hit despite a favorable mention by NICK WINGFIELD, Wall Street Journal (Sep 26) of being best known for providing sophisticated software that helps the credit-card and insurance industries detect fraud by monitoring for activity that matches profiles of suspicious behavior. Following the terrorist attacks, the company has been discussing ways of using the technology to identify "high-risk passengers" with a company that installs information systems for airlines, said Joseph Sirosh, an executive director at HNC. Mr. Sirosh said executives at the company had authorized him to look at the company's entire portfolio of products to adapt them for counterterrorism measures. And just a month before the events of Sept. 11, HNC signed a three-year contract with the Defense Department to develop software that could help health-care workers more quickly identify outbreaks resulting from biological terrorism by detecting patterns within bacterial DNA.

In the latest news from HNC Software, the CFO sold 10000 shares. That makes all sales and no buying by insiders for the last year. Lots of options have been exercised at prices above today's prices.

No HNC Didn't Collapse. The apparent cratering of HNC Software, a 75% decline Monday, didn't end the world. Although one brokerage firm reduced its recommendation, the main thrust of the decvline was a distribution of HNC's shares of Retek.How much the distribution actually lowered HNC's share price needs some careful calcualtion.

HNC Acquires Another (Sep 21) HNC Software (San Diego, CA) announced plans yesterday to acquire Open Solutions, a Connecticut company that makes software to process loans, deposits and other transactions for small banks. Open Solutions' shareholders will receive 3 million shares of HNC stock and options, which values the deal at about $124 million, based on yesterday's closing price. It is the fifth acquisition in less than a year for San Diego-based HNC, which is branching out beyond its original business of predictive software to detect financial fraud. [San Diego Tribune, Sep 17]

SBIR Firm Becomes the Standard(Aug 17) HNC Software (San Diego, CA)says it is now in the S&P SmallCap 600. HNC was Hecht-Nielsen (Bob Hecht-Nielsen is still chairman and chief scientist) and a winner of neural net contracts from Star Wars in the 80s. Its tiny titbit of SBIR gives SBIR awarders some basis to boast about a tiny something.

got a Saturday midnight call from your credit card company about an suspicious pattern of your card use? Especially suspicious: consumer electronics purchases in California by an East Coaster who had just bought an airline ticket adjustment, paid a hotel bill, and returned a rental car. Neural nets are watching, including a $150K version from HNC Software (San Diego, CA), says Forbes Jun 2.

HNC to OUTPERFORM (Mar31) Morgan Stanly's hot-shot HNCS analyst upgraded HNC Software (San Diego, CA) to OUTPERFORM since the "shares traded at a discount to the company's estimated 50% long-term growth rate". The analyst was rated number 1 (of 7) in ability to predict HNCS price and number 5 to forecast earnings with an average historical error of one penny in forecasting earnings and generated "an average excess return of 7.00% when making recommendations for this company". Such a set of statistics in the dog-eat-dog competition on Wall Street. Three significant figures is pretty rich for a company public only two years. Ah well, Wall Street has to have something to talk about since it doesn't create the wealth, only redistributes it. Like politicians. Maybe SBIR program managers could also use statistics more sophisticated than 1-2-3 addition.

Big Profit at HNC (Jan 24) HNC Software (San Diego, CA) reported a $5.3M quarterly profit on sales of $16.8M. Net profit for the year $6.4M on sales of $54M. Maybe the biggest SBIR success, although the $3M of DOD SBIR must have been no more than a modest contributor to HNC's growth.

Spread the Merchandise Management (Jan 14) Retek Information Systems, a subsidiary of HNC Software (a $600M market cap SBIR user) announced a new addition of software to unite large retail merchandisers' internal operations by Internet. Now Centralized Stores Inc can control all its software centrally. Wait, isn't that bringing management back to the days of the Info Systems priesthood so those pesky individuals can't innovate outside Info's control? One analyst estimates that a PC costs $10-12K per year and a network computer (semi-dumb terminal) only $2-3K per year. George Gilder would probably say, if asked, that such a move violates his theory of the microcosm (essentially infinite decentralization). Management doesn't surrender easily though.

Hold HNCS  A financial house brought HNC Software (San Diego, CA) into its watch portfolio and recommended its listeners hold HNC Software stock even at 81 times next years earnings. HNC had a little SBIR help.

Thinking Against Fraud  Where a new life form arises, there will a new life form also arise to feed on it. Feeding fraudsters applying for credit cards may be discovered by Falcon Sentry's new smart software (ever heard anybody advertise dumb software?) from HNC Software(San Diego, CA). Thus HNC's parade of new neural network product announcements marches on. Its stock price had a nice 15% boost last week also to 38, a stock that's ranged from 10 to 50 in the past year.

Claim Paternity. HNC's commercial victory offers a ripe chance for a federal agency to claim great success for its SBIR program. Such a victory should attract fathers, at least among California politicians. Divide HNC sales by SBIR input, get a large number, and smile. In cold truth HNC would have won without any SBIR, but without any real SBIR program evaluation who would ever throw such cold water on the claim? Everyone has an incentive to accept the claim except the federal career managers who would like SBIR to dry up.

Cardholder Bankruptcy Prediction  HNC Software (San Diego, CA) introduced a neural net prediction system that tells your bank when you're going broke. The scheme, ProftMax Bankruptcy, uses HNC' patented cardholder profiling technology. Such new products are how high-tech innovators keep up their momentum after the first product finds market success. Yogi may say it's not over till it's over, but for high-tech companies, it's never over. HNC got some nourishment from BMDO, both mainline missile defense research (years before it went public) and a small SBIR. 

Neural Nets for Japan Bank A Japanese bank will get neural net software from HNC Software (San Diego, CA) to fight bank card fraud. HNC got a little BMDO money for development in the late 80s and one Phase 2 SBIR for data compression. Its stock has traded many multiples above the 1994 IPO price.

HocusLocus (Albany,NY)

HocusLocus (Albany, NY; no SBIR) startup at SUNY Polytechnic Institute that is developing technology that someday could kill cells infected with HIV or Ebola, has received $1 million in [NIH & NSF] grants ... previously received money from the NIH and the Eastern New York Angels   [Chelsea Diana, Albany Business Review, Jul 9, 15]

HocusLocus (Albany, NY; no SBIR)  SUNY Polytechnic Institute startup that is developing technology which could someday kill cells infected with HIV or Ebola, received a $225,000 [NIH SBIR] grant ...  previously received money from the NIH and the Eastern New York Angels  ...  develops technology that allows researchers to switch on or off the expression of a desired gene. That technology can kill targeted cells, including viruses  [Chelsea Diana, Albany Business Review, Jun 15, 15]

Hoku Scientific (Kapolei HI)

Hoku Scientific(Kapolei HI, 17 employees; no SBIR), a materials science company focused on clean energy technologies, up 18%after broker Piper Jaffray raised its rating, saying support from solar company Suntech Power Holdings may assist its search for financing. [Wall Street Journal, Sep 5]

Holaira (Plymouth, MN)

startup [Holaira (Plymouth, MN; no SBIR)] developing technology for treating lung disease has closed on $42 million in venture capital [led by Vertex Venture Holdings, a subsidiary of Singapore investment firm]. ... moved to Twin Cities from Washington (state) [Katharine Grayson, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, Apr 3, 14] 

Hollingsworth & Vose (East Walpole, MA)

Two Albany area startups in the battery and energy storage industry have been awarded $250,000 in New York state funding for product development. Eonix (Colonie, NY; no SBIR) [startup developing technology to expand the capacity of ultracapacitors] and Combined Energies (Latham, NY;  SBIR) [developing distributed generation systems to extend the life of electrochemical batteries] were among the nine companies that received funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.  ... also gave $250,000 to Hollingsworth & Vose  (East Walpole, MA; no SBIR) an advanced materials manufacturing company with filtration, battery separator and industrial applications.   [Megan Rogers, Albany Business Review, Oct 27, 14]  Since 2012, the state agency has funded Paper Battery Co., BESS Technologies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and many other state entities. 

Hollis-Eden Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA)

Hollis-Eden Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA: no SBIR; 66 employees) surged 41% after the drug developer reported promising data from animal tests of a breast-cancer drug. [Wall Street Journal, Sep 8]

Holomni (Mountain View, CA)

Over the last half-year, Google has quietly acquired seven technology companies in an effort to create a new generation of robots. ....  not something aimed at consumers. Instead, the company’s expected targets are in manufacturing ....  Among the companies are Schaft, a small team of Japanese roboticists who recently left Tokyo University to develop a humanoid robot, and Industrial Perception  (Palo Alto, CA; no SBIR), a start-up here that has developed computer vision systems and robot arms for loading and unloading trucks. Also acquired were Meka (San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) and Redwood Robotics  (San Francisco, CA; no SBIR), makers of humanoid robots and robot arms, and Bot & Dolly  (San Francisco, CA; no SBIR), a maker of robotic camera systems that were recently used to create special effects in the movie “Gravity.” A related firm, Autofuss  (San Francisco, CA; no SBIR), which focuses on advertising and design, and Holomni  (Mountain View, CA, no SBIR) a small design firm that makes high-tech wheels. The seven companies are capable of creating technologies needed to build a mobile, dexterous robot. Mr. Rubin said he was pursuing additional acquisitions.  [John Markoff, New York Times, Dec 4, 13]  Note that all the US companies live around San Francisco Bay with the hotbed of innovative venture capital. And none needed SBIR to attract major investment. 

Homology Medicine (Lexington, MA)

Homology (Bedford, MA; no SBIR) wrapped up an $83.5 million Series B round ... making the bold claim that its underlying science, technology it calls AMEnDR, is a better version of existing gene editing methods, among them the CRISPR-Cas9 technology that has taken the scientific research world by storm and has led to the formation of three now publicly traded companies, Editas Medicine (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR), Intellia Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR), and CRISPR Therapeutics (Switzerland). [Ben Fidler, xconomy.com, Aug 1, 17]

A group of biotech veterans have debuted today a new company, Homology Medicine (Lexington, MA; no SBIR), with a bold claim that their underlying science is a better version of the gene editing methods, such as CRISPR-Cas9, that have captured the attention of patients, doctors, and scientists looking to treat desperate diseases.  The claim is, for now, untested, as none of the work has been published. One of the company’s backers says Homology will publish some of its findings soon.  .... has $43.5 million in Series A financing  [Ben Fidler, xconomy.com, May 2, 16]

Honeycomb Battery

G3 (Global Graphene Group, Dayton, OH), a holding company for subsidiaries Angstron Materials  ($150K SBIR) , Honeycomb Battery (no SBIR) and Nanotek Instruments  ($3M SBIR), announced that it has secured the first $10 million of a Preferred Series A investment ... with conditions for a second close of an additional $13 million for a total $23 million Series A investment.  G3 is engaged in commercializing graphene raw materials, and graphene-enabled applications including nanocomposites, thermal interface materials, and advanced batteries.   [Roni Peleg,  www.graphene-info.com, Jul 20, 16]

Hontek (South Windsor, CT)

Hong had been laid off from his job as a chemist at a Rockville printing plate maker, joining the more than 50,000 Connecticut workers who lost jobs that year ...  wrote a proposal to create a plastic-based coating to protect the blades from erosion.  "It was a long shot. I was just one person working in my basement," Hong said. "These programs are extremely competitive. I sent it in and forgot about it."  Today, Sikorsky Aircraft and the Army are using Hontek's polymer coatings to protect helicopter blades from sand, ice and gravel. He got a 1992 SBIR.  Hontek (South Windsor, CT; $3M SBIR)  grew from two to 10 employees, and in 1997 moved to its present location, a 13,000-square-foot facility.  In 2005, the military needed a new type of coating that would de-ice the blades of helicopters deployed in Afghanistan.  Hontek responded, using private funding to develop a new coating.  ... Last year, the Army decided to use Hontek's coating on its new Black Hawk helicopters. [Janice Podsada, Hartford Courant, Feb 4, 09] He has also had Phase 1 SBIRs in 2006 and 2007. The story doesn't explain why he chose private funding in 2005 after he had established friendly acceptance in DOD's SBIR.  

Hoopers Island Oyster Aquaculture (Fishers Creek, MD)

Fifteen university research teams from Maryland will receive a total of $4.1 million to work with local companies to turn their research into products that could one day be sold on the commercial market.  .... MIPS will contribute $1.8 million and private companies will contribute $2.8 million. The companies:  A&G Pharmaceutical (Columbia, MD; no SBIR),  Rehabtics LLC (Baltimore, MD; no SBIR)  High Impact Environmental (Church Hill, MD; no SBIR),  Birich Technologies (Towson, MD; no SBIR), Earth Networks (Germantown, MD; no SBIR), Fiberight (Halethorpe, MD; no SBIR), CoolCAD Electronics (College Park,MD $1.6M SBIR), XChanger Companies (Annapolis, MD; no SBIR), Remedium Technologies (College Park, MD; no SBIR), Pothole Pros LLC (Waldorf, MD; no SBIR), Hoopers Island Oyster Aquaculture (Fishers Creek, MD; no SBIR),  Metompkin Seafood (Crisfield, MD; no SBIR) GreatGrow Maryland LLC (Rock Hall, MD; no  SBIR), vCalc (Hagerstown, MD;  SBIR), Shore Thing Shellfish (Tall Timbers, MD; no SBIR). ($114,094)  [Sarah Gantz,  Baltimore Business Journal, Feb 26, 14] 

Hoppe Tool (Chicopee, MA)

Mason Box (North Attleboro, MA) is among several local companies that have been selected to participate in the "Next Generation Manufacturing Initiative, or NGMI, an effort to foster best-in-class manufacturing processes. Other participants in the initiative include Hoppe Tool (Chicopee, MA), Matouk Textiles (Fall River, MA),  Munksjo Paper (Fitchburg, MA), and Spectro Coating (Leominster, MA).  The initiative is a partnership of the Associated Industries of Massachusetts, a nonprofit group representing Bay State employers; , the commonwealth's finance and development authority; and the Massachusetts Manufacturing Extension Partnership, a group dedicated to helping local manufacturers remain competitive in a global marketplace.  [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe]

Hsiri Therapeutics (King of Prussia, PA)

BioAdvance, the operator of a $50 million early stage life sciences fund that work with health-care entrepreneurs in the mid-Atlantic region, invested $2.9 million in companies and technologies targeting human health during fiscal 2016. Among the winners were:   

  • Genome Profiling (Newark, DE; no SBIR)  $100,000 to discover novel epigenetic biomarkers based on its proprietary, genome-wide methylation profiling platform to improve how to treat, diagnose, and predict chronic and life-threatening disease;
  • Mebias Discovery (Philadelphia, PA; no SBIR) $800,000 to launch its platform for identifying biased ligands for next generation GPCR drugs;
  • Enzium (Philadelphia,PA; no SBIR)  $140,000 to develop its proprietary protease assay technology for use in measuring drug levels of the new direct oral anticoagulants in patients;
  • Hsiri Therapeutics (King of Prussia, PA; no SBIR) $70,000 to develop novel siderophore-based antibiotics for hard-to-treat bacteria;
  • RiboNova (Wynnewood, PA;  no SBIR) $175,000 to develop small molecules against novel defective transfer RNA anti-cancer targets and to pursue a clinical trial in mitochondrial diseases.  
[John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Aug 5, 2016]

HTG Molecular (Tucson, AZ)

HTG Molecular Diagnostics up 13% [Jun 1,17]

HTG Molecuar Diagnostics down 10% [Apr 7, 17]

HTG Molecuar Diagnostics up 32% [Apr 6, 17]

HTG Molecular Diagnostics down 10% [Apr 4, 17]

HTG Molecuar Diagnostics down 50% [Mar 31, 17]

HTG Molecular Diagnostics up 12% [Mar 30, 17]

HTG Molecular Diagnostics down 10% [Mar 29, 17]

HTG Molecular down 24% [Mar 28, 17]

HTG Molecular (Tucson, AZ; no SBIR) up 146% [Mar 24, 17]

HTG Molecular (Tucson, AZ; no SBIR)  up 83% [Mar 23, 17]  provider of instruments, reagents, and services for molecular profiling applications, today announced that its HTG EdgeSeq technology has been successfully adapted for use with the QIAGEN GeneReader NGS System based on the results of initial technical feasibility tests. Results from samples tested with the HTG EdgeSeq DLBCL Cell of Origin Assay gene panel adapted for detection with the GeneReader NGS System showed strong correlation (r = 0.98) to data previously generated on the MiSeq sequencer.  [company presss release, Mar 23, 17]

HTSS (Madison,WI)

The Wisconsin Department of Commerce has qualified two biotech companies to receive investor tax credits, the agency said Thursday. Perscitus Biosciences LLC is developing a molecule that has shown an ability to protect healthy human cells against the harmful effects of chemotherapy and radiation. HTSS LLC, Milwaukee, is developing a technology that analyzes muscle activity to help reduce injuries during exercise regimens. Certain investors in both companies are now eligible to claim tax credits under legislation known as Act 255. [Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Jun 27]  No SBIR.

Humacyte (Research Triangle Park, NC)

Humacyte (Research Triangle Park, NC; at least $3M SBIR, founded 2004), an innovator in biotechnology and regenerative medicine, announced that the company has received a contract award of $3.4 million from the (DoD). [to] support the addition of clinical sites for Humacyte’s Phase II vascular trauma trial in the US.  [company press release, Oct 2, 17]  also  received a $14.1 million award from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). Funding will support a new clinical trial comparing the Human Acellular Vessel (HAV, or HUMACYL®) to arteriovenous fistulas, the standard of care for creating vascular access in patients undergoing hemodialysis.  [company press release, Sep 29, 17]  also  received approximately $650,000 from the Medical Technology Enterprise Consortium (MTEC). [company press release, Sep 27, 17]

Humacyte (Research Triangle Park, NC; $200K SBIR) launched a Phase 2 trial of its human acellular vessel Humacyl in the U.S. as an arterial bypass vessel in patients’ legs, the company has announced.   [Jennifer Henderson,  Triangle Business Journal, Dec 29, 16]

Humacyte (Durham, NC; $200K SBIR) hopes its regenerative medicine approach to blood vessels can offer a better and longer-lasting alternative to synthetic implants used to replace blocked veins. ...  said that it has received $9.9 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), the California state agency ... nearly 10 months after Humacyte raised $150 million in a Series B round  [Frank Vinluan, xconomy.com, Aug 8, 16]

Humacyte, (Research Triangle Park, NC; $200K SBIR) announced that it has raised $150 million in financing from a group of global investors.  ... will support the company’s upcoming Phase 3 clinical trials for its HumaGraft treatment, which is intended for patients undergoing hemodialysis.  ...  Last year, [FDA] assigned fast track status to HumaGraft. ... founded in 2004 by a Duke University researcher, Laura Niklason, and two of her former Duke students, Juliana Blum and Shannon Dahl.  [David Bracken, Raleigh News & Observer, Oct 20, 15]

Humacyte (RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC; one SBIR) names former Kansas Gov. Sebelius to board ... develops products for tissue regeneration  [Melissa Wylie, KC Businerss Journal, Sep 3, 15]

FDA has given fast-track status to a treatment called HumaGraft being developed by Humacyte (Research Triangle Park, NC; $200K SBIR)  ... intended to improve treatments for hemodialysis patients by providing reliable vascular access. It is also expected to minimize certain complications that exist with current treatments. ...   is conducting an investigational trial for the treatment in Poland and has recruited participants for two studies in the United States and Europe.   [Corinne Jurney, Raleigh News & Observer, July 25, 2014]

Humacyte (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR) developing lab-grown blood vessels has attracted one of the most powerful women in business as its CEO. ...  Carrie S. Cox, 53, to lead the company as it expands ... founded in 2004 and based on research at Duke University led by Laura Niklason and two former Duke students ...  employs 15 people who are testing engineered blood vessels designed to be implanted into the arms of dialysis patients [Alan Wolf, Raleigh News & Observer, Sep 9, 10]

three years after forming Humacyte (Research Triangle Park, NC; no SBIR)

to pursue their research, the three women are a year or two away from testing their blood vessels in patients.  [Sabine Vollmer, Raleigh News& Observer, Nov 30]

Humanetics (Eden Prairie, MN)

Humanetics (Minneapolis, MN; $1.2M SBIR) has been awarded a patent relating to methods of mitigating erectile dysfunction (ED) as an adverse side effect of radiation therapy for prostate cancer using their proprietary radioprotectant compound, BIO 300.  [company press release, Jan 24, 17]

Humanetics (Eden Prairie, MN; $600K SBIR) received a $3.5 million government contract to develop a drug to prevent injury to the lungs during a nuclear explosion. The money would go toward preliminary efficacy studies. .. Humanetics historically had made most of its revenue through selling wholesale dietary ingredients for weight loss. Last year, the company announced it received licenses from the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit to develop and market two experimental treatments that aim to protect people from radiation’s effects during cancer treatment and terrorist attacks. [Wendy Lee, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Jun 13, 11]

Human Genome Sciences

Human Genome Sciences (Rockville, MD; no SBIR) fell 44%, after it moved high-dose Albuferon patients in two continuing late-stage hepatitis C trials to the low-dose group, citing higher rates of serious lung-related problems in those using the higher dosage.  [Wall Street Journal, Jan 24, 08]

Human Metabolome Technologies (Cambridge, MA)

Human Metabolome Technologies is opening its first US location in Cambridge. The Kendall Square site -- which includes laboratory space -- will have 20 employees by 2015,... chose Cambridge to gain access to the area’s many pharmaceutical firms and research institutions. [Laura Finaldi, Boston Globe, Nov 8]  Innovation has better prospects in the presence of other innovators and commercializers.

HuTerra  (De Pere, WI) (Framingham, MA)

[Wisconsin]EDC certified four other companies to receive the tax credits they were:MPSP LLC, Milwaukee; HuTerra LLC, De Pere; and HealthMyne ,(Madison.Pegasus Sustainability Solutions Fitchburg, was approved to receive the certification and a $125,000 loan.  WEDC also said Tuesday that it has approved low-interest loans for two other emerging companies. Xolve , Middleton, will receive a $330,000 loan; and Shamrock Energy, Neenah, will get a $150,000 loan.[Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jul 2, 13]  None had SBIR. 

Huya Bioscience International (San Diego, CA)

Huya Bioscience International  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) biotech developing drugs throughout Asia, said Japan’s Eisai is paying up to $280 million for rights to Huya’s experimental cancer drug HBI-8000 in Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, and Singapore. HBI-8000 is being tested as a potential treatment for solid tumors and non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. [Alex Lash, xconomy.com, Feb 5, 16]

Hybritech (San Diego, CA)

San Diego County is noted as fertile ground for innovative start-ups[with] local biotech cluster that excels at bringing creative new ideas to market. It all began at UC San Diego and adjacent biomedical research institutions on the Torrey Pines Mesa. .... In the late 1970s, Hybritech (before SBIR) pioneered the use of monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics. Today, Illumina leads the world in developing advanced technology for sequencing DNA and Ionis Pharmaceuticals  leads the pack in using a broad method called antisense to create drugs that alter the effects of targeted genes. ... And this summer, the for-profit Synthetic Genomics (La Jolla, CA; no SBIR) unveiled a potential replacement for the workhorse bacterium E. coli, an engineered bacterium that replicates far faster, speeding up experiments and production of biotech products such as drugs.   [Bradley Fikes, San Diego Union Tribune, Sep 13, 16]

Hybrivet   (Framingham, MA)

Hybrivet Systems (Natick, MA; one 1992 SBIR)  developer of contaminant detection systems, has been acquired by [giant R&D driven]3M. No financial terms of the deal were disclosed. ...   develops LeadCheck Swabs, a commercially available lead detection tool recognized by the [EPA]. Its other detectors of contaminants and toxins include products for identifying the presence of hexavalent chromium ions, mercury, cadmium, nickel, copper and arsenic.  ....   founded in 1987 by Marcia Stone, has 11 employees. [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Feb 17, 11]

in April, the US Environmental Protection Agency implemented a new rule requiring contractors to use lead-safe work practices and check for lead whenever renovating, repairing, or painting a building constructed before 1978. Hybrivet’s (Framingham, MA; one SBIR in 1992) test, LeadCheck, is one of only a few kits currently recognized by the EPA to check for the substance, which can be extremely toxic even at low levels. All of a sudden, Hybrivet couldn’t make its product fast enough  [Boston Globe, Sep 8, 10]

HYCOR Biomedical (Garden Grove, CA)

  (Garden Grove, CA; no SBIR) maker of diagnostic products for clinical laboratories today announced plans to relocate its headquarters to Central Indiana, state officials announced. ... entered the diagnostics market in 1984 and provides urinalysis, allergy and autoimmune testing products for clinical laboratories, hospitals and doctors' offices worldwide. Indiana taxpayer inducement $640K.  [Indianapolis Star, Apr 27, 11]

Hydra Biosciences (Cambridge, MA)

Hydra Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; two SBIRs) is getting ready to launch the first human trial of the drug it’s developing with Cubist Pharmaceuticals, which is in a novel class of pain drugs. The startup also recently inked a collaboration deal with its Cambridge neighbor Zalicus  to develop multiple novel drug candidates for the treatment of pain.  [Erin Kutx, xconomy.com, Feb 17, 12]

Hydra Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; two SBIRs)and Cubist Pharmaceuticals said they plan to start a Phase 1 clinical trial for an experimental pain and inflammation drug on which they are collaborating, triggering a $5 million milestone payment to Hydra from Cubist. [Lori Valigra, Mass High Tech, Jan 11, 12]

the increasingly prominent role big pharmaceutical companies are taking during the recession — both to help get new biotech firms off the ground and to prop up those companies with promising technologies, but few financing options. .... MedImmune Ventures, an arm of MedImmune Inc., which is a subsidiary of AstraZeneca plc. The venture arm has $300 million under management and has invested $200 million, including investments in Hydra Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; $250K SBIR) and Inotek Pharmaceuticals (Lexington, MA; $20+M SBIR)    [Mass High Tech, Aug 14, 09]

Hydra Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; two SBIRs) brought in $22.2 million in a fourth venture funding round to advance a number of Hydra’s ion channel drug programs to fight pain, inflammation, and pulmonary disease [Mass High Tech, Jan 16, 09]

Hydra Biosciences <(Cambridge, MA; 2 SBIRs) confirmed reports it raised $34M in its third round of venture capital. .... 36 employees, is in the early stages of developing potential treatments for pain management and hopes to begin clinical testing on at least one of them next year.  [Boston Globe, Mar 15]

Hydra Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; two SBIRs) raised $34M in a Series C round of funding. [Mass High Tech, Mar 13, 08]

Hydra Biosciences (Cambridge, MA; two SBIRs) inked a deal potentially worth more than $195M with  Pfizer to develop treatments for pain [Mass High Tech, Jul 26, 07]

HydroCision (North Billerica, MA)

Medical device company HydroCision (North Billerica, MA; no SBIR) said  that new investors have acquired the company ... develops and markets SpineJet, a surgical technology that is designed to allow discectomy and interbody fusion procedures to be performed faster and less invasively than traditional surgical methods. ...  founded in 1994, will focus on several core strategies, and that it plans to invest in U.S.-based research projects to prove the economic value of its products. [James Connolly, Mass High Tech, Sep 16, 10]

Hydrogen Safety (East Hartford,CT)

Six start-up technology firms have received grants as part of the state's small-business incubator program,  ... administered by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology ...  $32,000 to $50,000 went to: AllerQuest LLC of West Hartford, Catelectric Corp. of Storrs, Hydrogen Safety of East Hartford, Quadra-Aerrow International of Glastonbury, Revegen of Farmington and the Center for Network Centric Product Support Research of East Hartford.  [Hartford Courant, Dec 12, 08]  no SBIR for any

HydroLogic Industries (El Paso,TX)

HydroLogic Industries (El Paso, TX; no SBIR)  received $340,000 of an award up to $1 million [from Texas Emerging Technology Fund] for the development of a water purification system that separates pure water from salt, hydrocarbons and other substances. The company, founded in 2007, will collaborate with the University of Texas at El Paso. [Christopher Calnan Austin Business Journal, Jul 25, 13]

Hygeia Therapeutics (Holden, MA)

Hygeia (Ann Arbor, MI; no SBIR) medtech startup specializing in digital insulin therapy, has inked a deal with Spirit Healthcare in the U.K. to distribute its d-Nav insulin guidance product. Spirit will license and become a local distributor of the d-Nav Service and other tools developed by Hygieia through March 2021. The Spirit distribution agreement builds on Hygieia’s successful implementation of the d-Nav Service in Northern Ireland. As of next month, In 2016, its South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust (SEHSCT) presented data demonstrating that National Health Service (NHS) patients using the d-Nav Service experienced a significant drop in average blood glucose (known as HbA1c) and a substantial reduction in diabetes care costs within 12 months. [company press release, Sep 5, 17]

Hygeia Therapeutics (Holden, MA; no SBIR) reported today that it has completed a $1 million Series A financing. .... founded in 2007, and focuses on developing topical therapies for conditions where localized treatment offers advantages over systemic therapies.     [Mass High Tech, Apr 19, 10]

HyperBranch Medical Technologies (Durham, NC) (Cambridge, MA)

HyperBranch Medical Technology (Durham, NC; $500K SBIR) raised $1.7 million in equity funding to help take a new surgical sealant device through the regulatory approval process. [Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Jun 6, 12]

Private investment continues to boost young Triangle companies. Biologics  (Raleigh NC; no SBIR) oncology pharmacy, $20M; . Aldagen  (Durham NC; no SBIR) biotech company, $9 M; HyperBranch Medical Technologies  (Durham NC; one SBIR) medical device startup, $1.5M. [Sabine Vollmer, Raleigh News & Observer, Sep 15] Those who can, do; those who can't or won't depend on government handouts.

Hyperion Therapeutics (South San Francisco, CA)

Hyperion Therapeutics (Brisbane, CA; no SBIR) stopped development of a type 1 diabetes drug after employees at an Israeli company it bought three months ago allegedly manipulated data to give a clinical trial a favorable result.   [Ron Leuty, San Francisco Business Times, Sep 8, 14] 

Hyperion Therapeutics< (South San Francisco,CA; no SBIR) biotech company developing drugs against metabolic disorders, will seek $57.5 million in an [IPO].  [San Francisco Business Times, Apr 17, 12]

Hyperion Therapeutics (South San Francisco, CA; no SBIR) raised $60 million in its third round of venture funding. ...  late-stage clinical testing of its drug for urea cycle disorders [San Francisco Business Times, Jul 2, 09]

HyperMed (Waltham, MA)

HyperMed (Burlington, MA; $2.7M SBIR) filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection ... owns over 40 patents related to different medical devices, ... ceased operations and the phone number has been disabled. Online business directories say the private company was established in 1997 and had 21 employees. [Julie Donnelly, Mass High Tech, Dec 23, 09] 

HyperMed (Waltham, MA; $2.7M SBIR) says it has closed on $4M in a new wave of Series A financing to market its hyperspectral medical imaging product, OxyVu,

Hypres (Elmsford, NY)

All digital RF superconductor technology from Hypres (Elmsford, NY; over $40M SBIR), says MDA's Tech Applications Fall 2008 quarterly.  MDA's piece talks the usual talk about marketing, tech benefits, and hopes for the future, but says nothing about whether the company produced any economic effect after $40M SBIR over two decades.  Of course, it's not Tech App's role to evaluate SBIR, only to tell MDA's best stories. We might conclude, though, that if such a project ranks as one of MDA's best stories this year from many tens of millions of SBIR dollars, MDA's SBIR must be paying no heed to SBIR's objective to nurture infant technology with an economic future. Perhaps the SBTC will put some bold lipstick on SBIR by citing MDA's story as another compelling sign of SBIR's success.

Hypres (Elmsford, NY) got some publicity by publishing a self-congratulatory article in IEEE Spectrum Dec 2000. If you like electronics at temperatures below a North Pole Christmas, you'll like the low temperature superconductivity for which Hypres has had something like $20M of SBIR since 1986. The piece concludes with a vision that such electronics may replace conventional microelectronics as they reach "their physical and economic limits. The drivers will be the market's demand for higher bandwidth and for seamless RF and digital integration." Ok, when will the government get a competitive return in its investment? The old SBIR question arises, "how much and how long should a seed program nurse a technology that won't sell?".

Hy-Syence (Fall River, MA)

No fewer than four groups in Massachusetts are racing to bring so-called microbial fuel cells to market through a variety of applications. None has been commercialized yet, but industry insiders say microbial fuel cells hold the potential to become a major part of the renewable energy equation. ...    Hy-SyEnce (Fall River, MA; no SBIR)is working to generate large-scale power from the wastewater of food-processing plants, while IntAct Labs LLC (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR)  is applying its technology to similar industrial applications, as well as the possibility of generating power and recycling waste products during space missions.  A research group out of Harvard University, on the other hand, is hoping to provide power for lighting and other systems in developing nations, while Derek Lovley’s Geobactor Project at UMass Amherst is looking to create organic batteries that could one day power computers or even vehicles.  [Mass High Tech, Aug 22]

HyTrust (Mountain View, CA)

Cloud security startup HyTrust (Mountain View, CA; no SBIR  raised $12.5 million in Series C funding from investors that includes a new strategic partnership with stealthy U.S. intelligence funder I-Q-Tel. ... "We provide security for virtualized networks and the cloud for a number of Fortune 500 companies and In-Q-Tel saw the same kind of need for U.S. intelligence agencies," [CEO] Chiu [said] [Cromwell Schubarth, Silicon Valley Business Journal, Jul 16, 13]

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